If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Migraine.com)   Twelve things NOT to say to a someone with chronic migraines. No mention of Drew's favorite: "How about a beer?"   (migraine.com) divider line 185
    More: Obvious, preventive medicines, medical sign, Social Security Disability, serotonin, migraines, systemic disease, chronic, increased heart rate  
•       •       •

6156 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Sep 2012 at 4:23 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



185 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-01 08:12:19 AM
I've noticed that once I fall asleep with a migraine I may sleep 6 to 12 hours. The weird part to me is that when I wake up I feel awesome. And it's not just that the migraine is gone. The world seems more vivid: colors are brighter but there's more to it than that. It's like all my senses are heightened. My whole body feels great and I'm on some sort of emotional high that usually lasts a day or two. It's a very productive time for me.

Anybody else have similar experiences?
 
2012-10-01 08:24:39 AM
Yes, it feels like resurrection. Unreal. I've felt the same when suddenly recovering from the flu. I think sometimes you feel so horrible for so long you forget what a healthy body feels like, and when health floods back the experience is amazing.
 
2012-10-01 08:26:06 AM
I had my first migraine at age 14 (now 34). Spent many years trying to identify a trigger but still no luck. Visual aura leads with severe pain to follow if I try and "push on" and ignore it.

A codeine pill and 10 minutes with my eyes shut, if caught within 1-2 minutes of the visual onset, is enough to suppress it. Ignore it and it'll render me useless for the rest of the day.

Finally found an accurate visual representation of the aura.
 
2012-10-01 08:40:25 AM

Psylence: RivenSilver: The best thing you can say to them is "Here's some LSD."

Yea... that and mushrooms. Despite the fact that both are easily available I just cannot bring myself to try it out when I have a migraine. The thought of being trapped in a psychedelic migraine hell is just too much.. I already pray for death when I have a migraine.


Psilocybin is useful more for prevention than treatment, and has been studied mostly in cluster headaches.

I suffer from mild migraines which totally mess up my vision for about 20 minutes then develop into a thankfully mild headache that lasts a few hours. Untreated, this would occur a few times a week and was more in the "annoyance" category... e.g., I'd need to find a place to pull over when driving when they started, as I'd be pretty much blind for a little while. In my 20's (50+ now) I did have a few more classical migraines with the "clutch head and roll on floor in dark room; please shoot me" sort and I'm very thankful that what I've had since are so mild.

I've not needed taken my sumatriptan in 11 months since taking a few fairly intense "voyages"

/yes, it's just another anectdote
//plural of "anectdote" is "data"
 
2012-10-01 08:41:04 AM
Wow, buncha whiners in this thread.
 
2012-10-01 08:42:08 AM
Oops, meant to add that the reports I've read suggest that psilocybin is prophylactic for 6 to 12 months... so I might need to find some fungi soon.
 
2012-10-01 08:45:37 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


This is BS. I have migraines and am not into coke/coffee/tea in any big way (Occasional cuppa tea some days). So clearly you haven't met a large class of people who have migraines.

Caffeine can help migraines by constricting blood flow in the brain, this can sometimes be useful. If you look at Excedrin's ingredients it has caffeine in it for this reason. It doesn't work for all, and is something to discuss with a doctor.

(Excedrin and Excedrin Migraine are chemically identical, b.t.w.).

/Hate Migraines
//have ocular effects with mine
///they are kind of pretty if it didn't hurt so much
 
2012-10-01 08:53:02 AM

CokeBear: Mine are brought on by lack of caffeine, which is why I think they usually occur on the weekends.

During the week, my routine includes 1 or 2 large coffees in the morning, but on the weekend if I'm being lazy, I don't make coffee or get up early so I find myself suffering from caffeine withdrawal by mid-morning and a migraine by mid-afternoon. Of course without the coffee I'm not thinking clearly enough to recognize what's going on until it's too late.


That is just caffeine withdrawal. Stop drinking caffeine and the problem will go away forever.

I had a friend who drank (I'm not kidding here) 3 pots of coffee a day. And did so 7 days a week for many years. Then one day he realized that he was addicted to coffee and quit cold turkey. Had a headache for 3 days while his body detoxed.
 
2012-10-01 09:21:57 AM
I'm a little late to this party, but as someone with a close family member who suffers frequent and debilitating migraines, I'd like to give a hearty fark you to the insurance companies for the hoops they make you jump through to get hold of triptans. There aren't any generics yet so the drug makers are still gouging people on them and the insurance companies, who are pulling in many thousands of dollars a year on my policy, are all pissy about having to pay a few hundred to cover them.

Do your farking jobs, assholes. This is exactly why I have insurance. Because shiat happens and you agreed to pay for it when it did.
 
2012-10-01 09:39:25 AM
I thought that Sumatriptan was a generic Imitrex?
 
2012-10-01 09:40:44 AM
Please, you sound like you have an entitlement.

You joined a risk pool and the administrator's task is to make sure that no one is taking advantage of the other risk pool members.

Because you probably live in a state where insurance is highly regulated these conditions were spelled out into great detail in the plan documents. Now that they are almost all electronic there is even greater detail. The regulators even make them published simple versions. Best of both worlds simple and detailed.

So, how do you want it? The insurance companies to give away all of the money of the risk pool so they run out fast, or make sure there is no fraud?

Or do you want them just to give you what you want and break everyone else's b*lls.
 
2012-10-01 09:52:07 AM
Late in the thread, but what the hell:

ZeroCorpse: So, migraine sufferers, how are we to tell the difference between you and the dolt who has come to use the word "migraine" to substitute for "bad headache" or "caffeine addiction headache"? We can't actually see how much you're suffering and compare it to the bullshiatters. We can't feel what you feel. We can't know if you're one of the dumbasses who takes Excedrin every six hours and then gets headaches when it wears off, or if you are a legit migraine sufferer.


As someone who started getting migraines at age 8 and is still getting them at age 41, I can offer a few anecdotal observations as to how to tell the difference:

- A fake migrainuer is looking for extra sympathy, and will often be quite vocal about 'how much it hurts' to elicit a response from others; a real migraineur is in too much pain to say much of anything. Usually, even one's own voice is too much sound to bear during an episode, so most prefer silence.

- A fake migraineur is usually looking for attention & will become increasingly agitated if no one fawns over him/her; a real migrainuer just wants to be left alone.

- A fake migraineur will only complain about lights/sounds if someone is listening to them, if they remember to complain about these things at all; a real migraineur just puts on sunglasses, turns the lights & tv/music off before going about their daily business.

- A fake migraineur will complain about their headache, but still come to work wearing strong perfume/cologne; a real migraineur opts for unscented beauty products, esp. during an episode.

- A fake migraineur will promptly announce, after returning from the restroom, that they got violently sick (again, looking for sympathy); a real migraineur will quietly excuse him/herself, then return quietly after the umpteenth time they've worshiped the porcelain gods.

- Real migraineurs usually look very pale, possibly greenish (due to the nausea); some will also squint or blink/rub their eyes a lot (for those dealing with the visual aura) - most fakers aren't that invested in their 'story' to go to that level of detail.

The tl;dr version: Fake migraineurs are looking for attention & so draw attention to themselves, while people with the real deal just want to crawl off like wounded animals & find a quiet place to die.
 
2012-10-01 10:14:37 AM

rickycal78: INTERTRON: Hack Patooey: I get maybe two a month now, down from two a week about ten years ago. Imetrix is the only thing that helps, but, like others, I feel like Ive been worked over with a bat. Put me in a dark room with a heat pack over my eyes, and Ill be fine eventually. I envision my migraine like grapes in a giant vat of clear liquid, and I scoop them out one at a time, feeling my migraine go away. Eventually Ill fall asleep and wake up hours later, mostly human again.

Blah

I find that heat works better than an ice pack, too. I tend to situate a recliner right beside the microwave. Then, I fold a damp washcloth in half, roll it up, and microwave for 30 seconds. Lay back in the recliner for those seconds. Then, I fetch the cloth, put it over my face, and breathe deeply and slowly until it cools off. Repeat.

As you can see, I don't have a heat pack.

Heat works for me as well. if you don't have a hot pack you can make yourself a rice sock. Get a clean sock, dump enough rice in it to fill up about half of the part of the sock where your foot would sit. Tie the top of the sock into a knot and throw in the microwave for 45 seconds to a minute. Works great for muscle aches too.


SWMBO made a half dozen of these, sewn together nicely, out of old towels and rice. Two minutes in the microwave gives me about 15 minutes of "My face is almost on fire" heat. I also will stand in the shower with 'as-hot-as-I-can-stand-it' water pounding on the top of my head. That works, too.
 
2012-10-01 10:16:08 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: whiz


Indeed. Immediately after the surgery, I had no more migraines. The surgery, ironically, was for an unrelated condition. Beforehand, I had two states of being: feelin' fine and my head's gonna explode.

When I got my first "normal" headache after the surgery, I remember telling my wife, "So this is what you putzes are complaining about? Look, I can walk and eat and move!"
 
2012-10-01 10:22:00 AM

Nogale: Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.

Right hand or left hand? Or doesn't it matter?


I've seen it in both hands at the same time before, although one is always bigger and more prominent. Otherwise, it can switch hands, or stay with just one for awhile... No real pattern that I can guess on.
 
2012-10-01 10:26:23 AM

StandsWithAFist: Late in the thread, but what the hell:

ZeroCorpse: So, migraine sufferers, how are we to tell the difference between you and the dolt who has come to use the word "migraine" to substitute for "bad headache" or "caffeine addiction headache"? We can't actually see how much you're suffering and compare it to the bullshiatters. We can't feel what you feel. We can't know if you're one of the dumbasses who takes Excedrin every six hours and then gets headaches when it wears off, or if you are a legit migraine sufferer.

As someone who started getting migraines at age 8 and is still getting them at age 41, I can offer a few anecdotal observations as to how to tell the difference...


Sweet! Now I know how to fake having a migraine properly! j/k
 
2012-10-01 10:31:05 AM

Shirley Ujest: Unoriginal_Username: pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.

Excedrin Migraine has caffeine as a pain reliever aid, so you are correct

/That stuff is awesome, though the ones I can get from Canada are even better.

Wait...wait...wait....why are the Canadian version better?


It contains a moderate dose of an opiate and is available on demand over the counter, whereas equivalent American drugs are available only by prescription.
 
zez
2012-10-01 10:42:23 AM

Uncle Tractor: Bathia_Mapes: They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?

That's how my real attacks start; a dot of flashing blue/yellow lines in the middle. The dot turns into a short, thick horizontal lines that slowly expands and curves (like half the circle on your pic) until it reaches the edges of my visual field and is gone. Then the rest of the symptoms appear (fingers pushing eyes out from inside head, nausea, that awful taste in my mouth, dizziness, the headaches. etc)


That's what happens to me too. I feel bad for the people who get migraines without the flashing because at least I know what's coming up in 20-30 minutes and can prepare.

also, this video is the best example I've found to explain what I'm seeing since words don't do it justice.
Link
 
2012-10-01 01:38:09 PM

zez: Uncle Tractor: Bathia_Mapes: They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?

That's how my real attacks start; a dot of flashing blue/yellow lines in the middle. The dot turns into a short, thick horizontal lines that slowly expands and curves (like half the circle on your pic) until it reaches the edges of my visual field and is gone. Then the rest of the symptoms appear (fingers pushing eyes out from inside head, nausea, that awful taste in my mouth, dizziness, the headaches. etc)

That's what happens to me too. I feel bad for the people who get migraines without the flashing because at least I know what's coming up in 20-30 minutes and can prepare.

also, this video is the best example I've found to explain what I'm seeing since words don't do it justice.
Link


That's a pretty good visualization. For me, the best way I can describe it is that the words just fall off the page when I'm reading. Dark splotches would appear. I remember reading one book as a migraine started to hit and realizing that I was having to tilt my head to the side to try to "fit" all of the words into my narrowed vision.
 
2012-10-01 02:01:28 PM

radiobiz: I've noticed that once I fall asleep with a migraine I may sleep 6 to 12 hours. The weird part to me is that when I wake up I feel awesome. And it's not just that the migraine is gone. The world seems more vivid: colors are brighter but there's more to it than that. It's like all my senses are heightened. My whole body feels great and I'm on some sort of emotional high that usually lasts a day or two. It's a very productive time for me.

Anybody else have similar experiences?


Nope, same thing. The world feels brighter, field of vision feels super-wide, everything has everything amplified past 11.

And OMG do i get hungry.
 
2012-10-01 02:53:09 PM
I have chronic migraines and get +/- 10 per month. What I really love are the jerks who say they get them too but amazingly 1 excedrin will knock it out and they look like superstars while I need my maxalt and a dark place to lie down for an hour or two and I'm still foggy for the rest of the day.

I am especially excited when the manager says to me, why can't you just take an excedrin like Sally does?
 
2012-10-01 04:10:06 PM
I had migraines during my early teen years and I remember begging my mother to just kill me the pain was so horrific. I learned to take a couple of Benadryls to knock myself for 12 hours when I started getting an aura. Thankfully I've not gotten one in over 20 years. I wouldn't wish that pain on ANYONE.
 
2012-10-01 05:13:48 PM

On-Off: source?

I use it for mild attacks. It don't make the pain go away, but it make the pain more bearable, I don't feel like banging my head against the wall or blowing it up with a gun and can instead relax and watch a dumb movie or sleep if possible.
For the worst attacks, it don't help, only opiates will. And sumatriptan, in both cases.


Avoid using narcs for chronic pain, it's a bad idea.

"Father of Modern Medicine" William Osler, describes mj as probably the most satisfactory treatment for migraine.

Osler W. (1913) The principles and practice of medicine 8th ed. (New York: Appleton) p1089


This guys's talking about it right here to, give what credence to the video, but its more or less in line with what I've read from more legitimate sources.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4B6fARJlqMg
 
2012-10-01 06:25:37 PM
Migraines run in my family. My mother blessed both I and my sister with them, and we all have the same triggers.

Barometric pressure is a big one. If the barometric pressure changes too quickly, I'll get a migraine, starting in the sinuses. I used to have to drive between Virginia and South Carolina, and coming down the mountain on I-77 was a guaranteed way to give me a migraine so bad I could barely walk. I learned I could lessen the effects by slamming an energy drink or coffee, anything with lots of caffeine, and taking Sudafed and Aspirin.
Another is rapid flashing lights or colors, or anything that involves intense eyestrain. Biggest offender is 3D movies, though any movie will do it if I sit too close.

I usually know they're coming when I get auras, or whatever the equivalent is... I see what I've dubbed "The Shadow People" just to sound creepy. They're just black spots and shapes that blink in and out of my peripheral vision. Then I'll notice my vision "ghosting" or "trailing", that is, images, especially lights, seem to smear across my vision like some kind of slow motion camera effect. If it progresses beyond that, I see "The Tunnel" which is a blind-spot in the center of my vision, and sometimes it looks like stuff is coming out of it, at me.
My words start to get garbled, and though my mind can think them, my mouth can't say them. General dizziness and nausea. Sometimes I get really laughy. There's pain, and I hate everything, but I can't stop laughing.

Scariest migraine I ever had, I was working at a Walgreens and in the middle of a customer transaction, it was as if my vision of the world were the reflection on a still pond, and then a drop of water disturbed the surface right in the center of my vision. I almost passed out, and the sudden onset of migraine symptoms made me barely able to finish the transaction. My boss was nice enough to let me sit in the backroom for a while, but I needed to go home after that...
 
2012-10-01 06:26:55 PM
I know I'm late to the party, but as of the beginning of the year, I was having 1-2 debilitating migraines a month. I moved from Boston down to Newport, RI at the beginning of the year, and I think my stress levels weren't as bad so I got maybe one a month. Then, in June, a friend brought a reiki practitioner to my house and he "worked" on me for like a half hour. I'm a skeptic however I honestly have not had one since. I haven't quit eating cheese, drinking wine/booze, sporadically drinking caffeinated drinks or really stopped doing anything--and they've stopped.

..I just hope I don't jinx myself by mentioning this lol
 
2012-10-01 07:31:32 PM
Don't say "Wow, you sure get sick a lot." I know I do. It's why I take daily meds, make sure to sleep regularly, and rarely drink more than a few beers. The rub is that if I didn't do all those things I couldn't work and function at all. These days thanks to 160mg propanalol (beta blocker) per day I often get auras without the pain, but it still means I can't drive a car or meet you for a beer somewhere.

zez: this video is the best example I've found to explain what I'm seeing since words don't do it justice.


Very close to mine, though mine always starts in the exact center of my field of vision and grows outward until I can't really focus on much of anything. Weird part is I never had any kind of headache until I was 35. For my first I ended up in the ER thinking I was having an aneurysm. Couldn't believe I'd live through it, let alone feel that way a few times each month for the rest of my life.

Farkers might enjoy this Link to an article written by Jeff Tweedy of Wilco. He does a better job explaining migraines than most and how they affect you over time.
 
2012-10-01 08:54:04 PM

born_yesterday:

Out of curiosity, are there particular foods that commonly cause migranes?


I don't know how common this is among migraine sufferers, but I have to be extremely careful about how much chocolate I consume in a given period, or I'll be knocked dead.

Nitrates and various preservatives (MSG etc) also hurt me a lot.
 
2012-10-01 10:03:54 PM
Vangor, and others with cluster headache, or supporting someone with cluster headache, there is a great FB support group. And it is absolutely stupid that this government will not even allow *study* into the one substance that seems to offer long term control for this. And that is not a party statement. Administrations of both parties have steadfastly refused to allow study in this field for decades.

Sorry migraineurs, but while migraine can be one of the worst pains a human can endure, CH is *the* worst. The pain mechanism bypasses all of the methods your body employs to reduce or eliminate pain due to trauma. It's a direct, unregulated stimulation of the trigeminal pain nerves; damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead. Try to imagine having a root canal without anesthetic. In all the teeth on one side of your head. At the same time. Starting in your eyeball. For two hours. Three times a night. Every night. Then go to work. For six weeks. Or three months. Or six months. Women with cluster headache will tell you that one is more painful that giving birth without anesthetic.

I almost hate whoring out CH on a migraine thread, but our condition is so poorly recognized that we need to leech on all the attention we can get in order to get recognition so that hopefully the better options for treatment won't be either illegal or ratcheted down under the control of expensive Big Pharma.

All I'd like to say is that if you ever end up on a jury for someone using an illegal treatment for CH, cut the guy a break. Give him not-guilty. Hang the jury. Do something for him. He's living with a torture you can't imagine.
 
2012-10-01 11:24:12 PM

Fark Me To Tears: Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.

If it's your wife or girlfriend, after you've ushered her into that dark quiet room, stay with her if she wants you to. Shut up. Be quiet. Be there for her. If she asks you to touch her, do it, and do it exactly as she instructs you to -- no more and no less.

I've gone through both a marriage and a dating relationship with women who occasionally got migraines. Doing what they ask of you -- whether it's to leave them alone or to stay with them -- is very important. If they've had these headaches over a long stretch of their lives, they know better than anyone else on the planet when the migraine is coming and what does and doesn't help. (Ask a long-term migraine sufferer about the various migraine medications -- She'll usually be a walking encyclopedia of knowledge on that subject.) If she tells you to get the hell out, then get the hell out, and don't be butthurt by it. If she asks you to stay, then stay if you can. By this point, she's already briefed you on the dos-and-don'ts. Follow the rules and help her by doing what she asks of you.


As wife to a male migraine sufferer, I agree that this goes for the opposite sex, too. Follow orders and don't talk more than necessary while doing so.
 
2012-10-01 11:51:30 PM

Kejlina: I used to get migraines when I was a kid; First I'd get weird visual effects; blind spots, flashing lights. Then crippling head pain, light hurts, sound hurts, even the pillow hurts. Finally, the puking.

Ugh. Wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.


Exactly same for me. My first migraine was when I was 13 or so. I had no idea what wa happening. My mother was in the hospital and I rode public transportation to visit her. On my way home, I was having visual problems and black spots. I got more and more queasy as I went. I got home, ran through the front door, barely made it to the bathroom and threw up. The vision issue almost IMMEDITALY ceased.

From then on, they were pretty frequent through puberty. Now I get them mostly from light flashes (camera flash, glint from chrome when driving, etc). I have learned to adapt and only get maybe 1-2 a year.

/rarely have actual pain
 
2012-10-02 03:26:56 AM

Bathia_Mapes:

Sounds like that might have been an ocular migraine. They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?

i1.allaboutvision.com
Kind of like the above. First time I had one of those it scared the crap out of me because I'd never heard of ocular migraines & had no idea what was happening.


It would be cool if someone could photoshop/animate that.

Either change the grayed areas to tv tuned to no channel or triangles of that sparkley rainbow foil stuff that screams 1970s.
 
2012-10-02 04:27:23 AM

Wild Eyed and Wicked: Usually I just get the "fireworks" that just sparkle on the outer edges of my vision.


I get occasional migraines, with light, sound and odor sensitivity, and sparkles: pinpoint flashes of light similar to what you see when someone is welding. I've had these outside of the migraine but, oddly, never associated them with a painless migraine before. Next time I need to talk with a Dr about the migraine, I'll make sure to mention them.
 
2012-10-02 05:15:21 AM

Mister Peejay: Nope, same thing. The world feels brighter, field of vision feels super-wide, everything has everything amplified past 11.


Not how it is with me. The day after a full migraine (rare after I started with the coffee) I generally feel wobbly, floaty ... disconnected. Can't focus on anything.

And OMG do i get hungry.

I get the munchies during the attacks, not after.
 
2012-10-02 05:17:03 AM

Gimli_Gloin: So, how do you want it? The insurance companies to give away all of the money of the risk pool so they run out fast, or make sure there is no fraud?


How about national healthcare like the rest of the world has? Health insurance is just a scam.
 
2012-10-03 01:26:35 AM
I tend to get more migraines in the Spring and Fall when my allergies give me the worst problems, red wine can kick them off too. When I get one they usually last three days and I am utterly useless when I'm in the seventh level of hell. I get the problems with sound/light/smell issues as well.

Although I've had them for a good twenty years or more I've never been put on any medication for them, I've gone to ER's and urgent care clinics for them a couple of times and they give me a shot that knocks me and the migraine out, this will, about 65% of the time stop it and I don't have to deal with a full three days. Self administered herbal remedy does help with the "Baby" and "Teenaged" ones but the "Adult" ones are unconquerable.

But really, "Migraineur"... Do we need a title that sounds like we're members of an elite club. If I don't pay my dues will they kick me out?

/Please?
//Not paying.
///I don't want to be a member!
 
Displayed 35 of 185 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report