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(Yahoo)   Oregon family discovers their dream home was a former meth lab. No word if the home inspection was done by Vamanos Pests   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 95
    More: Scary, Oregon, non-disclosure agreement, Gil Kerlikowske, Yahoo News, lead paint, drug labs, doctor's visit, drug czar  
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6797 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Oct 2012 at 10:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-02 10:25:08 AM
The dead kid in the back yard didn't tip them off?

/dammit, Todd!
 
2012-10-02 10:26:11 AM
good thing METH isn't LEGAL. or else people would use OSOOOO much of it they'd all go crazy and not ever sleep again.
 
2012-10-02 10:28:01 AM
l.yimg.com

So... buying a house that used to be a meth lab isn't ironic enough for you?

Farking hipsters.

/What that photo taken with a film camera?
 
2012-10-02 10:28:56 AM

Smoky Dragon Dish: [l.yimg.com image 630x413]

So... buying a house that used to be a meth lab isn't ironic enough for you?

Farking hipsters.

/What that photo taken with a film camera?


it was taken with an ironic camera from 1973
 
2012-10-02 10:29:40 AM

Smoky Dragon Dish: [l.yimg.com image 630x413]

So... buying a house that used to be a meth lab isn't ironic enough for you?

Farking hipsters.

/What that photo taken with a film camera?


A little too ironic.
 
2012-10-02 10:32:03 AM
I'd challenge anyone to find a home in Klamath Falls that wasn't a meth lab at some point.
 
2012-10-02 10:36:18 AM
cn1.kaboodle.com
 
2012-10-02 10:39:21 AM
Better call Saul!
 
2012-10-02 10:39:44 AM

Chabash: I'd challenge anyone to find a home in Klamath Falls that wasn't a meth lab at some point.


You see the address? Radcliffe right across from Fred Meyer. I'm surprised there's a house in that area that isn't still a meth lab.
 
2012-10-02 10:40:11 AM
So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.
 
2012-10-02 10:41:13 AM
Shoulda checked the basement

www.fastcocreate.com
 
2012-10-02 10:45:56 AM

namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.


I RTFA, and it's worse than that: you're too cheap to pay $50 for a test kit. You don't have a spare $50 to ensure your home is safe for your baby, yet you think you need to be buying a home? And because you're too cheap to do even the most basic investigation on the home you are buying, you're going to blame Freddie Mac?
 
2012-10-02 10:46:07 AM
Take along a drug sniffing dog when house shopping. And stay away from any Realtor™ who's missing lots of teeth or much of a nose.

 i189.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-02 10:46:16 AM

tomo12144: Shoulda checked the basement

[www.fastcocreate.com image 585x312]


chuckpalahniuk.net

Better Call Saul!

/you beat me to it
 
2012-10-02 10:47:28 AM

namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.


Depends. What are the disclosure laws like in Oregon? In most Southern states the seller is required to disclose damn near everything of public significance to ever occur at a property. Failure to do so means the sale can be nullified by the buyer.
 
2012-10-02 10:52:16 AM
Dude, you bought a $36,000 house and were too cheap to pay $50 for a test kit or $250-$400 for a home inspection. You're an idiot and no one owes you a thing.

See it every day.
 
2012-10-02 10:52:18 AM

Chabash: I'd challenge anyone to find a home in Klamath Falls that wasn't a meth lab at some point.


I'd be more worried about the geckos.

farking fire and golden geckos can kill the SHIAT out of you early on, if you're not careful...
 
2012-10-02 10:58:47 AM

Felgraf: Chabash: I'd challenge anyone to find a home in Klamath Falls that wasn't a meth lab at some point.

I'd be more worried about the geckos.

farking fire and golden geckos can kill the SHIAT out of you early on, if you're not careful...


Nah, just put some points into melee and spear them in the eyes. The can't attack what they can't see. Besides there is nothing but that one shot pipe gun in the area.
 
2012-10-02 10:58:54 AM

jmr61: Dude, you bought a $36,000 house and were too cheap to pay $50 for a test kit or $250-$400 for a home inspection. You're an idiot and no one owes you a thing.

See it every day.


Or we devolve into Russian-esque levels of fraud and corruption in common business transactions.

We have disclosure laws for a reason: to reduce fraud.
 
2012-10-02 10:59:48 AM

Carousel Beast: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

Depends. What are the disclosure laws like in Oregon? In most Southern states the seller is required to disclose damn near everything of public significance to ever occur at a property. Failure to do so means the sale can be nullified by the buyer.


There was a story either last year or the year before about a couple on the east coast that got sick because the house they bought was a meth house. They did the normal inspection and everything was fine. The thing is that the sellers knew that it was a former meth house, local law enforcement knew that it was a former meth house and the health department knew it was a former meth house, but by law none of this information had to be disclosed to them by the seller and none of the information was available for them to request it. So basically the only way that they would have known that the house was a former meth house was if they had a separate test specifically for the chemicals meth leaves behind run during the inspection. And apparently when it comes to meth houses this policy applies in most of the U.S. So moral of the story is, before purchasing a home, especially one that has been vacant for a while, get a meth test done during the inspection. Also invest money in the companies that make the meth test because this is probably going to become a recommended part of the home inspection process.
 
2012-10-02 11:01:43 AM
I read this article and there are a lot of things that don't add up. Freddie Mac claims that they didn't know, and there is a disclosure requirement (assuming, of course, that they knew).

Skipping an inspection on a house with an "as-is" sale agreement is stupid. If anything, you should probably get more than one type of inspection done...

/expensive lesson learned
 
2012-10-02 11:02:33 AM
Huh? What?
TFA quotes an "expert" who says a recent call came from Michigan, a state with no disclosure law, where a father unknowingly purchased a meth-contaminated home. "He just buried his 14-year-old daughter after living in it for two years," Mazzuca said. "I could tell you stories like that for days."

Yes. Yes, you could. And a quick google seatch shows no such news story. And somehow, I'd think that would hit the news. Allow me to call BS
 
2012-10-02 11:03:29 AM
It's "Vamanos Pest". Singular.
 
2012-10-02 11:05:22 AM

ChipNASA: [cn1.kaboodle.com image 250x240]


Instagram now has hardware?
 
2012-10-02 11:06:47 AM

Carousel Beast: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

Depends. What are the disclosure laws like in Oregon? In most Southern states the seller is required to disclose damn near everything of public significance to ever occur at a property. Failure to do so means the sale can be nullified by the buyer.


There's always the "I didn't know" excuse with the disclosure laws. Especially when it's not being sold by the occupant. This may not ever have been known to be a meth house. There would be nothing to disclose.

What it comes down to is, if you can't afford an inspection and a $50 test kit, you can't afford to buy that house.
 
2012-10-02 11:07:21 AM

Felgraf: Chabash: I'd challenge anyone to find a home in Klamath Falls that wasn't a meth lab at some point.

I'd be more worried about the geckos.

farking fire and gordon geckos can kill the SHIAT out of you early on, if you're not careful...


1.bp.blogspot.com

I thought greed was good? No?
 
2012-10-02 11:09:48 AM
But Heisenberg Realty came highly recommended!
 
2012-10-02 11:10:50 AM
My friend got lucky with his first house, just a grow op in the garage.
 
2012-10-02 11:13:31 AM
Buying an "as is" home is an even greater reason to have an inspection!
When I bought my most recent home the realtor was surprised that we got a home inspection. She said most people here do not get one. That is crazy.
 
2012-10-02 11:17:02 AM

namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.


This family sounds dirt poor to me. I doubt they had the money to do all that. I mean, if you need a mortgage on a $36,000 house, you're in poor shape financially.
 
2012-10-02 11:17:09 AM

StrikitRich: But Heisenberg Realty came highly recommended!


And, make sure someone by the name of Jesse Pinkman never lived there...
media.tumblr.com

The following is just a bonus pic I found when searching for the above image... not related to the thread...
pics.wikifeet.com
 
2012-10-02 11:17:26 AM
The important thing is that we stay the course and keep the War on Drugs going.

We are almost there folks! Soooo close!
 
GCD
2012-10-02 11:18:25 AM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: My friend got lucky with his first house, just a grow op in the garage.


Grow ops aren't without their own set of issues too. The high humidity required to grow the plants tends to result in the formation of black mould.

The lights they use to grow the plants are also a huge draw on the electrical wires in the home. There has been numerous instances of where the wires have just simply overheated, sparking a fire and burning the house/building to the ground.

If they have taken the liberty of "upgrading" the wiring in the house, then it tends to be a DIY-job, which means it's not done right, it's not done to code and it can cause its own set of issues down the line.

If the place was given a thorough home inspection (with the inspector knowing it was a grow up previously) and a green light, then great.

If the home inspector didn't know it was a grow up previously, I'd definitely have it looked at sooner rather than later.
 
2012-10-02 11:19:42 AM

namegoeshere: Carousel Beast: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

Depends. What are the disclosure laws like in Oregon? In most Southern states the seller is required to disclose damn near everything of public significance to ever occur at a property. Failure to do so means the sale can be nullified by the buyer.

There's always the "I didn't know" excuse with the disclosure laws. Especially when it's not being sold by the occupant. This may not ever have been known to be a meth house. There would be nothing to disclose.

What it comes down to is, if you can't afford an inspection and a $50 test kit, you can't afford to buy that house.


Oregonian here. And I know someone who work's for the state's Clandestine Drug Lab Program (which is one person, for the entire state).

The legislature tried to pass a law requiring disclosure of drug lab activity if a house changes hands. Basically, if a residential meth/DMT lab is busted, that goes on the deed.

Guess who lobbied against and ultimately defeated that bill? The real estate lobby.

Fast forward a few years after the meth lab epidemic - before sudoephedrine was made prescription only, drug lab busts averaged one per day (and that's only the ones we knew about). There's a few thousand homes in this state that were known former labs.

Real estate agents are discovering they're getting sued for selling former meth labs to unsuspecting people.

Guess who's complaining to the state that there's no uniform disclosure process for former meth labs? Real estate agents.
 
2012-10-02 11:22:49 AM

GCD: Zarquon's Flat Tire: My friend got lucky with his first house, just a grow op in the garage.

Grow ops aren't without their own set of issues too. The high humidity required to grow the plants tends to result in the formation of black mould.

The lights they use to grow the plants are also a huge draw on the electrical wires in the home. There has been numerous instances of where the wires have just simply overheated, sparking a fire and burning the house/building to the ground.

If they have taken the liberty of "upgrading" the wiring in the house, then it tends to be a DIY-job, which means it's not done right, it's not done to code and it can cause its own set of issues down the line.

If the place was given a thorough home inspection (with the inspector knowing it was a grow up previously) and a green light, then great.

If the home inspector didn't know it was a grow up previously, I'd definitely have it looked at sooner rather than later.


Depends on the state, if you have medical marijuana then you have licensed electricians doing all the wiring and installation. I know a few that make a good portion of their money from those kind of jobs.
 
2012-10-02 11:23:04 AM

mr_bunny: The important thing is that we stay the course and keep the War on Drugs going.


I'm not sure that legal meth could ever be a good idea. Or cocaine, heroin or any other easily lethal drug. People are too stupid and would kill themselves left and right. You might say "Yay, Darwin!" and part of me says you'd be right. But sometimes there are innocent victims in that kind of situation: kids, wives, loved ones.

Or, you might say "but people already have access and kill themselves left and right now". You would also be right, but that access isn't wide open.

Definitely not a black and white issue.
 
2012-10-02 11:23:23 AM

insertsnarkyusername: Nah, just put some points into melee and spear them in the eyes. The can't attack what they can't see. Besides there is nothing but that one shot pipe gun in the area.


Well, you could tag Speech and do a Navarro run.
 
2012-10-02 11:23:54 AM

FizixJunkee: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

This family sounds dirt poor to me. I doubt they had the money to do all that. I mean, if you need a mortgage on a $36,000 house, you're in poor shape financially.


Hence the "penny wise, pound foolish." Now they are paying the mortgage on a house they can't live in, and paying rent on the house in which they live.

Whether you are buying a $30,000 house or a $300,000 house, if you can't afford to be smart about the transaction, you don't need to own that home. If you rent a house and find out it's contaminated, you're out a month's rent and the deposit on the next place, not $36,000.

The dream of home ownership at all costs is not always a good one.

Our mortgage lender required a thorough inspection, but I would never have bought without one even if they hadn't. We knew exactly what we were getting into, and also had an aproximate timeline for major repairs (roof, furnace, etc) which has proven very accurate.
 
2012-10-02 11:28:09 AM
I'm pretty sure every other house in Oregon is a former meth lab and that's just a conservative guess.
 
2012-10-02 11:29:21 AM

Felgraf: insertsnarkyusername: Nah, just put some points into melee and spear them in the eyes. The can't attack what they can't see. Besides there is nothing but that one shot pipe gun in the area.

Well, you could tag Speech and do a Navarro run.


True, but that always felt like I was taking advantage of the game to me. And I so enjoyed slaughtering everything on that base.
 
2012-10-02 11:30:16 AM

moops: It's "Vamanos Pest". Singular.


And it's actually "Vamonos Pest", as in the spanish word for "leave".

/"Vamonos!"
//"I wish"
 
2012-10-02 11:30:33 AM

namegoeshere: FizixJunkee: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

This family sounds dirt poor to me. I doubt they had the money to do all that. I mean, if you need a mortgage on a $36,000 house, you're in poor shape financially.

Hence the "penny wise, pound foolish." Now they are paying the mortgage on a house they can't live in, and paying rent on the house in which they live.

Whether you are buying a $30,000 house or a $300,000 house, if you can't afford to be smart about the transaction, you don't need to own that home. If you rent a house and find out it's contaminated, you're out a month's rent and the deposit on the next place, not $36,000.

The dream of home ownership at all costs is not always a good one.

Our mortgage lender required a thorough inspection, but I would never have bought without one even if they hadn't. We knew exactly what we were getting into, and also had an aproximate timeline for major repairs (roof, furnace, etc) which has proven very accurate.


More than likely when you purchased the house a thorough inspection didn't include an inspection for chemicals related to meth. That wouldn't be found in a normal inspection and up until 2 or 3 years ago inspecting for meth wouldn't have even crossed anybodies minds and it even today people don't realize the importance of it.
 
2012-10-02 11:31:21 AM

H31N0US: mr_bunny: The important thing is that we stay the course and keep the War on Drugs going.

I'm not sure that legal meth could ever be a good idea. Or cocaine, heroin or any other easily lethal drug. People are too stupid and would kill themselves left and right. You might say "Yay, Darwin!" and part of me says you'd be right. But sometimes there are innocent victims in that kind of situation: kids, wives, loved ones.

Or, you might say "but people already have access and kill themselves left and right now". You would also be right, but that access isn't wide open.

Definitely not a black and white issue.


Well said. And, if anything, this supports legalized weed.
 
2012-10-02 11:31:24 AM

Anastacya: I read this article and there are a lot of things that don't add up. Freddie Mac claims that they didn't know, and there is a disclosure requirement (assuming, of course, that they knew).

Skipping an inspection on a house with an "as-is" sale agreement is stupid. If anything, you should probably get more than one type of inspection done...

/expensive lesson learned


What if you do get an inspection and your inspector fails to note a big issue?
 
2012-10-02 11:37:20 AM
My favorite montage from Breaking Bad...just because.

Crystal Blue Persuasion
 
2012-10-02 11:37:55 AM
Doh! Link didn't work!

http://vimeo.com/48739828
 
2012-10-02 11:40:37 AM

H31N0US: mr_bunny: The important thing is that we stay the course and keep the War on Drugs going.

I'm not sure that legal meth could ever be a good idea. Or cocaine, heroin or any other easily lethal drug. People are too stupid and would kill themselves left and right. You might say "Yay, Darwin!" and part of me says you'd be right. But sometimes there are innocent victims in that kind of situation: kids, wives, loved ones.

Or, you might say "but people already have access and kill themselves left and right now". You would also be right, but that access isn't wide open.

Definitely not a black and white issue.


I would not say, "Yay Darwin!"

I would, however, hand those drugs right back to the doctors that know about them and take them back from the DEA.

Heroin is a marvelous pain killer. It made the Bayer corporation millions. Prohibition just leads to lawlessness and violence.
It really does just have to end.

Spain, Portugal and Italy did it and society didn't fall apart.
 
2012-10-02 11:45:10 AM

ongbok: namegoeshere: FizixJunkee: namegoeshere: So you're buying a foreclosed home in a high meth area, and you don't get an inspection, environmental survey, and detailed history?

Then you deserve everything you get, you penny wise, pound foolish people.

This family sounds dirt poor to me. I doubt they had the money to do all that. I mean, if you need a mortgage on a $36,000 house, you're in poor shape financially.

Hence the "penny wise, pound foolish." Now they are paying the mortgage on a house they can't live in, and paying rent on the house in which they live.

Whether you are buying a $30,000 house or a $300,000 house, if you can't afford to be smart about the transaction, you don't need to own that home. If you rent a house and find out it's contaminated, you're out a month's rent and the deposit on the next place, not $36,000.

The dream of home ownership at all costs is not always a good one.

Our mortgage lender required a thorough inspection, but I would never have bought without one even if they hadn't. We knew exactly what we were getting into, and also had an aproximate timeline for major repairs (roof, furnace, etc) which has proven very accurate.

More than likely when you purchased the house a thorough inspection didn't include an inspection for chemicals related to meth. That wouldn't be found in a normal inspection and up until 2 or 3 years ago inspecting for meth wouldn't have even crossed anybodies minds and it even today people don't realize the importance of it.


True, but we knew we were buying from a family who were relocating out of state for the father's business. When we bought, meth hadn't yet found its way here. The house was in good condition. There was a clear list of owners from the builder to the sellers. The neighbors were long term, and knew all the previous owners. The chance that this house was ever a meth house was minute to none.

Had we been buying an empty forclosure in poor shape in a known meth area, we would have spent the $50 for the test kit. Not doing so would be stupid, as these people are finding out.
 
2012-10-02 11:58:29 AM

FizixJunkee: Anastacya: I read this article and there are a lot of things that don't add up. Freddie Mac claims that they didn't know, and there is a disclosure requirement (assuming, of course, that they knew).

Skipping an inspection on a house with an "as-is" sale agreement is stupid. If anything, you should probably get more than one type of inspection done...

/expensive lesson learned

What if you do get an inspection and your inspector fails to note a big issue?


Then you go after their Errors and Omissions policy.
 
2012-10-02 12:03:50 PM
We bought our first home 2 months ago. It is in SE Portland. It had been foreclosed at one point, was rehabbed and flipped. Now it is a great place. You better believe I scoured the Internet looking for any link between our address and meth. I learned from the neighbors that the reason people have moved in and out of this place so often is they grew out of it. Apparently this house has a reputation of a baby factory. That lent the place a good feel in my mind. 100 year old houses can be creepy, and friends ask if there are ghosts, but this place is full of life.

Anyhoo, do your research, people. Save yourself some pain.
 
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