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(NZ Week)   Some Chinese parents are upping the ante on giving your kid a weird name by using characters nobody can read   (nzweek.com) divider line 68
    More: Silly, Chinese, Chinese characters, social relations, Hubei, Chinese parents  
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8043 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Oct 2012 at 10:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-01 12:13:43 PM

The more you eat the more you fart: I'm gonna name my next kid "&@#%^*@!" and tell everyone it's pronounced "Bob".

/Sameiqua. Actual name i saw on the sign-in sheet this morning.


Is that short for Kate?

HailRobonia: ScottRiqui: Along the same lines, why is the name of "Tsing Tao" beer spelled that way when it's pronounced "Ching Dow"? Why translate it from Chinese into English words that look nothing like how they're pronounced?

Save a damn step and just print "Ching Dow" on the farking bottles, why don't you?

Because there are many different ways to transliterate Chinese words into English. The modern one, used by the PRC, would write it "qingdao". The other major system, Wade-Giles, would write "ch'ing tao".

But really the most common system is "ad hoc/whatever the person writing the label thinks" which leads to all sorts of craziness. Add on to this the fact that depending on where in China the product is from, it could be Cantonese, Mandarin, Hokkien, Shanghainese, etc. which have entirely different pronunciations.


"Ching Dow" is Cantonese, "Tsing Tao" is Mandarin.

I flew to Beijing from Hong Kong and my boarding pass had the right spelling of my name, CHI (Cantonese spelling, same on my passport), on it.

Got into China with no problems at all but getting back out was a huge pain in the backside.

Some moran had spelt it ZHI (Mandarin spelling) on my boarding pass and the airline basically said that my name didn't match the ticket and wouldn't let me through.

They even had the cheek to tell me that It was 'misspelt' on my passport. Farking shiathole country full of pretentious wankers.
 
2012-10-01 12:17:39 PM
Keep it simple like me. I have 4 kids. Two boys and two girls. They are all named Doug.
 
2012-10-01 12:25:13 PM
Personally, I blame the PRC for dumbing down their language with the so-called "simplified" characters. Any character older than the Revolution and even slightly complex is unreadable. It's the Chinese Communist Party's version of Newspeak.
/Calligrapher.
 
2012-10-01 12:32:51 PM

weapon13: But really the most common system is "ad hoc/whatever the person writing the label thinks" which leads to all sorts of craziness. Add on to this the fact that depending on where in China the product is from, it could be Cantonese, Mandarin, Hokkien, Shanghainese, etc. which have entirely different pronunciations.

"Ching Dow" is Cantonese, "Tsing Tao" is Mandarin.



Tsing Tao brewery ran a print ad campaign in the 80s basically telling people "Yeah, we know how it looks, but it's pronounced 'ching dow' - just go with it".

I know there are several "proper" ways to transliterate the Chinese symbols, but would it have been *wrong* for them to have put "Ching Dow" on the label? Because to me, it seems like that's the one they should have used if it was one of the acceptable choices.
 
2012-10-01 12:38:42 PM
What? They're not throwing pots and pans down the stairs anymore to come up with names?

/I kid, I kid.
//but seriously
 
2012-10-01 12:41:30 PM

cgraves67: Meh. Prince's parents beat them to it.


I just called him "Squiggles".
 
2012-10-01 12:53:09 PM
chinese food

www.weirdasianews.com
 
2012-10-01 12:59:16 PM
Hillbillies are way ahead of the Chinese in giving their children names that nobody can read.

Or write. Or spell. Or pronounce. Or remember.

Jon, this means you! At least when Jon is a way of spelling John and not short for Jonathan as it often is among Jews (Jon Stewart, I presume, is one of these).

Names that nobody can remember might have an evolutionary advantage in the criminal classes, though, seeing as it would go a long ways to covering up a crime, a criminal record or the movements of the perp in question.

A good name can cover a multitude of crimes. So can a forgetable voice or face.
 
2012-10-01 01:08:51 PM

brantgoose: A good name can cover a multitude of crimes. So can a forgetable voice or face.


Odysseus would agree with you, at least when it comes to blinding cyclopses.
 
2012-10-01 01:14:11 PM
Went on a date with a girl and things were going pretty well until she saw some trinket at a tourist shop and said "I always thought 'Nevaeh' is a pretty name."
 
2012-10-01 03:58:56 PM
Just to keep everything as simple as possible, I'll claim 神 for myself.

/name for firstborn girl is always easy: 一子
 
2012-10-01 08:23:44 PM
I gave my son a Chinese name, my daughter got one in Persian.
This article is oddly racist (Chinese are very racist, this one is opposite to their normal racism and reposted in my birth country)

A name is an identity, that is the PURPOSE of a name
Anybody who says otherwise probably has one of THOSE name (and will be forgotten in the crowd of other similarly subservient farkwits)
 
2012-10-01 08:35:30 PM
Can't wait for someone to translate Johnjacobjingleheimerschmidt into a single character.
 
2012-10-01 09:23:04 PM

puckrock2000: JackieRabbit: I have a friend who teaches Latin, Greek and classics, who tells a tale that I called BS on, but which he says is the truth. He says in one of his Latin 101 classes, he was calling the roll on the first day ot the semester and stopped when he got to a certain name. It was a Black girl and he asked her how to pronounce her name. She replied "Shee-thaid". The name was spelled "shiathead."

Let me guess; he also HAD "o-RON-ja-lo" (Orangejello), "la-MON-ja-lo", (Lemonjello), and "fa-MAH-lay" (Female) in his classes.

/and your friend's name is Ronly Bonly Jones.
//your friend screwed up the punchline; the name is supposed to be pronounced "shi-THEED"


Always heard it as "sha-THEY-id." And yes, my mother really did have one in an inner city public school system.
 
2012-10-01 10:05:49 PM
A coworkers wife was an elementary school teacher in Chicago. She had a student in class who's name was Na-a. When the mom dropped her off the first day of school, the mom told her 'It's pronounced 'Nuh-dash-uh'. The dash ain't silent.

I spoke to a woman who's name was Clo. Ticked her off when I called her 'clow' (rhymes with blow). Shesnapped at me 'it's pronounced 'see-ell-oh'.
 
2012-10-01 11:17:04 PM

FriarReb98: puckrock2000: JackieRabbit: I have a friend who teaches Latin, Greek and classics, who tells a tale that I called BS on, but which he says is the truth. He says in one of his Latin 101 classes, he was calling the roll on the first day ot the semester and stopped when he got to a certain name. It was a Black girl and he asked her how to pronounce her name. She replied "Shee-thaid". The name was spelled "shiathead."

Let me guess; he also HAD "o-RON-ja-lo" (Orangejello), "la-MON-ja-lo", (Lemonjello), and "fa-MAH-lay" (Female) in his classes.

/and your friend's name is Ronly Bonly Jones.
//your friend screwed up the punchline; the name is supposed to be pronounced "shi-THEED"

Always heard it as "sha-THEY-id." And yes, my mother really did have one in an inner city public school system.


Sure. I used to sign up for my frequent shopper cards with "Heywood Jablowme" as the name. When the clerk had to thank me by name at the end of every purchase, I'd get the knowing smirk with some, and others would pause and then ask 'How do you pronounce it?', to which I'd say "Jah blow MAY" and remark "It's Cajun".
 
2012-10-02 01:17:34 AM

The One True TheDavid: On a black Baptist church's sign I saw the pastor's name rendered as D'Artagnan. At forst I thought it was "one of those names" till I looked it up (link).


Not sure if mocking you for not knowing who D'Artagnan is would be some sort of snobbery. Surely everyone's seen at least one version of The Three Musketeers?

Lord Dimwit: In Japan, there's the concept of "rubi", which are small phonetic characters written around a person's name to indicate how it's pronounced, for names written with characters that are either rare or have multiple readings.

Honestly, when you start having to write your name twice, once phonetically, why not just...write your name phonetically?


I know it's a hard concept for people who use phonetic alphabets (which are simple, but ugly and meaningless - and yet people still can't spell!) to appreciate but characters actually have meanings that are important.

Awesome, your name is "Akihiro". Which "aki" and which "hiro"?

AKI: 明 (bright) 彰 (clear) 昭 (bright) 章 (poem, composition) 晃 (clear) 秋 (autumn) 晶 (crystal)

HIRO: 浩 (vigorous) 弘 (vast) 博 (esteem) 広 (broad) 宏 (wide) 洋 (ocean)

The way to chav up a name in Japan is to use Japanese characters but to register it with an English pronounciation; the equivalent of walking around literally saying yeah it's spelt "Yeshua", but it's pronounced "Son of God".

It's rare that any actual Japanese person won't know how to pronounce a name. The rubi are there for the few exceptions. In the end it's no different in English - how do you pronounce "Cassandra", soft or hard "a"? People never get "Dayna" correct, according to my friend. My name is spelt incorrectly around 25% of the time and it's really simple and spelt. how. it's. said.
 
2012-10-02 01:38:31 PM

Wamphyr: Can't wait for someone to translate Johnjacobjingleheimerschmidt into a single character.

 

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
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