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(Slate)   So is it 'fall' or is it 'autumn?' And why is it the only season with two names?   (slate.com) divider line 196
    More: Interesting, Samuel Johnson, English speakers  
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12278 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Oct 2012 at 4:15 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-01 12:20:11 PM
Why cant we just go back to using the Germanic "Harvest" for its name?
 
2012-10-01 12:22:21 PM
Either. Only people with nothing better to do care about this "issue."
 
2012-10-01 12:22:45 PM
You may appropriately use "autumn" in the following circumstances:

1) You speak with a British accent.
2) You are writing a poem in which the change of season is being compared to the stages of life.
3) The sentence you are using contains one or more of the following words: "whom," "irregardless," "apropos," "whilst," or "saturnine."
4) You are attending some sort of equestrian event that involves floppy hats.
5) You are holding some sort of cup with an extended pinkie finger.

In almost every other instance, "fall" is the correct term.
 
2012-10-01 12:23:51 PM
Blame the British and their fancy English.
 
2012-10-01 12:37:01 PM
Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?
 
2012-10-01 01:04:44 PM
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-10-01 01:11:47 PM
I call summer 'Shpadoinklefest'.
 
2012-10-01 01:22:20 PM
Autumnal sounds a lot better than fallish, or fally.
 
2012-10-01 01:31:34 PM

brap: Autumnal sounds a lot better than fallish, or fally.


Came for "autumnal". Leaving satisfied.
 
2012-10-01 01:31:42 PM
It's pop.
 
2012-10-01 01:31:58 PM
Because Obama
 
2012-10-01 01:32:57 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?


bi-annual is every two years. Semi-annual is every 6 months
 
2012-10-01 01:43:12 PM

cretinbob: ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?

bi-annual is every two years. Semi-annual is every 6 months


You mean twice a year for biannual, no?
 
2012-10-01 01:47:40 PM
It's a bit of a mystery why the superfluous autumn persists


I blame Nat King Cole.
 
2012-10-01 01:49:53 PM

Mangoose: cretinbob: ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?

bi-annual is every two years. Semi-annual is every 6 months

You mean twice a year for biannual, no?


Yes. Every two years is biennial.
 
2012-10-01 01:55:08 PM
I like to call summer "phi slamma jamma time." But maybe that's just me.
 
2012-10-01 01:57:07 PM

GreenAdder: It's pop.


It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE
 
2012-10-01 02:05:17 PM

Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE


What about when it's coming out of a bubbler?
 
2012-10-01 02:14:28 PM
Autumnus!
 
2012-10-01 02:16:42 PM

God Is My Co-Pirate: Every two years is biennial.


Yeah, I wasn't going to repost to correct that. I have full faith and confidence that someone else would. Bi-annual is nothing. The correct word is biennial.

My wife and I were discussing this the other day. Autumn is a sub-season of Fall. She thinks it's the beginning,late August til the leaves fall, I think it's more the time when it's starting to get darker and colder after the leaves have gone, later October to beginning of Winter.
 
2012-10-01 02:28:10 PM
I always turn to the wisdom of Bernard (Barney) T. Dinosaur for the answer to this question.

♪♫ Oh tweedle opp a deedle opp a tweedle opp a dee
Our jackets, we're glad we brought 'em
Oh you can call it fall if that's what you please
But I say I like Autumn!♪♫
 
2012-10-01 02:29:26 PM
It's not. Growing up in southeast Texas we had both summer and hell, hell being the preferred.
 
2012-10-01 02:59:41 PM

timujin: It's not. Growing up in southeast Texas we had both summer and hell, hell being the preferred.


In Georgia we have spring and pollen between winter and summer.
 
2012-10-01 03:00:55 PM

choo: Autumnus!


For the rest of us!

We shall now commence Airing of Grievances to be followed by Feats of Strength!
 
2012-10-01 03:08:15 PM
I was more offended that TFA calls spring in french 'primetemps'. WTF?
 
2012-10-01 03:10:37 PM

AlanSmithee: I call summer 'Shpadoinklefest'.


And Winter is greeted by a singing of "Let's Build a Snowman"?
 
2012-10-01 03:19:03 PM

timujin: It's not. Growing up in southeast Texas we had both summer and hell, hell being the preferred.


My uncles take on the old "we only have two seasons here in Texas: summer and Hurricane season" was "WTF does it matter what season it is? You've got the air conditioner set to 65 degrees either way."
 
2012-10-01 03:46:00 PM

cretinbob: God Is My Co-Pirate: Every two years is biennial.

Yeah, I wasn't going to repost to correct that. I have full faith and confidence that someone else would. Bi-annual is nothing. The correct word is biennial.

My wife and I were discussing this the other day. Autumn is a sub-season of Fall. She thinks it's the beginning,late August til the leaves fall, I think it's more the time when it's starting to get darker and colder after the leaves have gone, later October to beginning of Winter.


Well you wrote biannual not biennial, and mw defines both. So it actually exists, if that's what you're saying?
 
2012-10-01 04:08:00 PM
FTA: Fall is better on the merits than autumn, in every way: it is short

Autumn= 6 letters
Winter = 6 letters
Summer = 6 letters
Spring = 6 letters

I don't see how fall being "short" makes it preferable.

(I don't really care which word anyone prefers, but that struck me as a really silly argument. I can bear diversity in the names of the seasons, but I've been on Fark for too long to let a stupid argument pass without comment.)
 
2012-10-01 04:15:13 PM

FloydA: FTA: Fall is better on the merits than autumn, in every way: it is short

Autumn= 6 letters
Winter = 6 letters
Summer = 6 letters
Spring = 6 letters

I don't see how fall being "short" makes it preferable.

(I don't really care which word anyone prefers, but that struck me as a really silly argument. I can bear diversity in the names of the seasons, but I've been on Fark for too long to let a stupid argument pass without comment.)


Its an argument about elitism.

Its a vulgar Germanic term versus an educated Romantic word. There will always be this argument.
 
2012-10-01 04:17:50 PM
I call Autumn "The Merciful End to Yet Another Hideous Mets Season" but that might be a regional thing
 
2012-10-01 04:18:24 PM

Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE


The only thing that we call "Coke" in DC is Coke...oh and coke (sniffle). But the correct term for the carbonated beverage is "soda".
 
2012-10-01 04:21:05 PM
I don't care what you call it, but it's still farking hot.

2012 is going to be the year of the endless summer, at this rate.
 
2012-10-01 04:21:07 PM
It's because I touch myself at night. Sorry about that.

/no i'm not
 
2012-10-01 04:21:21 PM
Does anyone say "winter, spring, summer, or autumn"?

For me autumn isn't a season, it's a shorter time, and more of a feeling in the air.

Though here in north Mexico (aka San Antonio) we have two seasons, hellfire and fall. Don't get much winter or spring. Fall lasts from November until April. Everything else is summer.
 
2012-10-01 04:21:21 PM
www.buddytv.com 
"Why is it the only season with two names? And what's the deal with airline food?"
 
2012-10-01 04:21:39 PM

FloydA: FTA: Fall is better on the merits than autumn, in every way: it is short

Autumn= 6 letters
Winter = 6 letters
Summer = 6 letters
Spring = 6 letters

I don't see how fall being "short" makes it preferable.

(I don't really care which word anyone prefers, but that struck me as a really silly argument. I can bear diversity in the names of the seasons, but I've been on Fark for too long to let a stupid argument pass without comment.)


Autumn= 2 syllables
Winter = 2 syllables
Summer = 2 syllables
Spring = 1 syllable

Fall = 1 syllable

/why measure length with letters?
 
2012-10-01 04:21:41 PM
I never met a stripper named "Fall".
 
2012-10-01 04:23:06 PM
Fall. Think about it...how many times have you seen leaves autumn off of the trees? Never! So there you are. It is fall. Autumn is some hippy kid's name.
 
TWX
2012-10-01 04:23:28 PM

AlanSmithee: I call summer 'Shpadoinklefest'.


We call it, "Holy balls it's hot outside."
 
2012-10-01 04:23:50 PM

DROxINxTHExWIND: Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE

The only thing that we call "Coke" in DC is Coke...oh and coke (sniffle). But the correct term for the carbonated beverage is "soda".


I tend to call it coke (partly because I actually do prefer Coke), but soda is completely acceptable. Pop just sounds completely stupid, and there's no excuse for it.
 
2012-10-01 04:24:17 PM
I prefer to say autumn. It just sounds better. Also, describing things as "autumnal" sounds better than "fall-like."
 
2012-10-01 04:24:21 PM
In my part of Canada we have:
Winter and Roadwork...there also used to be a season called hockey but I think global warning killed it.
 
2012-10-01 04:24:30 PM

cretinbob: God Is My Co-Pirate: Every two years is biennial.

Yeah, I wasn't going to repost to correct that. I have full faith and confidence that someone else would. Bi-annual is nothing. The correct word is biennial.

My wife and I were discussing this the other day. Autumn is a sub-season of Fall. She thinks it's the beginning,late August til the leaves fall, I think it's more the time when it's starting to get darker and colder after the leaves have gone, later October to beginning of Winter.


Get a divorce...
 
2012-10-01 04:24:37 PM

cman: Its a vulgar Germanic term versus an educated Romantic word. There will always be this argument.


Until the nuclear apocalypse. Then they will be arguing about whether "Periplaneta Americana" or "Cockroach" is the appropriate term for our radioactive overlords.
 
2012-10-01 04:25:57 PM
Well there is "Winter" and "GODDAMMIT I'M FREEZING MY FARKING ASS OFF OUT HERE"
 
2012-10-01 04:26:06 PM
Using the "interesting" tag is a bit of a stretch, eh, Subby?
 
2012-10-01 04:28:10 PM

Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE


That's just ass backwards. When ordering in a restaurant do you say "I'll have a Diet Pepsi Coke"?
 
2012-10-01 04:28:13 PM

HighZoolander: /why measure length with letters?


Isn't there a tattooed penis joke out there somewhere.
 
2012-10-01 04:29:44 PM
"Spring ahead, Autumn back" doesn't make any sense. Just saying.
 
2012-10-01 04:29:49 PM

highendmighty: HighZoolander: /why measure length with letters?

Isn't there a tattooed penis joke out there somewhere.


WENDY
 
2012-10-01 04:29:50 PM
Over here, fall is called rainy season. It then goes into winter which is known as the stormy season. It eventually transitions into spring which we call the "son of a biatch, is the rain ever going to stop!" season. Then comes summer when everything manages to dry out just in time for the rainy season to start up again.

/Circle of life and all that.
 
2012-10-01 04:30:39 PM

skullkrusher: Isn't there a tattooed penis joke out there somewhere.


Yes, he's called Travis Barker.
 
2012-10-01 04:30:56 PM
www.kinderart.com
 
2012-10-01 04:31:28 PM
gray or grey?
 
2012-10-01 04:32:30 PM

browntimmy: Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE

That's just ass backwards. When ordering in a restaurant do you say "I'll have a Diet Pepsi Coke"?


First off, get out of here with your "diet" crap. Second, obviously not. You also don't say "I'll have a Pepsi soda" or "I'll have a Pepsi pop". You just order a Pepsi. The issue isn't what you call a specific item or brand, it's what you use as the generic catch-all. If you ask for a Kleenex, you're not going to flip your shiat if someone gives you another brand.
 
2012-10-01 04:33:17 PM
i consider this time late summer. once hurricane season is officially over, then it's fall... fall last until lent, which marks the beginning of spring. spring lasts until hurricane season starts (also known as "summer", which lasts about 8 months).
 
2012-10-01 04:33:57 PM
Summer has two names: Summer and ZOMGHOT
Winter has two names: Winter and ZOMGICE
Spring has two names: Spring and +++ATH+++ CARRIER LOST.
 
2012-10-01 04:34:17 PM
And why is it the only season with two names?

spring = sperm-term

subby = horrid failure

; ]
 
2012-10-01 04:34:18 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?


Being Mormon I feel compelled to answer ths one actually. semi annual is twice a year and bi annual is every two years.
 
2012-10-01 04:34:44 PM

highendmighty: HighZoolander: /why measure length with letters?

Isn't there a tattooed penis joke out there somewhere.


I should point out that words with lots of syllables are more of a mouthful
 
2012-10-01 04:35:40 PM
Fall.

Go Saxon or go home.
 
2012-10-01 04:36:16 PM
I'm lying in bed in my frumpy, flannel pants listening to the rain.
So I'm getting a cozy kick....
 
2012-10-01 04:37:06 PM
The whole "pants" thing meaning underwear in Britain is an example of how dumb they are about what was once their language.

"Pants" comes from "underpants". As in under PANTS. or if you prefer UNDER PANTS. They're warn under your pants.

Don't even get me started on rubbers.
 
2012-10-01 04:37:24 PM

Cythraul: Blame the British and their fancy English.


We used to say Fall in Britain too until about 100-150 years ago when it was updated to Autumn. Language changes like that over time.

We will not give up say dual carriageway though!

Autumn is more common as a girl's name in the US apparently.
 
2012-10-01 04:38:27 PM
In the 12th and 13th centuries, spring was called lent or lenten

It's still "lente" in Dutch.
Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).
 
2012-10-01 04:39:57 PM

skullkrusher: highendmighty: HighZoolander: /why measure length with letters?

Isn't there a tattooed penis joke out there somewhere.

WENDY


That's the one. Thank you :)
 
2012-10-01 04:40:45 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: Fall.

Go Saxon or go home.


Considering how farked up the English language is, we really cannot be sure if "Fall" came from Saxon. England was colonized by many western Germanic peoples (Angles, Saxons, Jutes, Frisians, Franks, and more). Then the Viking settlements brought in Northern Germanic people, further infusing our tongue with their lexicon. When the Norman conquest happened, those who spoke the educated English were decimated leading the language to only the language of the simple folk. English itself is a end result of language merger and cultural conquest.
 
2012-10-01 04:43:21 PM

reillan: Summer has two names: Summer and ZOMGHOT
Winter has two names: Winter and ZOMGICE
Spring has two names: Spring and +++ATH+++ CARRIER LOST.


Cable-Fiber Networking Seasons
Summer: Shiat is stretching due to the heat. Adjust levels.
Winter: Shiat is contracting & breaking due to cold. Truck roll to fix.
Spring: Dammit they stole the fiber line because they thought it was copper. Truck roll to replace.
Fall: Dammit they shot at the doves, missed, and broke the line. Truck roll to fix and 4 hours to find the damn thing.
 
2012-10-01 04:45:00 PM

Badgers: Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).


Huh. I don't suppose you know the etymology of "festival"? If the origin of "harvest" is "herbest/hervest" (herfest?), might be 'fest'ival comes from the same root, meaning something like "harvest celebration".
 
2012-10-01 04:45:19 PM
I thought Summer was also called 'Dammitshot'
 
2012-10-01 04:45:57 PM

Last Man on Earth: Badgers: Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).

Huh. I don't suppose you know the etymology of "festival"? If the origin of "harvest" is "herbest/hervest" (herfest?), might be 'fest'ival comes from the same root, meaning something like "harvest celebration".


Sorry, Festival is pure Latin
 
2012-10-01 04:46:48 PM
blimey i want to go to britain and eat a pot noodle in the midst of autumn
 
2012-10-01 04:46:51 PM

cman: Last Man on Earth: Badgers: Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).

Huh. I don't suppose you know the etymology of "festival"? If the origin of "harvest" is "herbest/hervest" (herfest?), might be 'fest'ival comes from the same root, meaning something like "harvest celebration".

Sorry, Festival is pure Latin


...and has no connections to harvest. It is related to Feast, however
 
2012-10-01 04:51:54 PM
Fall refers to the pagan or prehistoric observation that the sun was falling into the underworld. Autumn is the name of the really hot red head girl that you roll in the leaves with while wearing tight warm sweaters.
 
2012-10-01 04:52:02 PM
White lady problems
 
2012-10-01 04:52:34 PM
It's whatever you want to call it. I've never met anyone from the U.S. or Britain that doesn't understand both terms.

/I say Autumn, but sometimes I say Fall.
 
2012-10-01 04:53:35 PM
It's becauase "Have a nice trip this Autumn" just sounds stupid.
 
2012-10-01 04:53:46 PM

Last Man on Earth: browntimmy: Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE

That's just ass backwards. When ordering in a restaurant do you say "I'll have a Diet Pepsi Coke"?

First off, get out of here with your "diet" crap. Second, obviously not. You also don't say "I'll have a Pepsi soda" or "I'll have a Pepsi pop". You just order a Pepsi. The issue isn't what you call a specific item or brand, it's what you use as the generic catch-all. If you ask for a Kleenex, you're not going to flip your shiat if someone gives you another brand.


Is club soda called club coke? Is root beer a coke? Orange soda?
 
2012-10-01 04:56:06 PM
A few responses above that autumnal (x) > fall (x). Where I grew up, people just say winter (x), and summer (x), but for spring it's almost always vernal (x) and for fall autumnal (x).

But then we also say soft drink... soda = club soda, and pop, depending on context is either an ice pop or lollipop.

/first time I visited TX I ordered a Coke, and the waitress asked what kind I wanted: Coke, orange Coke, or Dr. Pepper.
 
2012-10-01 04:56:25 PM
Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall are all Anglo-Saxon or Germanic in Origin.
Autumn came to us via the French and Latin. English almost always has at least two words for everything, not to mention two pronunciations and spellings. Think of all the word pairs you can such as gal (or gel) and girl, gormless and gummy, etc.--the language is full of words that came from two different sources. From Norman and Parisian French we get duplicates such as "guardian" and "warden", "warantee" and "guarantee", etc. (the hard sound is Norman, the soft is French).

English vocabulary is replete with words of latinate or anglo-saxon-germanic origin (including replete), although it has four times as many words of French-Norman origin than anglo-saxon. The Anglo Saxon words tend to be very basic vocabulary that changes little over time. French and latinized vocabulary never displaced words like "moon", "day", "house", "cow", etc.

Winter is not very clearly related to hiver (French), but hivernis (Latin) does look a little closer because Latin is closer to Indo-European, the common ancestor of German and Latin and almost all European languages except Basque and maybe Roma.

Summer is clearly not derived from été (French) nor is it clearly derived from Latin. It is Germanic.

But why are three of these words Anglo-Saxon and only one Franco-Latinate? Who knows? The main reason is that the rear guard action against the new masters was able to hold out three quarters of the way on seasons, a fairly decent defence or defense.

Our days of the week are also mixed but Anglo-Saxon put up a better fight: Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday are all Anglo-Saxon-Germanic. Saturday alone is named after a classical god, Saturn. But in French, lundi, mardi, mercredi, jeudi, vendredi, and samdi and dimanche (dominicus, the Lord's Day) are all latinate. The origin tongues of France, like much of the population, were all but wiped out by the Romans.

Back in England, Fall went out of fashion because of the Franco-Norman upper classes, who said "automne" or "Autumn" and then because of middle class snobbery which used rules about which words you could use to attack their "betters" and their "inferiors" as they rose to power. Summer survived virtually unchanged, winter and spring were in between. Fall may have lost some ground due to harvest, in fact. You could pretty avoid talking about the season at all.

The ancestors of many Americans and Canadians came from places like Yorkshire which were conservative and economically backward even in the 1600s and 1700s, and thus produced a large number of economic refugees or "settlers", "planters" and "colonials" as they are called when they are not "immigrants" or "illegals", which is to say, johnney-come-latelies with browner skin.

Fall is still used in England but mostly in the North or less formal speech. The more Frenchified and Normanized South uses Autumn. This is subject to change without notice, and of course, there's always somebody trying to put on airs or else conceal their posh backgrounds in a form of reverse snobbery.

Many of the things that the British deplore about American English are not peculiar to American English but are mere slightly old-fashioned or regional. Given the number of Yorkshire ancestors I have found while investigating my deep and widespread colonial American roots, I would say that us North Americans come by our linguistic quirks and customs honestly enough. From the look of things, both sides of the Atlantic Mutual Misunderstanding Society are roughly evenly matched, with both sides more inventive in slang and novelty than they would care to admit in polite society.

The conservative classes like to think that they are conservative in language as well as traditions and politics, but there's little evidence to back them up. Their traditions are often surprisingly recent innovations, their language thoroughly riddled with modern slang and phase shifts of various kinds, and their politics not very conservative of anything except the interests of the few who play politics to win.
 
2012-10-01 04:57:05 PM

Pocket Ninja: You may appropriately use "autumn" in the following circumstances:

1) You speak with a British accent.
2) You are writing a poem in which the change of season is being compared to the stages of life.
3) The sentence you are using contains one or more of the following words: "whom," "irregardless," "apropos," "whilst," or "saturnine."
4) You are attending some sort of equestrian event that involves floppy hats.
5) You are holding some sort of cup with an extended pinkie finger.

In almost every other instance, "fall" is the correct term.


frikkin beat me to it with his high falutin' verbage.
 
2012-10-01 04:57:34 PM
Spring forward, Fall behind.... Has to do with time
 
2012-10-01 04:57:44 PM

Tired_of_the_BS: A few responses above that autumnal (x) > fall (x). Where I grew up, people just say winter (x), and summer (x), but for spring it's almost always vernal (x) and for fall autumnal (x).

But then we also say soft drink... soda = club soda, and pop, depending on context is either an ice pop or lollipop.

/first time I visited TX I ordered a Coke, and the waitress asked what kind I wanted: Coke, orange Coke, or Dr. Pepper.


they make ORANGE coke? blimey

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-01 04:58:43 PM

nursedude: In my part of Canada we have:
Winter and Roadwork...there also used to be a season called hockey but I think global warning killed it.


We call them "Road Removal" and "Snow Construction" in Minnesota, but the theory is the same.
 
2012-10-01 04:59:24 PM
It's called snowbird season, subby.
 
2012-10-01 05:00:22 PM
If you live anywhere near or north of 45 it is patently obvious. There are more than four seasons.

In order : Winter, Mud, Spring, Blackflies, 4th of July, Autumn, Fall, Stick, Winter.....

Winter = obvious
Mud = not quite spring but starting to thaw, frost heaves, ice jams on rivers
Spring = when the first green grass starts to appear
Blackflies= warm enough to go out but you can't because of the blood sucking bugs
4th of July = Maybe warm enough to take off the sweater.
Autumn = golden rod in full bloom, ragweed pollen high, tall grass in fields turns yellow
Fall = Leaves are falling off trees
Stick = no leaves on trees but not cold enough for snow
 
2012-10-01 05:00:52 PM

God Is My Co-Pirate: Mangoose: cretinbob: ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?

bi-annual is every two years. Semi-annual is every 6 months

You mean twice a year for biannual, no?

Yes. Every two years is biennial.


www.tvparty.com
That's tree times a yeaaah
 
2012-10-01 05:04:00 PM
half of fall all of winter and half of spring if SEASON in florida
 
2012-10-01 05:04:20 PM
My dog calls them (in decreasing order of preference):

White (Winter)
Pounce (Fall)
Wet (Spring)
Hot (Summer)
 
2012-10-01 05:05:34 PM
My year has only 2 seasons:

Hotandshiattytime and Ahhhhhhhhh......
 
2012-10-01 05:06:56 PM
Three names subby, or did you forget Octoberfest?
 
2012-10-01 05:09:07 PM
Move to Seattle. We don't have seasons, just a period of more wet and a period of less wet.

/actually it's quite pleasant but it's obligatory
 
2012-10-01 05:10:36 PM
Anyone with a good education knows that it's Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity, Summer is for the long vacation.

/peasants
 
2012-10-01 05:10:44 PM

We shall give Spring an additional name:

Boiyoiyoiyoingg!!

images.wikia.com
 
2012-10-01 05:10:52 PM

Last Man on Earth: Badgers: Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).

Huh. I don't suppose you know the etymology of "festival"? If the origin of "harvest" is "herbest/hervest" (herfest?), might be 'fest'ival comes from the same root, meaning something like "harvest celebration".


Wikipedia is magic.
 
2012-10-01 05:11:11 PM

Nightsweat: The whole "pants" thing meaning underwear in Britain is an example of how dumb they are about what was once their language.

"Pants" comes from "underpants". As in under PANTS. or if you prefer UNDER PANTS. They're warn under your pants.

Don't even get me started on rubbers.


"Pants" in the American sense comes from the French, "pantaloons", which were the type of loose trousers worn by the Turks (parachute pants are merely an exagerated sub-type). Underpants is clearly related but not the source. American English was briefly under the spell of French thanks to the French assistance (which was decisive at several points in time, including the Surrender of Cornwallis) during the Revolution.

Early politics was split between francophiles and francophobes, or conversely, anglophiles and anglophobes. Of course, we now know that they are the same thing, namely a francophobe is a francophile who has met a Frenchman, and an anglophobe is an anglophile who has met the English.

The old British word "trousers" is derived from "trewes", which were more like the American cowboy's "chaps" in that they were not originally joined up, but were leggings of coarse cloath or leather to protect the horseman's legs from brush and other threats.

Like "scissors", trousers are plural because there used to be two of them. ("Scissors" are still called "ciseaux" in French, which also means chisels. Two chisels, bound together at the fulcrum, become scissors.)

British usage often sneaks into commercialese in North America because of snob appeal. Thus habidashery often has an antique and posh air about it, with a sort of stilted language of its own. You are more likely to hear "trousers" in a posh tailor's shop or boutique than J.C. Penney.

Other examples of historically determined differences between the British and Americans include the pronunciation of certain words, such as "Duke".

The British pronounce it with a nearly French vowel, while the Americans use the briefly popular Regency pronunciation which the Beaux of the time of Prince George, later King George IV, used. DOOK is also the pronunciation in the North of England. It's our Yorkshire forbears again. If you want to do a Yorkshire accent, ham it up a bit. Some Americans and Canadians have a good head start on the English when regional accents are in play.

Others shouldn't even try to fake a British accent, howsoever humble or out-of-the-way. Language is in constant flux and you've moved on too far to look back.

Conversely, the British are totally clueless when they do American accents because they don't realize there is more than one despite having about 66 regional dialects of their own, and several layers of each.
 
2012-10-01 05:12:47 PM
mfw Englishmen call Autumn "Coldy-Mopey Leaf fall offy"
 
2012-10-01 05:14:01 PM
Interesting

i48.tinypic.com
 
2012-10-01 05:16:00 PM
I'd prefer to abolish Fall and Autumn and just go with what's really important: Football Season or Oktoberfest.
 
2012-10-01 05:19:15 PM

idsfa: My dog calls them (in decreasing order of preference):

White (Winter)
Pounce (Fall)
Wet (Spring)
Hot (Summer)


Your dog is Mitt Romney?
 
2012-10-01 05:20:22 PM

CruJones: Does anyone say "winter, spring, summer, or autumn"?

For me autumn isn't a season, it's a shorter time, and more of a feeling in the air.

Though here in north Mexico (aka San Antonio) we have two seasons, hellfire and fall. Don't get much winter or spring. Fall lasts from November until April. Everything else is summer.


I do. I didn't grow up in the US. I had no idea what "fall" was when I moved here. I still feel stupid if I say it. It's Autumn.
 
2012-10-01 05:22:41 PM
In the Maritime Provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island) and Newfoundland, you can hear innumerable local and regional accents because so many different groups of people settled small outports and villages in groups. There are English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh influences that would make you swear you were in the UK, while American influences from Maine to at least New Jersey or Pennsylvani have also played a role in the not too distant pass. My family tree is a typical mixture of the four British races, various American colonials, both pre- and post- Revolutionary (in many cases during the Revolution), as well as some influence from Old France and New France.

While Standard Canadian English can be heard from coast to coast and on American TV and radio, the more rural parts of the country have yet to meld together even as much as the UK or France have over the centuries.

It's weird, wild and wonderful, with British and American usages at war with each other for so long that both sides have forgotten which side is which.

Newfoundland alone has produced dictionaries and encyclopedias (including former Premier Joseph Smallwood's) to cover the rich and bizarre language and culture that was produced when so many different cultures clashed and intermingled.

Nothing odd about that, it happens all the time and everywhere, but for people used to living in their own bubble of dominant Englishes, these out-land Englishes can be fascinating and horrifying by turns. You never know when you are going to hear something that will carry you back to former centuries and almost foreign places.

I like to say that I have lived in at least four centuries (the 1600s, 1700s, 1800s, 1900s) but some of the language, grammar, customs and culture I have encountered since I was a child is much older than even that.

Nothing ever totally dies, not even the Middle Ages. It is all now and here.

I've actually participated in the hanging of May baskets, the chivarie of married couples, and other customs that died out elsewhere centuries ago. I've heard words that Rabelais and Montaigne would recognize but which are unknown even in rural France today.

It's a great place to be from, as they say in Canada.
 
2012-10-01 05:24:06 PM
Screw Fall and Autumn, To Americans this time of year is known as "Football Season"
 
2012-10-01 05:29:59 PM
Nice to see it's not just the Muslims that give more of a shiate than I do.
 
2012-10-01 05:30:21 PM

Last Man on Earth: browntimmy: Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE

That's just ass backwards. When ordering in a restaurant do you say "I'll have a Diet Pepsi Coke"?

First off, get out of here with your "diet" crap. Second, obviously not. You also don't say "I'll have a Pepsi soda" or "I'll have a Pepsi pop". You just order a Pepsi. The issue isn't what you call a specific item or brand, it's what you use as the generic catch-all. If you ask for a Kleenex, you're not going to flip your shiat if someone gives you another brand.


Ao what kind of Coke did you want? Pepsi coke?
 
2012-10-01 05:40:26 PM
TFA: However, in the end the Fowlers warned that it was too late. "We once had as good a right to it as the Americans," they wrote, "but we have chosen to let the right lapse, and to use the word now is no better than larceny."

"The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary."
--James D. Nicoll
 
2012-10-01 05:41:30 PM
Der Herbst - Eine wunderschöne und farbenprächtige Jahreszeit im Jahr. Die Abende werden länger, der Sommer ist vollbracht, die Natur bereitet sich unermütlich auf ihre Erholung vor. Ein Hauch von Melancholie liegt in der Luft.
 
f2f
2012-10-01 05:41:40 PM

Pocket Ninja: "irregardless,"


really? i had hopes in you, man. high hopes! :-( 

HIGH.

HOPES
 
2012-10-01 05:42:00 PM

FloydA: FTA: Fall is better on the merits than autumn, in every way: it is short

Autumn= 6 letters
Winter = 6 letters
Summer = 6 letters
Spring = 6 letters

I don't see how fall being "short" makes it preferable.

(I don't really care which word anyone prefers, but that struck me as a really silly argument. I can bear diversity in the names of the seasons, but I've been on Fark for too long to let a stupid argument pass without comment.)


It not even really short. Fall is short for "the fall of leaves." It just people got lazy and dropped most of the saying.

I personally think it is because no one can bloody spell Autumn properly.
 
2012-10-01 05:51:05 PM
I have popped my head in these threads (Romantic v Germanic) and always root for the Germanic side. There is a reason for this. It is not out of xenophobia. I am an American of French/Italian descent, so me ragging on French and Latin languages is something that I can do and not be faulted for. I support a Germanic English because of my cultural ancestry, not my blood ancestry. I am a proud American who takes pride in our history. Prior to the 1600s, our history was all about England, as we were British citizens. When the 1600s began we started diverging in our history, but it wasnt until 1776 when we brushed off our Englishness and became American.

I take pride in my cultural English ancestry. I am of not English or Germanic blood (that I know of, but I could have Frankish blood as I have blue eyes (or I have a Slav in my background(or even a Viking, but that is still of Germanic descent))), but that does not mean that I cannot be one of your own.
 
2012-10-01 05:53:22 PM

cretinbob: ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?

bi-annual is every two years. Semi-annual is every 6 months


uhm...

bi-ennial (or biennial) is every two years

bi-annual (biannual) is twice per year, but not neccessarily every six months (semi-annual)
 
2012-10-01 05:57:54 PM

DesertZephyr: cretinbob: ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?

bi-annual is every two years. Semi-annual is every 6 months

uhm...

bi-ennial (or biennial) is every two years

bi-annual (biannual) is twice per year, but not neccessarily every six months (semi-annual)


mm..OK. Biannual just sounds like a non-word.
 
2012-10-01 05:58:51 PM
Bananaual?
 
2012-10-01 05:59:18 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?



Pants are semi-annual, trousers are bi-annular.
 
2012-10-01 06:01:11 PM

cretinbob: Bananaual?


yanno if you type too fast it comes out bi-anal...

NTTIAWWT
 
2012-10-01 06:05:03 PM

trappedspirit: White lady problems


i.imgur.com 

All this nomenclature is giving me the vapors.
 
2012-10-01 06:05:58 PM

Fish in a Barrel: TFA: However, in the end the Fowlers warned that it was too late. "We once had as good a right to it as the Americans," they wrote, "but we have chosen to let the right lapse, and to use the word now is no better than larceny."

"The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary."
--James D. Nicoll


That's why we end up with more than one stolen word for the same thing, like buffet and smorgasbord.
 
2012-10-01 06:06:23 PM
upload.wikimedia.org

Fall, cos I dun cain't spell tha autum.. autim.. an coz 5% of tha world sez fall an thats like half o dem.
 
2012-10-01 06:08:02 PM
Yeah, and what sort of mist did Puff frolick in?
Exactly.
 
2012-10-01 06:08:33 PM
Get your dollar bills out, gentlemen. Now dancing on the main stage, the lovely Autumn.

/Got nothin'.
 
2012-10-01 06:09:07 PM
It's Weasel Stomping Time

Link
 
2012-10-01 06:16:33 PM

DesertZephyr: cretinbob: Bananaual?

yanno if you type too fast it comes out bi-anal...

NTTIAWWT


25.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-10-01 06:26:53 PM

cretinbob: ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?

bi-annual is every two years. Semi-annual is every 6 months


What about a fortyear?
 
2012-10-01 06:29:53 PM

Last Man on Earth: browntimmy: Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE

That's just ass backwards. When ordering in a restaurant do you say "I'll have a Diet Pepsi Coke"?

First off, get out of here with your "diet" crap. Second, obviously not. You also don't say "I'll have a Pepsi soda" or "I'll have a Pepsi pop". You just order a Pepsi. The issue isn't what you call a specific item or brand, it's what you use as the generic catch-all. If you ask for a Kleenex, you're not going to flip your shiat if someone gives you another brand.


And you can't get a Pepsi Free. If you want a Pepsi you're gonna have to pay for it, pal.
 
2012-10-01 06:33:16 PM
Pocket Ninja: You may appropriately use "autumn" in the following circumstances:

1) You speak with a British accent.
2) You are writing a poem in which the change of season is being compared to the stages of life.
3) The sentence you are using contains one or more of the following words: "whom," "irregardless," "apropos," "whilst," or "saturnine."
4) You are attending some sort of equestrian event that involves floppy hats.
5) You are holding some sort of cup with an extended pinkie finger.

In almost every other instance, "fall" is the correct term.


THIS
 
2012-10-01 06:35:59 PM
Winter has 2 names as well. 'Winter' and '5 MONTHS OF FU*KING BULLSHIAT'.
 
2012-10-01 06:45:42 PM

Pocket Ninja: You may appropriately use "autumn" in the following circumstances:

1) You speak with a British accent.
2) You are writing a poem in which the change of season is being compared to the stages of life.
3) The sentence you are using contains one or more of the following words: "whom," "irregardless," "apropos," "whilst," or "saturnine."
4) You are attending some sort of equestrian event that involves floppy hats.
5) You are holding some sort of cup with an extended pinkie finger.

In almost every other instance, "fall" is the correct term.


I use apropos regularly and my whole mother's side is British going back centuries. Can I use it?
 
2012-10-01 06:58:03 PM

Pocket Ninja: You may appropriately use "autumn" in the following circumstances:

1) You speak with a British accent.
2) You are writing a poem in which the change of season is being compared to the stages of life.
3) The sentence you are using contains one or more of the following words: "whom," "irregardless," "apropos," "whilst," or "saturnine."
4) You are attending some sort of equestrian event that involves floppy hats.
5) You are holding some sort of cup with an extended pinkie finger.

In almost every other instance, "fall" is the correct term.


I remember a time
My frail, virgin mind
Watched the crimson sunrise
Imagined what it might find
Life was filled with wonder
I felt the warm wind blow
I must explore the boundaries
Transcend the depth of winter's snow

Innocence caressing me
I never felt so young before
There was so much life in me
Still I longed to search for more

But those days are gone now
Changed like a leaf on a tree
Blown away forever
Into the cool autumn breeze
The snow has now fallen
And my son's not so bright
I struggle to hold on
With the last of my might

In my den of inequity
Viciousness and subtlety
Struggle to ease the pain
Struggle to find the same

Ignorance surrounding me
I've never been so filled with fear
All my life's been drained from me
The end is drawing near...
 
2012-10-01 07:07:10 PM

Klom Dark: Into the cool autumn breeze
The snow has now fallen


Was supposed to be:

Into the cool autumn breeze
The snow has now fallen 

// Uses both, so there...
 
2012-10-01 07:12:45 PM

cman: FloydA: FTA: Fall is better on the merits than autumn, in every way: it is short

Autumn= 6 letters
Winter = 6 letters
Summer = 6 letters
Spring = 6 letters

I don't see how fall being "short" makes it preferable.

(I don't really care which word anyone prefers, but that struck me as a really silly argument. I can bear diversity in the names of the seasons, but I've been on Fark for too long to let a stupid argument pass without comment.)

Its an argument about elitism.

Its a vulgar Germanic term versus an educated Romantic word. There will always be this argument.


You and I have talked about this issue before- the difference between "low-class" Anglo-Saxon and "high-class" Franco-Roman? And why some words are considered "acceptable," while perfectly effective cognates are considered "profanity."

Or am I mis-remembering and confusing you with some other TFer?

(IDK, I'm usually drunk when I visit Fark. I think it was you that I was discussing historical linguistics and class-linked vocabulary- maybe I'm completely wrong- memory is not my strong suit. Anyway, fascinating subject. Drew doesn't filter "Feces," "intercourse," "sodomite," or "vagina." but the Anglo-Saxon cognates all get modified.)
 
2012-10-01 07:16:21 PM

FloydA: cman: FloydA: FTA: Fall is better on the merits than autumn, in every way: it is short

Autumn= 6 letters
Winter = 6 letters
Summer = 6 letters
Spring = 6 letters

I don't see how fall being "short" makes it preferable.

(I don't really care which word anyone prefers, but that struck me as a really silly argument. I can bear diversity in the names of the seasons, but I've been on Fark for too long to let a stupid argument pass without comment.)

Its an argument about elitism.

Its a vulgar Germanic term versus an educated Romantic word. There will always be this argument.

You and I have talked about this issue before- the difference between "low-class" Anglo-Saxon and "high-class" Franco-Roman? And why some words are considered "acceptable," while perfectly effective cognates are considered "profanity."

Or am I mis-remembering and confusing you with some other TFer?

(IDK, I'm usually drunk when I visit Fark. I think it was you that I was discussing historical linguistics and class-linked vocabulary- maybe I'm completely wrong- memory is not my strong suit. Anyway, fascinating subject. Drew doesn't filter "Feces," "intercourse," "sodomite," or "vagina." but the Anglo-Saxon cognates all get modified.)


Every thread about discussion of English and its origins is something that I always pop in. We most likely have talked about it before, and that is kind of something that I do talk about. Your memory is most likely right, but I cannot recall the specifics of our discussions.
 
2012-10-01 07:21:43 PM
nursedude


In my part of Canada we have:
Winter and Roadwork...there also used to be a season called hockey but I think global warning killed it.


Saskatchewan?

/out west we have the wet season and the wetter season....
 
2012-10-01 07:23:51 PM

Girion47: gray or grey?


1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-01 07:32:11 PM
It's Equinox.
 
2012-10-01 07:32:35 PM

nursedude: In my part of Canada we have:
Winter and Roadwork...there also used to be a season called hockey but I think global warning killed it.


I like this better - it gets right to the point.
 
2012-10-01 07:32:51 PM
"Have a nice trip, see you next autumn." Yeah, doesn't work.
 
2012-10-01 07:35:15 PM
Living in Buffalo, we had pre-Winter, Winter, post-Winter, Summerish.

Living in Florida, we have Wet Season, Dry Season.
 
2012-10-01 07:44:21 PM
It's simpler in some places, like Alaska, where "Winter" is pronounced as "today".
 
2012-10-01 07:46:50 PM
Our days of the week are also mixed but Anglo-Saxon put up a better fight: Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday are all Anglo-Saxon-Germanic. Saturday alone is named after a classical god, Saturn. But in French, lundi, mardi, mercredi, jeudi, vendredi, and samdi and dimanche (dominicus, the Lord's Day) are all latinate. The origin tongues of France, like much of the population, were all but wiped out by the Romans.

The English names are actually the translation of the Latin Names only using Anglo-Saxon Gods.

Dominica obviously comes after the adoption of Christianity and the move of the sabbath from the seventh day to the First. Before that, it was "diem solis," Sun Day.

The seven days of the week are named after the seven "Planets" of antiquity. The Sun, the Moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus and Saturn. So, Diem Solis, diem Lunae, diem Martis, diem Mercurii, diem Jovis, diem Veneris, diem Saturni Hence the French lundi, mardi, mercoledi, jeudi, samedi "Sabbath day" and Dimanche.

Now the equivalent anglo Saxon Pagan gods for the planets were: Tyr or Tiw, the God of War. Odin or Woden, whom the Romans accepted as Mercury. Thor, the King of Gods,like Romes Jupiter. Frigg (in Middle English, final 'g's become 'y's.) the goddess of Love, Venus. No Germanic equivalent of Saturn.
 
2012-10-01 07:52:38 PM

sunsawed: Our days of the week are also mixed but Anglo-Saxon put up a better fight: Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday are all Anglo-Saxon-Germanic. Saturday alone is named after a classical god, Saturn. But in French, lundi, mardi, mercredi, jeudi, vendredi, and samdi and dimanche (dominicus, the Lord's Day) are all latinate. The origin tongues of France, like much of the population, were all but wiped out by the Romans.

The English names are actually the translation of the Latin Names only using Anglo-Saxon Gods.

Dominica obviously comes after the adoption of Christianity and the move of the sabbath from the seventh day to the First. Before that, it was "diem solis," Sun Day.

The seven days of the week are named after the seven "Planets" of antiquity. The Sun, the Moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus and Saturn. So, Diem Solis, diem Lunae, diem Martis, diem Mercurii, diem Jovis, diem Veneris, diem Saturni Hence the French lundi, mardi, mercoledi, jeudi, samedi "Sabbath day" and Dimanche.

Now the equivalent anglo Saxon Pagan gods for the planets were: Tyr or Tiw, the God of War. Odin or Woden, whom the Romans accepted as Mercury. Thor, the King of Gods,like Romes Jupiter. Frigg (in Middle English, final 'g's become 'y's.) the goddess of Love, Venus. No Germanic equivalent of Saturn.


*Mjollnir'd*
 
2012-10-01 07:59:26 PM
In Australia most of the trees do not loose their leaves, therefore there is no 'fall'. We call it autumn.
 
2012-10-01 08:01:25 PM

Girion47: gray or grey?


My name is Gray... from what I understand, Gray with an "A" is the American spelling. I kind of wish it was spelled Grey, as that might lead to fewer people mistaking it for Gary. I'd probably get Greg, though, so it makes little difference.
 
2012-10-01 08:16:54 PM

Tired_of_the_BS: A few responses above that autumnal (x) > fall (x). Where I grew up, people just say winter (x), and summer (x), but for spring it's almost always vernal (x) and for fall autumnal (x).



img2.etsystatic.com

Approves.
 
2012-10-01 08:23:34 PM

FloydA: FTA: Fall is better on the merits than autumn, in every way: it is short

Autumn= 6 letters
Winter = 6 letters
Summer = 6 letters
Spring = 6 letters

I don't see how fall being "short" makes it preferable.


Those are a lot shorter than "snowplow" and "road construction".
 
2012-10-01 08:36:39 PM
And what's with Yule being Saturnalia or Christmas now? Uppity Romans.
 
2012-10-01 08:41:56 PM

choo: Autumnus!


eunt domus?
 
2012-10-01 08:48:53 PM
Vernal
 
2012-10-01 09:02:53 PM
Relevant to her interests:

misfit120.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-10-01 09:03:24 PM

StymieMotJuste: Vernal


"Know wut I mean, Vern?"

"Autumnal, man."
 
2012-10-01 09:10:46 PM
whatever. it's your choice.
 
2012-10-01 09:22:47 PM
This is farking easy.

It's Fall when you're talking about the season.

It's Autumn when you've already got daughters named Summer, Spring and Winter.

You're welcome.
 
2012-10-01 09:23:32 PM
Because time travelling autistics savants from the future lobbied congress for their own season.

This is also why we have asshautism on Fark.
 
2012-10-01 09:40:16 PM
In Australia, anyone using 'Fall' instead of 'Autumn' would be accused of using an Americanism. It's very interesting to note that it's a traditional Saxon word which is arguably more historically accurate. I'll use it from now on just to make a smartarse of myself correcting those who correct me. I'll have to wait five months though - it's a delightful Spring in my part of the world right now.
 
2012-10-01 10:03:06 PM
Also in Australia there is an odd hatred of Halloween. I have twice witnessed a child being dressed down by a cranky older stranger in a shop for getting excited about Halloween costumes. "Its an American Holiday!!!! This is Australia!!!!"
 
2012-10-01 10:08:10 PM

Ravengirl: Also in Australia there is an odd hatred of Halloween. I have twice witnessed a child being dressed down by a cranky older stranger in a shop for getting excited about Halloween costumes. "Its an American Holiday!!!! This is Australia!!!!"


How sad :(
Halloween is a fun and unique holiday, and I love to see kids get excited about it like I did. I also tend to think that people who are willing to really get into it are probably more fun people :) Plus, nothing like a good sugar-and-alcohol-fueled costume party, hehe.
 
2012-10-01 10:35:03 PM

Bucky Katt: whatever. it's your choice.


I choose equinox.
 
2012-10-01 10:52:00 PM

Teufelaffe: idsfa: My dog calls them (in decreasing order of preference):

White (Winter)
Pounce (Fall)
Wet (Spring)
Hot (Summer)

Your dog is Mitt Romney?



Mittens knows nothing about hot, wet or pounce.
 
2012-10-01 10:54:53 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: I don't care what you call it, but it's still farking hot.

2012 is going to be the year of the endless summer, at this rate.


Speak for yourself, right now I've begun the annual war with myself to see how long I can last before the heat gets turned on. So far as it has only been in the 40's an 50's overnight, it's been okay and I've not needed the heat, just an extra blanket.

/I'll probably give in when it gets down into the 30's overnight in a few days as has been predicted.
 
2012-10-01 11:03:46 PM
i always thought autumn was early in the season (august, september) and fall was late in the season (october, nov)
 
2012-10-01 11:11:09 PM
Newsflash there are 5 main English speaking nations (6 if you include India but I doubt that is worth debating at this point except to point out they actually have the highest english speaking population)

2 of them call it "fall" (USA and Canada, Canada less so)

3 of them call it Autumn
 
2012-10-01 11:25:25 PM

Slartibartfaster: Newsflash there are 5 main English speaking nations (6 if you include India but I doubt that is worth debating at this point except to point out they actually have the highest english speaking population)

2 of them call it "fall" (USA and Canada, Canada less so)

3 of them call it Autumn


And in Canada we go either way. Soda Pop.

/Just don't call the roof a 'Ruff'.
//By accident, not on accident
///you scratch the itch, you do not itch said itch.
////DD/MM/YY
 
2012-10-01 11:32:17 PM
What about Indian Summer? This season has three, not two names. FARK political correctness.
 
2012-10-01 11:39:21 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-01 11:40:25 PM
Fall=Autumn=Sweaterpuppies
 
2012-10-01 11:58:34 PM

FloydA: FTA: Fall is better on the merits than autumn, in every way: it is short

Autumn= 6 letters
Winter = 6 letters
Summer = 6 letters
Spring = 6 letters

I don't see how fall being "short" makes it preferable.

(I don't really care which word anyone prefers, but that struck me as a really silly argument. I can bear diversity in the names of the seasons, but I've been on Fark for too long to let a stupid argument pass without comment.)


I think you have me on 'ignore', so you can't see this, but you've just farked my OCD. I'll never be able to call it 'fall' again*.

* in writing. Spoken, 'Fall' still works for me as it is a single syllable and the opposite of 'Spring', also a single syllable

/winter & summer: opposites and two syllables
 
2012-10-02 12:01:30 AM

Ravengirl: Also in Australia there is an odd hatred of Halloween. I have twice witnessed a child being dressed down by a cranky older stranger in a shop for getting excited about Halloween costumes. "Its an American Holiday!!!! This is Australia!!!!"


Well, it kind of is, as it has been promoted. I grew up in Australia, born there in 1965. There was no Halloween. I was taken to the US in 75, and halloween was completely foreign to me. Never liked it much.
 
2012-10-02 12:19:23 AM
I call it Fall because I can do whatever I want.
 
2012-10-02 12:31:51 AM
English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European and Germanic languages do not get along.

Is it a chair or stool? They don't respond to different types of resting apparatus; they're two words with the exact same meaning.

Is it a door or a portal?

Fall or Autumn?

This goes on for a good 20% of the language.
 
2012-10-02 01:59:38 AM

Spartacus Outlaw: Never liked it much.


That's cool, and I can understand not wanting to participate in a holiday you didn't grow up with. However, I can't undersatnd hating a holiday so much you harass little children for wanting to play dress-ups.
 
2012-10-02 02:19:22 AM

Ravengirl: Spartacus Outlaw: Never liked it much.

That's cool, and I can understand not wanting to participate in a holiday you didn't grow up with. However, I can't undersatnd hating a holiday so much you harass little children for wanting to play dress-ups.


I can field this one. It's not that the oldies in quesion were harassing kids for playing dress-ups. It's that older Australians regard the United Kingdom as "the old country" and see American culture as having a severely negative impact on us. If the kids were just dressing up for Halloween even that would probably have been fine, it's the associated trick-or-treating which is seen as uncouth by many Australians.

I'm 37 and when I was a kid no one did this. These days, we probably get two or three knocks on the door at Halloween and even then we've usually forgotten to stock up on treats most years.
 
2012-10-02 03:43:17 AM
Northern Hemisphere problems.
 
2012-10-02 03:58:47 AM

Aussie_As: Ravengirl: Spartacus Outlaw: Never liked it much.

That's cool, and I can understand not wanting to participate in a holiday you didn't grow up with. However, I can't undersatnd hating a holiday so much you harass little children for wanting to play dress-ups.

I can field this one. It's not that the oldies in quesion were harassing kids for playing dress-ups. It's that older Australians regard the United Kingdom as "the old country" and see American culture as having a severely negative impact on us. If the kids were just dressing up for Halloween even that would probably have been fine, it's the associated trick-or-treating which is seen as uncouth by many Australians.

I'm 37 and when I was a kid no one did this. These days, we probably get two or three knocks on the door at Halloween and even then we've usually forgotten to stock up on treats most years.


There's also the pumpkins and bobbing for apples thing, which isn't really spring-like. Weird how all of the wintery symbols of Christmas are celebrated down here, in the middle of summer, but Halloween feels wrong.
 
2012-10-02 04:15:30 AM
I prefer Autumn. I was gonna post some of my favorite Autumn pics but they're NSFW.
 
2012-10-02 04:27:33 AM
It's Winter Lite.
 
2012-10-02 05:15:26 AM

Aussie_As: older Australians regard the United Kingdom as "the old country"


And I would totally buy into that if it weren't for the fact that Halloween is celebreated in the UK.
 
2012-10-02 05:22:05 AM

Ravengirl: Aussie_As: older Australians regard the United Kingdom as "the old country"

And I would totally buy into that if it weren't for the fact that Halloween is celebreated in the UK.


I wouldn't say it was celebrated here, it's in much the same way it is in Australia I'm afraid. It's not embraced like it is in the USA, and a large portion of the population likes to tut and bemoan the fact that it's an American holiday.
 
2012-10-02 06:13:25 AM

Aussie_As: Ravengirl: Spartacus Outlaw: Never liked it much.

That's cool, and I can understand not wanting to participate in a holiday you didn't grow up with. However, I can't undersatnd hating a holiday so much you harass little children for wanting to play dress-ups.

I can field this one. It's not that the oldies in quesion were harassing kids for playing dress-ups. It's that older Australians regard the United Kingdom as "the old country" and see American culture as having a severely negative impact on us. If the kids were just dressing up for Halloween even that would probably have been fine, it's the associated trick-or-treating which is seen as uncouth by many Australians.

I'm 37 and when I was a kid no one did this. These days, we probably get two or three knocks on the door at Halloween and even then we've usually forgotten to stock up on treats most years.


When the US celebrates ANZAC Day I'll celebrate Halloween and consider it a legitimate holiday. In the meantime it's a day businesses try to make money.
 
2012-10-02 06:35:37 AM

Slaxl: Ravengirl: Aussie_As: older Australians regard the United Kingdom as "the old country"

And I would totally buy into that if it weren't for the fact that Halloween is celebreated in the UK.

I wouldn't say it was celebrated here, it's in much the same way it is in Australia I'm afraid. It's not embraced like it is in the USA, and a large portion of the population likes to tut and bemoan the fact that it's an American holiday.


I figured this. I've watched about as much UK tv as US tv and never seen much made of Halloween.

The problem with Australia is we don't do much at Guy Fawkes either. That always seemed cooler to me as a kid growing up than Halloween. None of the "Australian" holidays (eg Anzac Day, Australia Day) seem to offer much special to kids (especially sugar addicts or pyromanics).
 
2012-10-02 09:51:40 AM
autumn, fall, & the Harvest - the season so nice they named it thrice
 
2012-10-02 10:35:23 AM

Pocket Ninja: 3) The sentence you are using contains one or more of the following words: "whom," "irregardless," "apropos," "whilst," or "saturnine."


One of these things is not like the others.
 
2012-10-02 11:50:00 AM
Everyone knows that the five seasons are actually called Sweet, Boom, Pungent, Prickle, and Orange.
 
2012-10-02 11:56:15 AM

Jedekai: English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European Romance/Italic and Germanic languages do not get along.


The Germanic languages and the Romance languages are all Indo-European. IIRC, Basque (Euskara) is the only living non-Indo-European language in Europe.
 
2012-10-02 03:13:30 PM

FloydA: Jedekai: English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European Romance/Italic and Germanic languages do not get along.


The Germanic languages and the Romance languages are all Indo-European. IIRC, Basque (Euskara) is the only living non-Indo-European language in Europe.


You forgot Finnish
 
2012-10-02 04:21:35 PM
files.abovetopsecret.com
 
2012-10-02 05:27:21 PM

cman: FloydA: Jedekai: English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European Romance/Italic and Germanic languages do not get along.


The Germanic languages and the Romance languages are all Indo-European. IIRC, Basque (Euskara) is the only living non-Indo-European language in Europe.

You forgot Finnish


Is it? I was under the impression that the Indo-Uralic relationship was pretty widely accepted. I don't know, this is outside of my field; I haven't really looked into it in more than a decade, and then only superficially. I really thought Basque was the only surviving non-IE isolate. Can you recommend any good references? Thanks.
 
2012-10-02 05:33:06 PM

FloydA: cman: FloydA: Jedekai: English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European Romance/Italic and Germanic languages do not get along.


The Germanic languages and the Romance languages are all Indo-European. IIRC, Basque (Euskara) is the only living non-Indo-European language in Europe.

You forgot Finnish

Is it? I was under the impression that the Indo-Uralic relationship was pretty widely accepted. I don't know, this is outside of my field; I haven't really looked into it in more than a decade, and then only superficially. I really thought Basque was the only surviving non-IE isolate. Can you recommend any good references? Thanks.


Finnic languages are not related to Indo-European. The two biggies are Estonian and Finnish. I got this all from Wikipedia.
 
2012-10-02 07:40:02 PM

cman: FloydA: cman: FloydA: Jedekai: English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European Romance/Italic and Germanic languages do not get along.


The Germanic languages and the Romance languages are all Indo-European. IIRC, Basque (Euskara) is the only living non-Indo-European language in Europe.

You forgot Finnish

Is it? I was under the impression that the Indo-Uralic relationship was pretty widely accepted. I don't know, this is outside of my field; I haven't really looked into it in more than a decade, and then only superficially. I really thought Basque was the only surviving non-IE isolate. Can you recommend any good references? Thanks.

Finnic languages are not related to Indo-European. The two biggies are Estonian and Finnish. I got this all from Wikipedia.


Interesting. I had been under the impression that within the "Nostratic" superfamily, the Uralic languages were closer to PIE than Altaic. I knew that "Nostratic" was considered a controversial grouping, but I didn't realize it had been abandoned.

Granted, I only know about any of this stuff indirectly, through archaeologists' attempts to translate 1960s era Russian linguists, for our own purposes, but I thought Nostratic was at least a viable hypothesis among linguists.

Ya learn something new every day.
 
2012-10-02 07:46:41 PM

FloydA: cman: FloydA: cman: FloydA: Jedekai: English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European Romance/Italic and Germanic languages do not get along.


The Germanic languages and the Romance languages are all Indo-European. IIRC, Basque (Euskara) is the only living non-Indo-European language in Europe.

You forgot Finnish

Is it? I was under the impression that the Indo-Uralic relationship was pretty widely accepted. I don't know, this is outside of my field; I haven't really looked into it in more than a decade, and then only superficially. I really thought Basque was the only surviving non-IE isolate. Can you recommend any good references? Thanks.

Finnic languages are not related to Indo-European. The two biggies are Estonian and Finnish. I got this all from Wikipedia.

Interesting. I had been under the impression that within the "Nostratic" superfamily, the Uralic languages were closer to PIE than Altaic. I knew that "Nostratic" was considered a controversial grouping, but I didn't realize it had been abandoned.

Granted, I only know about any of this stuff indirectly, through archaeologists' attempts to translate 1960s era Russian linguists, for our own purposes, but I thought Nostratic was at least a viable hypothesis among linguists.

Ya learn something new every day.


All I know I have learned from Wikipedia and Encarta when it was still around. I wish I could go and have practical experience. Linguistics interest me moreso than other subjects. I have no idea why that is, why I am drawn towards it. Specifically speaking, my favorite study language is Old English. I can read about ~55% (without cheating using a translator, goes up to ~70% with a translator program) of the native language of the E edition of the Anglo-Saxon chronicles. The hardest part is the obsolete spelling, especially when it uses inflections.
 
2012-10-02 08:33:49 PM
cman:

Are you familiar with Kevin Stroud's History of English podcast? If not, you might enjoy it. It's interesting stuff.
 
2012-10-02 08:38:46 PM

FloydA: cman:

Are you familiar with Kevin Stroud's History of English podcast? If not, you might enjoy it. It's interesting stuff.


Thanks for the link. I gotta subscribe to it.
 
2012-10-02 08:44:57 PM
cman:

Cheers.

Now I really should get back to drinkworking. Ēadigne ǣfen giet.
 
2012-10-02 10:33:04 PM

cman: FloydA: cman: FloydA: Jedekai: English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European Romance/Italic and Germanic languages do not get along.


The Germanic languages and the Romance languages are all Indo-European. IIRC, Basque (Euskara) is the only living non-Indo-European language in Europe.

You forgot Finnish

Is it? I was under the impression that the Indo-Uralic relationship was pretty widely accepted. I don't know, this is outside of my field; I haven't really looked into it in more than a decade, and then only superficially. I really thought Basque was the only surviving non-IE isolate. Can you recommend any good references? Thanks.

Finnic languages are not related to Indo-European. The two biggies are Estonian and Finnish. I got this all from Wikipedia.


I thought there was a Hungarian/Finnish link.
 
2012-10-03 06:55:50 PM

lohphat: cman: FloydA: cman: FloydA: Jedekai: English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European Romance/Italic and Germanic languages do not get along.


The Germanic languages and the Romance languages are all Indo-European. IIRC, Basque (Euskara) is the only living non-Indo-European language in Europe.

You forgot Finnish

Is it? I was under the impression that the Indo-Uralic relationship was pretty widely accepted. I don't know, this is outside of my field; I haven't really looked into it in more than a decade, and then only superficially. I really thought Basque was the only surviving non-IE isolate. Can you recommend any good references? Thanks.

Finnic languages are not related to Indo-European. The two biggies are Estonian and Finnish. I got this all from Wikipedia.

I thought there was a Hungarian/Finnish link.


There is.

This is a quite interesting summary
 
2012-10-03 07:01:49 PM

FloydA: cman: FloydA: Jedekai: English is a language that is the result of why Indo-European Romance/Italic and Germanic languages do not get along.


The Germanic languages and the Romance languages are all Indo-European. IIRC, Basque (Euskara) is the only living non-Indo-European language in Europe.

You forgot Finnish

Is it? I was under the impression that the Indo-Uralic relationship was pretty widely accepted. I don't know, this is outside of my field; I haven't really looked into it in more than a decade, and then only superficially. I really thought Basque was the only surviving non-IE isolate. Can you recommend any good references? Thanks.


Basque is the only surviving isolate in Europe, but there are other non-Indo-European languages in Europe that are not isolates, as they are part of other families (Finnish, Hungarian, etc.).

More here
 
2012-10-03 07:21:05 PM
Equatus noxus
 
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