If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slate)   So is it 'fall' or is it 'autumn?' And why is it the only season with two names?   (slate.com) divider line 196
    More: Interesting, Samuel Johnson, English speakers  
•       •       •

12295 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Oct 2012 at 4:15 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



196 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-01 04:29:49 PM  

highendmighty: HighZoolander: /why measure length with letters?

Isn't there a tattooed penis joke out there somewhere.


WENDY
 
2012-10-01 04:29:50 PM  
Over here, fall is called rainy season. It then goes into winter which is known as the stormy season. It eventually transitions into spring which we call the "son of a biatch, is the rain ever going to stop!" season. Then comes summer when everything manages to dry out just in time for the rainy season to start up again.

/Circle of life and all that.
 
2012-10-01 04:30:39 PM  

skullkrusher: Isn't there a tattooed penis joke out there somewhere.


Yes, he's called Travis Barker.
 
2012-10-01 04:30:56 PM  
www.kinderart.com
 
2012-10-01 04:31:28 PM  
gray or grey?
 
2012-10-01 04:32:30 PM  

browntimmy: Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE

That's just ass backwards. When ordering in a restaurant do you say "I'll have a Diet Pepsi Coke"?


First off, get out of here with your "diet" crap. Second, obviously not. You also don't say "I'll have a Pepsi soda" or "I'll have a Pepsi pop". You just order a Pepsi. The issue isn't what you call a specific item or brand, it's what you use as the generic catch-all. If you ask for a Kleenex, you're not going to flip your shiat if someone gives you another brand.
 
2012-10-01 04:33:17 PM  
i consider this time late summer. once hurricane season is officially over, then it's fall... fall last until lent, which marks the beginning of spring. spring lasts until hurricane season starts (also known as "summer", which lasts about 8 months).
 
2012-10-01 04:33:57 PM  
Summer has two names: Summer and ZOMGHOT
Winter has two names: Winter and ZOMGICE
Spring has two names: Spring and +++ATH+++ CARRIER LOST.
 
2012-10-01 04:34:17 PM  
And why is it the only season with two names?

spring = sperm-term

subby = horrid failure

; ]
 
2012-10-01 04:34:18 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?


Being Mormon I feel compelled to answer ths one actually. semi annual is twice a year and bi annual is every two years.
 
2012-10-01 04:34:44 PM  

highendmighty: HighZoolander: /why measure length with letters?

Isn't there a tattooed penis joke out there somewhere.


I should point out that words with lots of syllables are more of a mouthful
 
2012-10-01 04:35:40 PM  
Fall.

Go Saxon or go home.
 
2012-10-01 04:36:16 PM  
I'm lying in bed in my frumpy, flannel pants listening to the rain.
So I'm getting a cozy kick....
 
2012-10-01 04:37:06 PM  
The whole "pants" thing meaning underwear in Britain is an example of how dumb they are about what was once their language.

"Pants" comes from "underpants". As in under PANTS. or if you prefer UNDER PANTS. They're warn under your pants.

Don't even get me started on rubbers.
 
2012-10-01 04:37:24 PM  

Cythraul: Blame the British and their fancy English.


We used to say Fall in Britain too until about 100-150 years ago when it was updated to Autumn. Language changes like that over time.

We will not give up say dual carriageway though!

Autumn is more common as a girl's name in the US apparently.
 
2012-10-01 04:38:27 PM  
In the 12th and 13th centuries, spring was called lent or lenten

It's still "lente" in Dutch.
Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).
 
2012-10-01 04:39:57 PM  

skullkrusher: highendmighty: HighZoolander: /why measure length with letters?

Isn't there a tattooed penis joke out there somewhere.

WENDY


That's the one. Thank you :)
 
2012-10-01 04:40:45 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: Fall.

Go Saxon or go home.


Considering how farked up the English language is, we really cannot be sure if "Fall" came from Saxon. England was colonized by many western Germanic peoples (Angles, Saxons, Jutes, Frisians, Franks, and more). Then the Viking settlements brought in Northern Germanic people, further infusing our tongue with their lexicon. When the Norman conquest happened, those who spoke the educated English were decimated leading the language to only the language of the simple folk. English itself is a end result of language merger and cultural conquest.
 
2012-10-01 04:43:21 PM  

reillan: Summer has two names: Summer and ZOMGHOT
Winter has two names: Winter and ZOMGICE
Spring has two names: Spring and +++ATH+++ CARRIER LOST.


Cable-Fiber Networking Seasons
Summer: Shiat is stretching due to the heat. Adjust levels.
Winter: Shiat is contracting & breaking due to cold. Truck roll to fix.
Spring: Dammit they stole the fiber line because they thought it was copper. Truck roll to replace.
Fall: Dammit they shot at the doves, missed, and broke the line. Truck roll to fix and 4 hours to find the damn thing.
 
2012-10-01 04:45:00 PM  

Badgers: Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).


Huh. I don't suppose you know the etymology of "festival"? If the origin of "harvest" is "herbest/hervest" (herfest?), might be 'fest'ival comes from the same root, meaning something like "harvest celebration".
 
2012-10-01 04:45:19 PM  
I thought Summer was also called 'Dammitshot'
 
2012-10-01 04:45:57 PM  

Last Man on Earth: Badgers: Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).

Huh. I don't suppose you know the etymology of "festival"? If the origin of "harvest" is "herbest/hervest" (herfest?), might be 'fest'ival comes from the same root, meaning something like "harvest celebration".


Sorry, Festival is pure Latin
 
2012-10-01 04:46:48 PM  
blimey i want to go to britain and eat a pot noodle in the midst of autumn
 
2012-10-01 04:46:51 PM  

cman: Last Man on Earth: Badgers: Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).

Huh. I don't suppose you know the etymology of "festival"? If the origin of "harvest" is "herbest/hervest" (herfest?), might be 'fest'ival comes from the same root, meaning something like "harvest celebration".

Sorry, Festival is pure Latin


...and has no connections to harvest. It is related to Feast, however
 
2012-10-01 04:51:54 PM  
Fall refers to the pagan or prehistoric observation that the sun was falling into the underworld. Autumn is the name of the really hot red head girl that you roll in the leaves with while wearing tight warm sweaters.
 
2012-10-01 04:52:02 PM  
White lady problems
 
2012-10-01 04:52:34 PM  
It's whatever you want to call it. I've never met anyone from the U.S. or Britain that doesn't understand both terms.

/I say Autumn, but sometimes I say Fall.
 
2012-10-01 04:53:35 PM  
It's becauase "Have a nice trip this Autumn" just sounds stupid.
 
2012-10-01 04:53:46 PM  

Last Man on Earth: browntimmy: Tell Me How My Blog Tastes: GreenAdder: It's pop.

It's coke. Coke when it's cold, coke when it's kinda cold, coke when it's hot, or "Phi-slamma-jamma-time" as we call it in DC, and coke when it's kinda hot. COKE

That's just ass backwards. When ordering in a restaurant do you say "I'll have a Diet Pepsi Coke"?

First off, get out of here with your "diet" crap. Second, obviously not. You also don't say "I'll have a Pepsi soda" or "I'll have a Pepsi pop". You just order a Pepsi. The issue isn't what you call a specific item or brand, it's what you use as the generic catch-all. If you ask for a Kleenex, you're not going to flip your shiat if someone gives you another brand.


Is club soda called club coke? Is root beer a coke? Orange soda?
 
2012-10-01 04:56:06 PM  
A few responses above that autumnal (x) > fall (x). Where I grew up, people just say winter (x), and summer (x), but for spring it's almost always vernal (x) and for fall autumnal (x).

But then we also say soft drink... soda = club soda, and pop, depending on context is either an ice pop or lollipop.

/first time I visited TX I ordered a Coke, and the waitress asked what kind I wanted: Coke, orange Coke, or Dr. Pepper.
 
2012-10-01 04:56:25 PM  
Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall are all Anglo-Saxon or Germanic in Origin.
Autumn came to us via the French and Latin. English almost always has at least two words for everything, not to mention two pronunciations and spellings. Think of all the word pairs you can such as gal (or gel) and girl, gormless and gummy, etc.--the language is full of words that came from two different sources. From Norman and Parisian French we get duplicates such as "guardian" and "warden", "warantee" and "guarantee", etc. (the hard sound is Norman, the soft is French).

English vocabulary is replete with words of latinate or anglo-saxon-germanic origin (including replete), although it has four times as many words of French-Norman origin than anglo-saxon. The Anglo Saxon words tend to be very basic vocabulary that changes little over time. French and latinized vocabulary never displaced words like "moon", "day", "house", "cow", etc.

Winter is not very clearly related to hiver (French), but hivernis (Latin) does look a little closer because Latin is closer to Indo-European, the common ancestor of German and Latin and almost all European languages except Basque and maybe Roma.

Summer is clearly not derived from été (French) nor is it clearly derived from Latin. It is Germanic.

But why are three of these words Anglo-Saxon and only one Franco-Latinate? Who knows? The main reason is that the rear guard action against the new masters was able to hold out three quarters of the way on seasons, a fairly decent defence or defense.

Our days of the week are also mixed but Anglo-Saxon put up a better fight: Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday are all Anglo-Saxon-Germanic. Saturday alone is named after a classical god, Saturn. But in French, lundi, mardi, mercredi, jeudi, vendredi, and samdi and dimanche (dominicus, the Lord's Day) are all latinate. The origin tongues of France, like much of the population, were all but wiped out by the Romans.

Back in England, Fall went out of fashion because of the Franco-Norman upper classes, who said "automne" or "Autumn" and then because of middle class snobbery which used rules about which words you could use to attack their "betters" and their "inferiors" as they rose to power. Summer survived virtually unchanged, winter and spring were in between. Fall may have lost some ground due to harvest, in fact. You could pretty avoid talking about the season at all.

The ancestors of many Americans and Canadians came from places like Yorkshire which were conservative and economically backward even in the 1600s and 1700s, and thus produced a large number of economic refugees or "settlers", "planters" and "colonials" as they are called when they are not "immigrants" or "illegals", which is to say, johnney-come-latelies with browner skin.

Fall is still used in England but mostly in the North or less formal speech. The more Frenchified and Normanized South uses Autumn. This is subject to change without notice, and of course, there's always somebody trying to put on airs or else conceal their posh backgrounds in a form of reverse snobbery.

Many of the things that the British deplore about American English are not peculiar to American English but are mere slightly old-fashioned or regional. Given the number of Yorkshire ancestors I have found while investigating my deep and widespread colonial American roots, I would say that us North Americans come by our linguistic quirks and customs honestly enough. From the look of things, both sides of the Atlantic Mutual Misunderstanding Society are roughly evenly matched, with both sides more inventive in slang and novelty than they would care to admit in polite society.

The conservative classes like to think that they are conservative in language as well as traditions and politics, but there's little evidence to back them up. Their traditions are often surprisingly recent innovations, their language thoroughly riddled with modern slang and phase shifts of various kinds, and their politics not very conservative of anything except the interests of the few who play politics to win.
 
2012-10-01 04:57:05 PM  

Pocket Ninja: You may appropriately use "autumn" in the following circumstances:

1) You speak with a British accent.
2) You are writing a poem in which the change of season is being compared to the stages of life.
3) The sentence you are using contains one or more of the following words: "whom," "irregardless," "apropos," "whilst," or "saturnine."
4) You are attending some sort of equestrian event that involves floppy hats.
5) You are holding some sort of cup with an extended pinkie finger.

In almost every other instance, "fall" is the correct term.


frikkin beat me to it with his high falutin' verbage.
 
2012-10-01 04:57:34 PM  
Spring forward, Fall behind.... Has to do with time
 
2012-10-01 04:57:44 PM  

Tired_of_the_BS: A few responses above that autumnal (x) > fall (x). Where I grew up, people just say winter (x), and summer (x), but for spring it's almost always vernal (x) and for fall autumnal (x).

But then we also say soft drink... soda = club soda, and pop, depending on context is either an ice pop or lollipop.

/first time I visited TX I ordered a Coke, and the waitress asked what kind I wanted: Coke, orange Coke, or Dr. Pepper.


they make ORANGE coke? blimey

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-01 04:58:43 PM  

nursedude: In my part of Canada we have:
Winter and Roadwork...there also used to be a season called hockey but I think global warning killed it.


We call them "Road Removal" and "Snow Construction" in Minnesota, but the theory is the same.
 
2012-10-01 04:59:24 PM  
It's called snowbird season, subby.
 
2012-10-01 05:00:22 PM  
If you live anywhere near or north of 45 it is patently obvious. There are more than four seasons.

In order : Winter, Mud, Spring, Blackflies, 4th of July, Autumn, Fall, Stick, Winter.....

Winter = obvious
Mud = not quite spring but starting to thaw, frost heaves, ice jams on rivers
Spring = when the first green grass starts to appear
Blackflies= warm enough to go out but you can't because of the blood sucking bugs
4th of July = Maybe warm enough to take off the sweater.
Autumn = golden rod in full bloom, ragweed pollen high, tall grass in fields turns yellow
Fall = Leaves are falling off trees
Stick = no leaves on trees but not cold enough for snow
 
2012-10-01 05:00:52 PM  

God Is My Co-Pirate: Mangoose: cretinbob: ArcadianRefugee: Are they pants or trousers? Is it bi-annual or semi-annual?

bi-annual is every two years. Semi-annual is every 6 months

You mean twice a year for biannual, no?

Yes. Every two years is biennial.


www.tvparty.com
That's tree times a yeaaah
 
2012-10-01 05:04:00 PM  
half of fall all of winter and half of spring if SEASON in florida
 
2012-10-01 05:04:20 PM  
My dog calls them (in decreasing order of preference):

White (Winter)
Pounce (Fall)
Wet (Spring)
Hot (Summer)
 
2012-10-01 05:05:34 PM  
My year has only 2 seasons:

Hotandshiattytime and Ahhhhhhhhh......
 
2012-10-01 05:06:56 PM  
Three names subby, or did you forget Octoberfest?
 
2012-10-01 05:09:07 PM  
Move to Seattle. We don't have seasons, just a period of more wet and a period of less wet.

/actually it's quite pleasant but it's obligatory
 
2012-10-01 05:10:36 PM  
Anyone with a good education knows that it's Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity, Summer is for the long vacation.

/peasants
 
2012-10-01 05:10:44 PM  

We shall give Spring an additional name:

Boiyoiyoiyoingg!!

images.wikia.com
 
2012-10-01 05:10:52 PM  

Last Man on Earth: Badgers: Autumn is "herfst" (from old German/middle Dutch "harbista/herbest/hervest", which became "harvest" in English).

Huh. I don't suppose you know the etymology of "festival"? If the origin of "harvest" is "herbest/hervest" (herfest?), might be 'fest'ival comes from the same root, meaning something like "harvest celebration".


Wikipedia is magic.
 
2012-10-01 05:11:11 PM  

Nightsweat: The whole "pants" thing meaning underwear in Britain is an example of how dumb they are about what was once their language.

"Pants" comes from "underpants". As in under PANTS. or if you prefer UNDER PANTS. They're warn under your pants.

Don't even get me started on rubbers.


"Pants" in the American sense comes from the French, "pantaloons", which were the type of loose trousers worn by the Turks (parachute pants are merely an exagerated sub-type). Underpants is clearly related but not the source. American English was briefly under the spell of French thanks to the French assistance (which was decisive at several points in time, including the Surrender of Cornwallis) during the Revolution.

Early politics was split between francophiles and francophobes, or conversely, anglophiles and anglophobes. Of course, we now know that they are the same thing, namely a francophobe is a francophile who has met a Frenchman, and an anglophobe is an anglophile who has met the English.

The old British word "trousers" is derived from "trewes", which were more like the American cowboy's "chaps" in that they were not originally joined up, but were leggings of coarse cloath or leather to protect the horseman's legs from brush and other threats.

Like "scissors", trousers are plural because there used to be two of them. ("Scissors" are still called "ciseaux" in French, which also means chisels. Two chisels, bound together at the fulcrum, become scissors.)

British usage often sneaks into commercialese in North America because of snob appeal. Thus habidashery often has an antique and posh air about it, with a sort of stilted language of its own. You are more likely to hear "trousers" in a posh tailor's shop or boutique than J.C. Penney.

Other examples of historically determined differences between the British and Americans include the pronunciation of certain words, such as "Duke".

The British pronounce it with a nearly French vowel, while the Americans use the briefly popular Regency pronunciation which the Beaux of the time of Prince George, later King George IV, used. DOOK is also the pronunciation in the North of England. It's our Yorkshire forbears again. If you want to do a Yorkshire accent, ham it up a bit. Some Americans and Canadians have a good head start on the English when regional accents are in play.

Others shouldn't even try to fake a British accent, howsoever humble or out-of-the-way. Language is in constant flux and you've moved on too far to look back.

Conversely, the British are totally clueless when they do American accents because they don't realize there is more than one despite having about 66 regional dialects of their own, and several layers of each.
 
2012-10-01 05:12:47 PM  
mfw Englishmen call Autumn "Coldy-Mopey Leaf fall offy"
 
2012-10-01 05:14:01 PM  
Interesting

i48.tinypic.com
 
2012-10-01 05:16:00 PM  
I'd prefer to abolish Fall and Autumn and just go with what's really important: Football Season or Oktoberfest.
 
Displayed 50 of 196 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report