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(Huffington Post)   Kanye West sued for sampling by someone who just now realized how the entire hip-hop music industry operates   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 5
    More: Stupid, Kanye West, Yauch, MTV Europe Music Awards, human beings, Nietzsche, Beasties, Best Female Video, VMA  
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2995 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 01 Oct 2012 at 10:05 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-01 09:34:16 AM
2 votes:
You know, I don't have a television - up to now, I always thought this guy's name was pronounced "Can-eye" believe it or not. That's just from seeing the word and assuming that's how it's pronounced.. Only realized yesterday when I heard someone say "Can-yea" that it was different.

/pointless story bro
2012-10-01 01:31:49 PM
1 votes:
There's nothing wrong with sampling IF what you're doing is truly sampling.

Sampling is when you take a few seconds of a song, and mix it with other samples (and preferably some of your OWN music, too) to create a "music collage" of various sounds and snippets that forms a wholly new piece of music.

What Kanye does (along with Timbaland and many others) is not sampling. It's plagiarism. They take whole songs, or several measures of a song, and then make a very minor modification to it or just sing over it. They don't make a wholly new piece of music; They make an older piece of music with new lyrics, or a different drum beat, or an additional instrument. They take far too much of the original, and they contribute far too little of their own creativity into the process.

Good use of samples: Information Society, Art of Noise, Daft Punk (sometimes).

Bullshiat use of "sampling": Timbaland, Kanye West, Vanilla Ice, Daft Punk (sometimes).

The final measurement in my mind, when I make music using samples is, "Can I recognize this as MY song, or as someone else's song with my little additions to it?" -- If it's more theirs than mine, then I've used too much sampling and I cut it down, remix, tweak, and change it so that each little sample blends into a whole that doesn't resemble any one other original piece of music.

If you play your song and it is immediately identified by more than a few people as someone else's song before your vocal/drum/changes kick in, then you're not sampling. You're stealing.

Or, the simple rule of thumb: If you sample more than 6 seconds of any music, you're probably plagiarizing, not sampling.

Hip hop is so forgiving about plagiarism. I don't get the mentality that some fans have that allows them to listen to something, then hear the almost-unchanged original from 20 years earlier, and say "Oh, well, Timbaland was just sampling. It's cool." Why apologize for people who demonstrate such a lack of talent or respect for music?
2012-10-01 11:17:00 AM
1 votes:
Well, when none of them know how to play an instrument, i guess you have to steal your music.
2012-10-01 10:41:54 AM
1 votes:
FTA: TufAmerica claims West's label Roc-A-Fella paid a license fee of $62,500, but "failed and refused to enter into written license agreements that accounted for their multiple other uses of ['Hook and Sling']." The label is seeking undisclosed damages for copyright infringement.

Apparently they also used the sampling in two videos. Sounds like Roc-A-Fella thought the license fee covered all uses for the album and videos and TufAmerica is being a dick about it. Not like they just sampled without paying at all.
2012-10-01 09:09:21 AM
1 votes:
Black people problems.
 
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