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(Migraine.com)   Twelve things NOT to say to a someone with chronic migraines. No mention of Drew's favorite: "How about a beer?"   (migraine.com) divider line 185
    More: Obvious, preventive medicines, medical sign, Social Security Disability, serotonin, migraines, systemic disease, chronic, increased heart rate  
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6152 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Sep 2012 at 4:23 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-30 04:26:00 PM
Migraine's ok, how's yourgraine?
 
2012-09-30 04:27:52 PM
The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.
 
2012-09-30 04:29:32 PM
You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.
 
2012-09-30 04:33:50 PM
What about silently handing them a coke and then getting the fark away?
 
2012-09-30 04:41:40 PM

enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.


I get chronic migraines and the stupid questions stopped the day I puked on a co-worker.
 
2012-09-30 04:41:42 PM

Agarista: What about silently handing them a coke and then getting the fark away?


Possibly, if you like getting beaned with a coke can.
 
2012-09-30 04:42:42 PM
In other words, if someone says they have a migraine, walk away and do not interact with them. They will be an asshole if you do.
 
2012-09-30 04:45:03 PM
How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.
 
2012-09-30 04:45:55 PM
This disorder is crippling. I've seen professionals accuse people of being drug addicts over it. I've only had a couple and they were terrifying.
 
2012-09-30 04:46:00 PM
"Stop whining; you're not the first person to get a headache, and you won't be the last."
 
2012-09-30 04:48:30 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.
 
2012-09-30 04:49:31 PM
Ex: Man I'm having another shiatty migraine attack. We should have sex, it'll make me feel better or something.
Me: Ehh well I don't think so, usually sex just makes you feel worse and you can't even finish because of the pain.
Ex: Nah, nah! It'll work this time, promise.

Then the rest of the day complaining about how it feels 100 times worse. Farking retarded.
 
2012-09-30 04:50:25 PM
13) "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHH!!!!"
 
2012-09-30 04:52:37 PM

pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.


Like I said, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Darwin always wins.
//Drink up!
 
2012-09-30 05:06:31 PM

Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.


This comment is more intelligently-written than that entire article.

Chronic migraines definitely suck, and they're not all genetic. Mine are caused by a non-cancerous lesion in my brain that came from an injury. For the brain surgeons who care, it's in the left frontal lobe in front of and a little above Broca's area.

After a lot of treatment, I'm down to about one migraine a month (a few years ago, it was one a week).
 
2012-09-30 05:08:35 PM

NannyStatePark: This disorder is crippling. I've seen professionals accuse people of being drug addicts over it. I've only had a couple and they were terrifying.


Dr H. Intruder, PhD, says to stop drinking coffee.
 
2012-09-30 05:08:47 PM
I got my own mess of problems so I can feel where this author is coming from.... but... there's some grade a whining and exaggerating going on in that article. "NO ONE HAS IT WORSE THEN ME!" .
 
2012-09-30 05:09:19 PM

Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.


You... you understand, man!
 
2012-09-30 05:12:52 PM
I used to get migraines when I was a kid; First I'd get weird visual effects; blind spots, flashing lights. Then crippling head pain, light hurts, sound hurts, even the pillow hurts. Finally, the puking.

Ugh. Wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.
 
2012-09-30 05:22:30 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


Caffeine can help sometimes. If I feel like I'm starting to get one, I can sometimes get past it by having something with caffeine.

Unfortunately, there's so many foods that trigger migraines, just figuring out what to eat can be a pain in the ass some times.

Best thing to do for a migraine (short of good drugs) is a dark room, complete quiet, and an icepack behind your neck and/or over your eyes.
 
2012-09-30 05:26:06 PM

Tiberius Gracchus: "Stop whining; you're not the first person to get a headache, and you won't be the last."


This statement pisses me off the most when someone gives me crap for having a migraine. Lemme take this baseball bat and pound your head with it for the next 6 hours and see if you'll say that again. I'm just glad mine aren't as common as they were a few years ago. I get one a month now compared to the 2-3 a week I used to get, and as long as I don't get the one migraine that sent me to the ER again I can deal with this.
 
2012-09-30 05:29:58 PM

I Like Bread: 13) "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHH!!!!"


14) Want to go watch that Pokemon seizure episode?
 
2012-09-30 05:34:51 PM
The weirdest migraine I had occurred while I was teaching a writing class. I couldn't see things in the center of my field of vision (previous migraines had affected my peripheral vision). The brain does its best to compensate for things it can't see, but when I needed actual details from the blind spots (like, words on a page), my brain couldn't supply the answers. I called on students to read things off the overhead (since I could no longer read them), then I ended class slightly early. I hadn't experienced a migraine in about 5 years, but fortunately I recognized the bizarre symptoms. I consider myself lucky that migraines don't manifest with pain for me, but they're definitely debilitating.

/Migraines are weird and manifest differently for different people.
 
2012-09-30 05:42:28 PM

NeoCortex42: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

Caffeine can help sometimes. If I feel like I'm starting to get one, I can sometimes get past it by having something with caffeine.

Unfortunately, there's so many foods that trigger migraines, just figuring out what to eat can be a pain in the ass some times.

Best thing to do for a migraine (short of good drugs) is a dark room, complete quiet, and an icepack behind your neck and/or over your eyes.


Out of curiosity, are there particular foods that commonly cause migranes?
 
2012-09-30 05:47:45 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


Scratch that record. You just met me
 
2012-09-30 05:48:45 PM

pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.


You're right. Caffeine is one of the ingredients in some popular anti-migraine meds. For certain people/ types of migraines it can work wonders.
 
2012-09-30 05:50:13 PM

born_yesterday: NeoCortex42: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

Caffeine can help sometimes. If I feel like I'm starting to get one, I can sometimes get past it by having something with caffeine.

Unfortunately, there's so many foods that trigger migraines, just figuring out what to eat can be a pain in the ass some times.

Best thing to do for a migraine (short of good drugs) is a dark room, complete quiet, and an icepack behind your neck and/or over your eyes.

Out of curiosity, are there particular foods that commonly cause migranes?


For me, citrus is a big one. I can't eat oranges or drink orange juice at all. Also, some foods that use a lot of seasoning or preservatives (I'm not always sure what in it specifically causes it). For instance, Chicken in a Bicuit crackers almost always give me a migraine the following day. Sucks, cause I love those things.

It's mostly random stuff that I simply learn to avoid after a while. If you get migraines, it's a very good idea to keep track of what foods you eat and when you get migraines (use a diary if necessary). After a few times, it becomes obvious what foods affect you. It can vary wildly from person to person.

WebMD has a good breakdown of common stuff: Link. I almost forgot, some cheeses cause them, too.

Also, it can change over time. When I first started getting migraines in middle/high school, there weren't many foods that caused them, and I didn't get them very frequently. Over the past few years, I've had to pay much more attention to foods I eat as well as my environment.
 
2012-09-30 05:55:31 PM
have some delicious cheese and an MAOI
 
2012-09-30 05:58:00 PM

Forty-Two: I called on students to read things off the overhead (since I could no longer read them), then I ended class slightly early.


Another thing that contributed to this weird experience: I couldn't see students raising their hands. I asked for volunteers to read, and then I couldn't see who was volunteering. Again, the brain compensates; I was "seeing" a bunch of students seated at their desks, but I couldn't see details like raised hands.

The brain is fascinating. Such compensation is clearly key to our species's survival. Yet experiences like that lead to existential, epistomological questions--How much of what I've experienced is just the brain filling in the gaps? Have I had migraines that I haven't noticed just because I wasn't in a situation where I needed much detail?
 
2012-09-30 05:59:50 PM
DRTFA, but is there something in there similar to "Here, you HAVE to try this magic powder/gel/cream I buy from this guy in Timbuktu online! Seriously! I've NEVER BEEN SICK since I started using it! And it only costs $50 a month!"?

Because I farking hate those people.
 
2012-09-30 06:01:45 PM

Agarista: What about silently handing them a coke and then getting the fark away?


This. My ex got them a couple if times a week to the point where I would put her to bed with a Coke and just STFU for a couple of hours. She described it as having brain freeze for hours. I used to smuggle Imitrex and pherenol (sp?) from Mexico a few times a week by the pound just to keep her from blowing her brains out.
 
2012-09-30 06:05:55 PM
The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.
 
2012-09-30 06:06:38 PM
I got diagnosed with migraines a couple of years ago when I had a severe headache that didn't go away for FOUR WEEKS. Had the MRI and everything. Caffeine helped a lot, but (contrary to the article), the thing hat helped ME the most was: excersize. Started cycling every day, and now I'm down to one migraine a month or so (usually longer). Dropped 65 pounds, to boot.

Drugs (Maxalt) USED to work, but they don't do much any more. They briefly put me on some antidepressant variant, but I got tired of he side effects and stopped.

/not really a CSB
 
2012-09-30 06:18:12 PM
Caffeine works at first.

Soon, though, you have to take more and more of it to make the pain stop, and then you find yourself needing even more just to feel okay. A bit after that, you can't break even, and the amounts you'll take to try to cope will make your head spin and your stomach ache.

That's when you go off, cold turkey, and suffer four or five days of constant headaches and twelve hours of sleep per night.

I remind myself of this whenever I'm tempted to have something with caffeine in it.
 
kth
2012-09-30 06:22:43 PM
I've had them for 28 years, and heard all of that.

The worst is the "have you tried..." Yes, I've tried your random thing you just read about in reader's digest, if it worked, I'd not be writhing in pain right now.

and

"Yours must not be so bad if you're here at work" No, it's not that mine aren't that bad, it is that as an adult I sometimes have to suck it up and do things anyway.

Cheese eating surrender monkey: enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.

I get chronic migraines and the stupid questions stopped the day I puked on a co-worker.


I think I love you. I've fantasized about doing just that.
 
2012-09-30 06:36:07 PM
Rub some dirt on it, nancy.
 
2012-09-30 06:48:59 PM
When I was a kid my Grandpa would tell me about having headaches so severe that he would literally bang his head against a wall. I just thought my crazy old war veteran grandpa had lost his mind when he was involved in taking France in WWII. I was wrong. I got my first one at age 22. Yeah, migraines have driven me to actually strike my head against a wall. I'm not really a people person and I pretty much don't like anyone aside from my immediate family, my wife. and a few select close friends. I wouldn't wish that level of pain on anyone, for any reason. It is truly horrific, in ways that you non-sufferers could never imagine.
 
2012-09-30 06:49:54 PM

pute kisses like a man:
i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.


Caffeine does decrease migraine symptoms. That's why so many of us drink coffee. And why "migraine formula" pain relievers tend to have about 200mg caffeine.

A caffeine-withdrawal headache is NOT a migraine. I've never had caffeine withdrawal cause partial blindness, severe dizziness, numb face/limbs, or severe nausea.

Half of the migraines I get never even manifest a headache.

The only one I get on the list is #10, from other people that get them. On that tip. There was a FARKer who told me a year or so ago to try drinking a Red Bull at the onset of symptoms. Well, I'll tell you what: That stuff tastes horrible and is expensive as all get-out ($2.50 for a 7 ounce can???) but It's so worth choking down that vile juice because it works. 10 minutes into a migraine and I had my full range of vision back. Wish I could find that thread so I could sponsor some TF on his/her ass.

/it's all in my head? Of COURSE it's all in my head!! Now, give me back my drill, I need to let the demons out
 
2012-09-30 06:54:08 PM
The first one I had included partial white-out blindness and violent throwing up... I was 15 and home alone all day, thought I was dying. After that they were rare and just extreme headaches that were solved by immediately going to sleep for 6-10 hours no matter what else was going on in my life.

Went 10 years without having one until last year, manifested as tingling and numb extremities, inability to swallow, extreme dizziness, and pronounced feeling that if I didn't think about it, I'd stop breathing. Thought I was having a stroke, and so did the hospital... CT, MRI, and a few shots to the gut of anti-coagulant later (leaves motorcycle crash like bruises), they declared there was nothing wrong with me and threw some sumatriptan at me. Took 10 days before I felt normal again.

Sumatriptan makes me feel like I've been hit by a bus when I take it... sore all over, exhausted... now I just close my eyes to fight the spins and ride out the weird tingly feelings, better than the drugs. Been a few months since I've had another one (there were coming about every month and lasting for 7-10 days). Hoping that it was just a little phase my brain was working out (as the 2nd opinion neurologist thought it might be, though to be fair - he didn't think they were migraines, but he didn't know what it was either and my MRI was better than normal according to the radiologist).

/CSB
 
2012-09-30 06:54:22 PM

kertus: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

Scratch that record. You just met me


My mom and oldest aunt get them, and neither one drinks anything caffeinated.

I think I'm the only male in my family who gets 'em. Joy.

/i think only one of the girls doesn't
 
2012-09-30 07:04:51 PM
I've heard conflicting evidence on the value of caffeine. During one bout with migraines I stopped ingesting caffeine at all and things got really, really ugly. Caffeine is a vascular dilator, which can help in certain circumstances. However, a substantial change in caffeine intake can in some people (including me, apparently) serve as a trigger, whether the intake level goes up or down. Funny thing is that when I sense a migraine coming on I feel a little funny, and then if I touch my right temple and can feel an enlarged blood vessel I know I'm in for it, the pain train is on it's way. I swear it's a good thing I don't own a hand gun. That pain would have been enough for me to use it...
 
2012-09-30 07:05:02 PM
15) You should write a book of humorous cat stories.
 
2012-09-30 07:14:19 PM

Kejlina: I used to get migraines when I was a kid; First I'd get weird visual effects; blind spots, flashing lights. Then crippling head pain, light hurts, sound hurts, even the pillow hurts. Finally, the puking.

Ugh. Wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.


There's sometimes a "churning" sense element involved. My wife suffers from migraine. Most attacks are minor, about 2 times per month. Occasionally she gets a doozy and swears she smells and sometimes hears colors.

Yes, she is also schizophrenic, but her shrink says it is NOT related to the (now controlled w/ Resperidone) schizophrenia.
 
2012-09-30 07:16:50 PM

Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.


This!
 
2012-09-30 07:17:09 PM
One of the things I hate about my migraines is that I never have any idea how long they're going to last. I'll have one last seemingly forever, then it'll go away really quickly...it weirds my husband out to see me stretched out on the sofa trying not to puke for hours, then watching me get up all of a sudden and demand food.
 
2012-09-30 07:22:00 PM

kth: I"Yours must not be so bad if you're here at work" No, it's not that mine aren't that bad, it is that as an adult I sometimes have to suck it up and do things anyway.


I mainly get the visual type. It seems to me that the stress of trying to see through the blind spots is what causes the headache in the first place.

I've found that I can get a lot of work done with my eyes closed. If I take my glasses off, I can see shapes, but I can't see enough definition that my brain tries to process anything, too. Sometimes I can power through it, sometimes I have to stop working.

But, like you say, there's work that's got to get done. Sometimes you just have to suck it up and deal with it.
 
2012-09-30 07:29:02 PM
The best thing you can say to them is "Here's some LSD."
 
2012-09-30 07:35:12 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: NannyStatePark: This disorder is crippling. I've seen professionals accuse people of being drug addicts over it. I've only had a couple and they were terrifying.

Dr H. Intruder, PhD, says to stop drinking coffee.


I'll confess to drinking a pot of coffee plus sodas at the time. I had two toddlers and pets keeping me on my feet. Haven't had one in years though.
 
2012-09-30 07:35:28 PM
Okay, I just RTFA instead of just glancing at the bullet points.

No. Just... no. I don't want your sympathy, I don't want farking coddling. Don't ask what you can do for me, if I need something I'll ask. Tend to your own business. Just respect that there are going to be some days where I can't be at full capacity (not zero, I'm still going to try because things aren't going to do themselves), and I don't like it any more than you do.

Fortunately, I work with people who are tolerant like that.
 
2012-09-30 07:39:10 PM
I had chronic migraines when I was a child. They did the deal where they deprived me of sleep and stuck probes in my head to measure my brain waves and everything. Never did figure out what caused them, and they disappeared eventually. My theory is that my brain was crashing due to how hard I worked it. I was so much smarter than everyone else, and the brain can only function for so long at a high rate. It just took me years to adjust to it. Yeah, adjust to it. Totally didn't lose any brain power over time...
 
2012-09-30 07:40:25 PM
I hate it when people tell me they "get migraines too!" when they don't. "Oh, but just take a couple Advil and you'll be fine!" I could have smacked that lady but I was too busy trying not to vomit all over the drug store counter from the spinning.

Eating poorly and lack of sleep seem to trigger mine. IF I can get myself to bed when i feel one coming on they usually aren't too bad for whatever reason, just the sound and light sensitivity and mild diziness along with almost bearable pain. OTOH if I try to fight through them and stay awake it's a mother farker with spots in my vision, vomiting - the full works.

In my 20's I got them a lot but now it's usually only every couple months. I attribute that to less drinking and better eating and sleeping habits.

My mother has them worse. Chocolate is big trigger for her, as is alcohol.
 
2012-09-30 07:41:52 PM
How about STFU

The tone of this article sickens me, because it's the exact same tone I'd use when pretending to be overly serious about some dumb bullshiat on a lark. So either the writer is doing satire poorly, or they actually believe what they're writing and that's scary.
 
2012-09-30 07:45:43 PM
Don't speak gibberish to a migraine sufferer. Or at least to me while I'm having one. I tend to think in words that don't exists in those moments, so you might say something to me that makes sense.

/dehydration trigger, or that's my best guess at identifying it
 
2012-09-30 07:47:38 PM
My mom's side of the family has been getting migraines for generations now. At least 4 that I know of, including me. Mine usually involve an incredibly sore left side of the back of my neck, and incredible pain behind my left eye. But they can and do get a lot worse than that.
If I can catch it soon enough, a Fioricet or two will kill it.
if not, I need an Imitrex. But that also knocks me the hell out. If I need to take an imitrex for my migraine, I'm pretty much done for the day.
 
2012-09-30 07:55:35 PM
over the years, different places i worked there were some people who would suffer horrible migraines. my honest observation: happened to the worst people. people that were always nasty, back stabbers, adulterers, you name it. i had no sympathy. i'm not saying this about you or your loved one who suffers from this terrible thing. i'm just saying, in the workplace i saw a whole lot of people get them that almost seemed to deserve them. i don't mean to offend anyone with my life observation.
 
2012-09-30 07:57:10 PM
I don't get migraines, but I do get panic attacks, so I can sympathize with having horrible experiences and the outside world not getting what you're going through.
 
2012-09-30 08:00:20 PM

RivenSilver: The best thing you can say to them is "Here's some LSD."


Yea... that and mushrooms. Despite the fact that both are easily available I just cannot bring myself to try it out when I have a migraine. The thought of being trapped in a psychedelic migraine hell is just too much.. I already pray for death when I have a migraine.
 
2012-09-30 08:03:50 PM

KrispyKritter: over the years, different places i worked there were some people who would suffer horrible migraines. my honest observation: happened to the worst people. people that were always nasty, back stabbers, adulterers, you name it. i had no sympathy. i'm not saying this about you or your loved one who suffers from this terrible thing. i'm just saying, in the workplace i saw a whole lot of people get them that almost seemed to deserve them. i don't mean to offend anyone with my life observation.


If only that were the case! If a simple complete lifestyle change would be all it takes to make them go away, I'd be all for it.

Sadly, the best I can do is avoid certain lighting situations, like trying to read through a reflection.

/one of the most comforting things in the Universe is that people don't always get what they deserve
 
2012-09-30 08:05:00 PM

enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.


Except that people recognize asthma as an actual affliction, while they still think migraines are "just headaches", and since we've all had headaches and lived through them, they pretty much act like migraine sufferers are just making it all up at the worst, or at the least are massive drama queens...
 
2012-09-30 08:10:05 PM

Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.


THIS

If I can have access to a quiet, darkened room I can usually sleep off a migraine & feel recovered enough to function normally the next day.

I had a boss that didn't seem to understand how the bright overhead lights at work would make my migraine bad enough that I was pretty much guaranteed a visit to the ER for uncontrollable vomiting on top of a migraine that lasted for at least three day. Which of course meant I missed more work than if she had just allowed me to go home for the rest of the day.
 
2012-09-30 08:16:33 PM

Mikey1969:
Except that people recognize asthma as an actual affliction, while they still think migraines are "just headaches", and since we've all had headaches and lived through them, they pretty much act like migraine sufferers are just making it all up at the worst, or at the least are massive drama queens...


Which is why there's a push to stop calling them "migraine headaches".

I'd like to say that they're closer to siezures than headaches, because there's a whole lot of misfiring going on, but at the same time, I don't, because I want to keep my driver's license. I'm not willing to lose my career over semantics.
 
2012-09-30 08:18:56 PM

Forty-Two: The weirdest migraine I had occurred while I was teaching a writing class. I couldn't see things in the center of my field of vision (previous migraines had affected my peripheral vision). The brain does its best to compensate for things it can't see, but when I needed actual details from the blind spots (like, words on a page), my brain couldn't supply the answers. I called on students to read things off the overhead (since I could no longer read them), then I ended class slightly early. I hadn't experienced a migraine in about 5 years, but fortunately I recognized the bizarre symptoms. I consider myself lucky that migraines don't manifest with pain for me, but they're definitely debilitating.

/Migraines are weird and manifest differently for different people.


Sounds like that might have been an ocular migraine. They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?

i1.allaboutvision.com

Kind of like the above. First time I had one of those it scared the crap out of me because I'd never heard of ocular migraines & had no idea what was happening.
 
2012-09-30 08:20:08 PM

Mikey1969: enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.

Except that people recognize asthma as an actual affliction, while they still think migraines are "just headaches", and since we've all had headaches and lived through them, they pretty much act like migraine sufferers are just making it all up at the worst, or at the least are massive drama queens...


I'm glad that in my case, everyone important in my life has seen me get migraines to the point of vomiting and tremors. Now when I tell them, they believe me.
 
2012-09-30 08:23:20 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


Not me. A couple of years ago I was getting migraines because of out-of-control blood pressure caused by kidney failure. After a month of having a migraine every day, I couldn't stop vomiting and Mrs Clam took me to the ER. You get your own room really fast when your blood pressure is 245/138.

Once my blood pressure was under control, the headaches went away.
 
2012-09-30 08:24:21 PM

pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.


Migraines run in my family, so I can say a little about this. Caffeine helps migraines on a short-term basis, but as HotIgneous Intruder implied, caffeine also makes it worse. There is a strong boomerang effect with caffeine and migraines, and when I had them, I learned quickly that the one day of feeling ok was not worth the 3 or 4 days of feeling like shiat that I would get after caffeine intake. Eventually I got to a neurologist and got some good meds, and I've largely outgrown them since then. Still, I have BAD memories of the year or two I suffered through without telling anyone.
 
2012-09-30 08:24:22 PM
8. It's just a headache.

My mother suffers from chronic cluster headaches. As a result and until the start of this year, I've had to help care for her for over fifteen years. When people hear she has cluster headaches, there is sympathy, but people always want to mention having migraines and therefore having some experience with this. But I understand the need to relate and lack of knowledge about the condition. What I cannot stand is the apparent dismissiveness some folks have towards this. A migraine once a year is nothing, and when you come into work complaining of a migraine but mean a bad headache I want to hit you.

Migraine, especially chronic Migraine is one of the worst kinds of pain there is, and is often undertreated enough to cause disability to the patient.

One of, but the above has been considered the worst in the medical field. Not taking anything away from sufferers of chronic migraines which are disabling, just laying some perspective.
 
2012-09-30 08:27:23 PM

Mister Peejay: kertus: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

Scratch that record. You just met me

My mom and oldest aunt get them, and neither one drinks anything caffeinated.

I think I'm the only male in my family who gets 'em. Joy.

/i think only one of the girls doesn't


My son started getting migraines when he was 8-years old. The first time he had one I didn't realize it was a migraine until he started vomiting uncontrollably on top of the severe headache. I had been sadly misinformed years before in my youth that children do not get migraines, even though it was obvious as I got older that the childhood headaches were indeed migraines. Over time I've figured out what were at least some of the triggers for myself, my son, not so much. He's an adult now, but still gets them so randomly and rarely that it's difficult to figure out what triggers them.
 
2012-09-30 08:30:34 PM

Psylence: Mikey1969: enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.

Except that people recognize asthma as an actual affliction, while they still think migraines are "just headaches", and since we've all had headaches and lived through them, they pretty much act like migraine sufferers are just making it all up at the worst, or at the least are massive drama queens...

I'm glad that in my case, everyone important in my life has seen me get migraines to the point of vomiting and tremors. Now when I tell them, they believe me.


I had my first (that I can recall) in pre-school. By the time I got home I was puking up all my lunch. I was lucky in that my mother also suffered them all her life, and when I told her my head hurt, and she saw how wrecked I was, she believed me. She had to tell off more than one teacher who would say shiat like "Oh, it's all in her head..." and "She's too young to get migraines..."

She would let me sleep in her bedroom (darkest room/heaviest curtains), and concentrating on the ticking of her old-fashioned alarm clock helped. It was kind of hypnotic.
 
2012-09-30 08:33:05 PM

Bathia_Mapes: Forty-Two: The weirdest migraine I had occurred while I was teaching a writing class. I couldn't see things in the center of my field of vision (previous migraines had affected my peripheral vision). The brain does its best to compensate for things it can't see, but when I needed actual details from the blind spots (like, words on a page), my brain couldn't supply the answers. I called on students to read things off the overhead (since I could no longer read them), then I ended class slightly early. I hadn't experienced a migraine in about 5 years, but fortunately I recognized the bizarre symptoms. I consider myself lucky that migraines don't manifest with pain for me, but they're definitely debilitating.

/Migraines are weird and manifest differently for different people.

Sounds like that might have been an ocular migraine. They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?



Kind of like the above. First time I had one of those it scared the crap out of me because I'd never heard of ocular migraines & had no idea what was happening.


I have had that happen a few times before but I mostly get the blind spots like the one mentiined above - once had to get an employee read what his record said on my computer because I could not see the spot I was looking at. I could see things in my periphrial vision but would lose it when I tried to actually look at it. Usually I just get the "fireworks" that just sparkle on the outer edges of my vision.

I am lucky - hsve not had a migraine in about one year...I don't wish them on anyone.
 
2012-09-30 08:37:15 PM

Psylence: Mikey1969: enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.

Except that people recognize asthma as an actual affliction, while they still think migraines are "just headaches", and since we've all had headaches and lived through them, they pretty much act like migraine sufferers are just making it all up at the worst, or at the least are massive drama queens...

I'm glad that in my case, everyone important in my life has seen me get migraines to the point of vomiting and tremors. Now when I tell them, they believe me.


That's how an old roommate of mine discovered that she even had them. She had such bad vomiting one night she tore her stomach lining in some way and started throwing up blood. By the time the drama was over, she discovered that she suffered from migraines and had injectable Imitrex...
 
2012-09-30 08:39:14 PM
I used to have awful migraines (during which time I discovered that most migraine medication was intended to simply knock your ass out). Then I had sinus surgery, and I haven't had a migraine since.
 
2012-09-30 08:42:10 PM
Check out my new strobe light!

Does this vuvuzela sound out of tune to you?

Who wants another Red Bull enema?
 
2012-09-30 08:45:25 PM
I've never gotten a painful migraine, thank goodness, but I have gotten those "silent" migraines episodically, the ones that obscure one's vision with spots and patterns. In my case, it was associated with an untreated case of sleep apnea, and was also accompanied by hypertension (like 165/130 hypertension, resting).

/I know, IANAD, but I thought I'd toss that little data point out there because the ultimate diagnosis was a total surprise to me.
 
2012-09-30 08:46:26 PM
Had daily migraines for almost two years. My wife was convinced I was making it up for sympathy. I wanted to punch her.

FWIW, they completely disappeared after I received a six-day dosage of cortisone to cure an allergic reaction to another drug I was given (for something unrelated).
 
2012-09-30 08:54:38 PM

Cheese eating surrender monkey: enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.

I get chronic migraines and the stupid questions stopped the day I puked on a co-worker.


Best one I ever got was from a customer: "You shouldn't be working with food if you're sick!" I told her that migraine is not contagious. Though at that moment I wished it was.
 
2012-09-30 08:59:34 PM

Vangor: 8. It's just a headache.

My mother suffers from chronic cluster headaches. As a result and until the start of this year, I've had to help care for her for over fifteen years. When people hear she has cluster headaches, there is sympathy, but people always want to mention having migraines and therefore having some experience with this.


Er, wow.

I get migraines sometimes to the point of being in delirium for a couple days, and I count myself fortunate that I don't get cluster headaches.

They're supposed to be the worst pain that people can experience.

/but on the bright side, your mother's got to be one tough mammajamma
 
2012-09-30 09:01:36 PM

Wild Eyed and Wicked: Bathia_Mapes: Forty-Two: The weirdest migraine I had occurred while I was teaching a writing class. I couldn't see things in the center of my field of vision (previous migraines had affected my peripheral vision). The brain does its best to compensate for things it can't see, but when I needed actual details from the blind spots (like, words on a page), my brain couldn't supply the answers. I called on students to read things off the overhead (since I could no longer read them), then I ended class slightly early. I hadn't experienced a migraine in about 5 years, but fortunately I recognized the bizarre symptoms. I consider myself lucky that migraines don't manifest with pain for me, but they're definitely debilitating.

/Migraines are weird and manifest differently for different people.

Sounds like that might have been an ocular migraine. They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?



Kind of like the above. First time I had one of those it scared the crap out of me because I'd never heard of ocular migraines & had no idea what was happening.

I have had that happen a few times before but I mostly get the blind spots like the one mentiined above - once had to get an employee read what his record said on my computer because I could not see the spot I was looking at. I could see things in my periphrial vision but would lose it when I tried to actually look at it. Usually I just get the "fireworks" that just sparkle on the outer edges of my vision.

I am lucky - hsve not had a migraine in about one year...I don't wish them on anyone.


Most times I don't get an aura before a migraine hits, but when I do, I know it's going to be an especially bad one. I have noticed that mine have lessened since I went through menopause. Before that I'd get at least one per month, usually a week before my period began.
 
2012-09-30 09:01:47 PM
I was surprised to hear about migraine induced strokes. A good friend of mine (and frequent migraine sufferer) recently had a stroke. He is in his 30s and in great health, so it seemed to come out of left field. I wondered if the two (migraine and stroke) might be related, and it appears that is at least plausible.
 
2012-09-30 09:03:30 PM
I used to get migraines all the time when I was a kid, but they're less of an issue now. As an adult my big problem has been with cluster headaches ... which are worse in a lot of ways.
 
2012-09-30 09:05:24 PM

Forty-Two: The weirdest migraine I had occurred while I was teaching a writing class. I couldn't see things in the center of my field of vision (previous migraines had affected my peripheral vision). The brain does its best to compensate for things it can't see, but when I needed actual details from the blind spots (like, words on a page), my brain couldn't supply the answers. I called on students to read things off the overhead (since I could no longer read them), then I ended class slightly early. I hadn't experienced a migraine in about 5 years, but fortunately I recognized the bizarre symptoms. I consider myself lucky that migraines don't manifest with pain for me, but they're definitely debilitating.

/Migraines are weird and manifest differently for different people.


That's how I know my migraines are coming.

I'll be walking around and suddenly "hmm I can SEE the book, but the words are missing."

Or worse: "well it seems that your face has disappeared."


I have 15 minutes once I see the faceless people to get to a dark room. Even thinking about it makes me nauseous and frightened.
 
2012-09-30 09:11:26 PM
Fun times was riding home on the R5 from Philly and fighting a migraine.

Ran between the cars to puke my guts out. A dark quiet place the train is not.
 
2012-09-30 09:14:02 PM
I get maybe two a month now, down from two a week about ten years ago. Imetrix is the only thing that helps, but, like others, I feel like Ive been worked over with a bat. Put me in a dark room with a heat pack over my eyes, and Ill be fine eventually. I envision my migraine like grapes in a giant vat of clear liquid, and I scoop them out one at a time, feeling my migraine go away. Eventually Ill fall asleep and wake up hours later, mostly human again.

Blah
 
2012-09-30 09:20:16 PM

Jgok: Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.

This comment is more intelligently-written than that entire article.

Chronic migraines definitely suck, and they're not all genetic. Mine are caused by a non-cancerous lesion in my brain that came from an injury. For the brain surgeons who care, it's in the left frontal lobe in front of and a little above Broca's area.

After a lot of treatment, I'm down to about one migraine a month (a few years ago, it was one a week).


I thought mine were strictly genetic, but it turns out they're actually being caused by hypertention (essential) pressing on the trigeminal nerve. So it's true migraine in the sense that it's neurological (the trigeminal being the largest of the cranial nerve bundles), and it has all the classic symptoms -- prodrome, postrome, crushing headache, scintillating scatoma (I get the dancing toothy rainbow type, the only kind of rainbow I hate), nausea, disorentation, photophobia, sonophobia, severe cramps, stiff joints, hot and cold flashes, tunnel vision, and more, depending on the severity of the attack. I even went blind for a few minutes once, which was just as scary as it sounds. And yes, after years of that I did start to wonder if it was worth it to live with it, so I completely understand why some migraineurs kill themselves. (I even got a greenlight here once mentioning that.)

I got used to the idea, horrible as it was, that I'd suffer some degree from it every single day for the rest of my life, and that became my reality, until I had two attacks that landed me in the hospital. The second was accompanied by other symptms so severe, they weren't sure I was going to make it back out. But it turned out that proper maintenance my essentiali hypertension (most likely caused by a kink in one renal artery) completely controls my migraine. I went from "suffer through every damn day forever" to "can't remember the last headache I've had" in less than two weeks. It was a farking miracle, and changed my life. Possibly even saved it.
 
2012-09-30 09:21:40 PM
Also the twelve things not to say to someone who has ulcerative colitis/Crohn's.
 
2012-09-30 09:33:21 PM

born_yesterday: Out of curiosity, are there particular foods that commonly cause migranes?


Because it's a neurological disorder, it's different for everyone. If you do a search on this question, you'll find a few nominal answers, most of them old by this point. Hard cheeses and red wine are commonly offered. But the reality is that it's just different and unique for each migraineur, and we only find out by experience, and sometimes by experiment.
 
2012-09-30 09:36:01 PM

rabidpandabear: pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.

You're right. Caffeine is one of the ingredients in some popular anti-migraine meds. For certain people/ types of migraines it can work wonders.


It certainly helped me a lot. Though I have to say, it was specifically *coffee* that worked best, and I don't know why. It doesn't seem strange to me, since there's something like five thousand chemicals in coffee, but I found out from experience that coffee was much better than caffeine alone, and better than any other complex delivery system containing caffeine. And it wasn't the amount, because high-test caffeine didn't do as much, either. It was some combination of chemicals in coffee.
 
2012-09-30 09:41:21 PM

pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.


Excedrin Migraine has caffeine as a pain reliever aid, so you are correct

/That stuff is awesome, though the ones I can get from Canada are even better.
 
2012-09-30 09:48:30 PM

Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.


Again, it's different for everyone. And believe me when I tell you that every migraineur has tried everything they've ever heard of, even stupid-sounding things. The misery is so excruciating that I would have happily thrust a wet finger into a light socket, had I any notion that it might possibly help. The trick you describe did help me, a little, sometimes, for a bit; not enough to make any meaningful difference. What also 'helped' for me was deliberately inducing an ice cream headache: while normally painful, under migraine it provided a few blessed seconds of relief -- only a few, but the relief was like an orgasm.

This "99%" crap is just that, I'm sorry. I'm happy for those it helps, really. But it didn't help me, and if it really did help 99% of the time, we'd all know about it. Hell, someone would have gotten a Nobel for it by now. I'd whittle it for them myself. With my teeth.
 
2012-09-30 09:50:43 PM

Hack Patooey: I get maybe two a month now, down from two a week about ten years ago. Imetrix is the only thing that helps, but, like others, I feel like Ive been worked over with a bat. Put me in a dark room with a heat pack over my eyes, and Ill be fine eventually. I envision my migraine like grapes in a giant vat of clear liquid, and I scoop them out one at a time, feeling my migraine go away. Eventually Ill fall asleep and wake up hours later, mostly human again.

Blah


I find that heat works better than an ice pack, too. I tend to situate a recliner right beside the microwave. Then, I fold a damp washcloth in half, roll it up, and microwave for 30 seconds. Lay back in the recliner for those seconds. Then, I fetch the cloth, put it over my face, and breathe deeply and slowly until it cools off. Repeat.

As you can see, I don't have a heat pack.
 
2012-09-30 10:02:45 PM

INTERTRON: Hack Patooey: I get maybe two a month now, down from two a week about ten years ago. Imetrix is the only thing that helps, but, like others, I feel like Ive been worked over with a bat. Put me in a dark room with a heat pack over my eyes, and Ill be fine eventually. I envision my migraine like grapes in a giant vat of clear liquid, and I scoop them out one at a time, feeling my migraine go away. Eventually Ill fall asleep and wake up hours later, mostly human again.

Blah

I find that heat works better than an ice pack, too. I tend to situate a recliner right beside the microwave. Then, I fold a damp washcloth in half, roll it up, and microwave for 30 seconds. Lay back in the recliner for those seconds. Then, I fetch the cloth, put it over my face, and breathe deeply and slowly until it cools off. Repeat.

As you can see, I don't have a heat pack.


Heat works for me as well. if you don't have a hot pack you can make yourself a rice sock. Get a clean sock, dump enough rice in it to fill up about half of the part of the sock where your foot would sit. Tie the top of the sock into a knot and throw in the microwave for 45 seconds to a minute. Works great for muscle aches too.
 
2012-09-30 10:04:47 PM
I read about something new that can cure Migraine or Have you tried this? It worked for a friend of mine. While Migraineurs want to know that our loved ones are thinking about us and want to help us, the chance that you have stumbled upon a miraculous treatment or "cure" that our specialists - or we who have suffered terribly with this disease - have not, is miniscule beyond measure.


What bullshiat. If something actually worked for someone else, there's a chance it COULD work for you. Even if that chance is miniscule (and it's NOT "miniscule beyond measure") it could be worth a shot. You're free to ignore it.
 
2012-09-30 10:05:29 PM
Suffered from migraines all my life. Male. 56

Visual auras, blinding headaches. Sensitive to light and sound. Paralysis of one side of my body. Vomiting.

Triggers: red wine & scotch (Congeners), old cheese, nuts. Low blood sugar. Release of stress.

Only cure? Leave me the fark alone in a dark, quiet room. Cold compress.

I also suffer from kidney stones - of the two? I'll take the migraine, but not by much.
 
2012-09-30 10:06:19 PM

kazikian: Also the twelve things not to say to someone who has ulcerative colitis/Crohn's.


I have a gut feeling that you can't legitimately claim that it's all in their head.

/a gut... feeling.

/swing and a miss
 
2012-09-30 10:06:40 PM

Psylence: RivenSilver: The best thing you can say to them is "Here's some LSD."

Yea... that and mushrooms. Despite the fact that both are easily available I just cannot bring myself to try it out when I have a migraine. The thought of being trapped in a psychedelic migraine hell is just too much.. I already pray for death when I have a migraine.


Same here. Although I found that pot (psychoactive, but not psychedelic) seemed to help, so I had some kind bud that I kept around strictly for medicinal use. (Yes, really.) The catch was that it took a good deal more than it would normally take to get me high; I usually wouldn't actually get high, but a couple times, I did, and that wasn't a whole lot of fun in that condition, I have to say.
 
2012-09-30 10:14:06 PM

Mikey1969: enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.

Except that people recognize asthma as an actual affliction, while they still think migraines are "just headaches", and since we've all had headaches and lived through them, they pretty much act like migraine sufferers are just making it all up at the worst, or at the least are massive drama queens...


That's pretty much the size of it, yeah. People just assume that if it was a really serious malady, it would either manifest itself in obvious ways (lesions or something), or they would already know that, since people tend to assume that they already know everything that's important for them to. (Which is why it's so damn hard to educate people, because they're ignorant of their own ignorance, and they're mostly okay with that. -- "If lesbians were really suffering under our laws, someone would have told me that already!") Things like being gay and a migraineur can go a long way towards educating you about your own ignorance and others'.
 
2012-09-30 10:17:26 PM

Mister Peejay: Mikey1969:
Except that people recognize asthma as an actual affliction, while they still think migraines are "just headaches", and since we've all had headaches and lived through them, they pretty much act like migraine sufferers are just making it all up at the worst, or at the least are massive drama queens...

Which is why there's a push to stop calling them "migraine headaches".

I'd like to say that they're closer to siezures than headaches, because there's a whole lot of misfiring going on, but at the same time, I don't, because I want to keep my driver's license. I'm not willing to lose my career over semantics.


Yep. Some of the same drugs used for epilepsy are also used for migraine. I had a friend who has epilepsy, and she shared some of her drugs with me, and it helped a lot of the time. And I also came to recognise that both follow a neurological cascade process that I was mostly aware of. But yeah, I don't want to lose my driver's license of this. Though migraine can be severe enough to keep me off the road, very few migraineurs get onset so rapid that it would ever present a road hazard.
 
2012-09-30 10:18:31 PM

radiobiz: I hate it when people tell me they "get migraines too!" when they don't. "Oh, but just take a couple Advil and you'll be fine!" I could have smacked that lady but I was too busy trying not to vomit all over the drug store counter from the spinning.


Last time someone told me that while I was having a migraine, I just said fark it and let the puke fountain out of my mouth all over them. If there's one thing that gets the message across properly, it's puking.
 
2012-09-30 10:18:40 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: This "99%" crap is just that, I'm sorry. I'm happy for those it helps, really. But it didn't help me, and if it really did help 99% of the time, we'd all know about it. Hell, someone would have gotten a Nobel for it by now. I'd whittle it for them myself. With my teeth


Actually, many doctors DO know about it, I or my wife has mentioned it to different doctors, at different times before, and their response has been positive, reinforcing, and always affirming that it is a known pressure point that causes relief for migraines.

But that doesn't matter anyway, since you want to be a prick, no matter what. If you don't know about it, it obviously doesn't exist, you know the only "real" solutions, yadda, yadda, yadda. I know how it goes. That's cool though, I don't know you, so I don't give two farks what you think about migraine relief. Make sure that you don't lower yourself t having someone try it as a relief agent some day, wouldn't want it to turn out to work and make you look like a bitter fool.
 
2012-09-30 10:29:40 PM

Wild Eyed and Wicked: Bathia_Mapes: Forty-Two: The weirdest migraine I had occurred while I was teaching a writing class. I couldn't see things in the center of my field of vision (previous migraines had affected my peripheral vision). The brain does its best to compensate for things it can't see, but when I needed actual details from the blind spots (like, words on a page), my brain couldn't supply the answers. I called on students to read things off the overhead (since I could no longer read them), then I ended class slightly early. I hadn't experienced a migraine in about 5 years, but fortunately I recognized the bizarre symptoms. I consider myself lucky that migraines don't manifest with pain for me, but they're definitely debilitating.

/Migraines are weird and manifest differently for different people.

Sounds like that might have been an ocular migraine. They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?



Kind of like the above. First time I had one of those it scared the crap out of me because I'd never heard of ocular migraines & had no idea what was happening.

I have had that happen a few times before but I mostly get the blind spots like the one mentiined above - once had to get an employee read what his record said on my computer because I could not see the spot I was looking at. I could see things in my periphrial vision but would lose it when I tried to actually look at it. Usually I just get the "fireworks" that just sparkle on the outer edges of my vision.

I am lucky - hsve not had a migraine in about one year...I don't wish them on anyone.


Do the 'fireworks' look anything like this? If so, that's scatoma, a common visual aura symptom. Mine look more like this, though this is a poor representation. (I saw a better one once, but I'm not finding it now.) They're also usually nearer the centre of my vision, so while I'm not 'blind' there when it happens, I'm often unable to make out details of what I'm looking at, which makes it difficult or impossible to read.

Wait, I found the better ones, on this page. Mine are most often similar to the beach scene (third one down).
 
2012-09-30 10:31:40 PM
How can I be the first after almost 100 posts?!?!?!?!

i291.photobucket.com

WHERE HAS MY FARK GONE?!???!?!!
 
2012-09-30 10:32:58 PM

whizbangthedirtfarmer: I used to have awful migraines (during which time I discovered that most migraine medication was intended to simply knock your ass out). Then I had sinus surgery, and I haven't had a migraine since.


Yep, trigeminal insult migraine. I'm sure it's much more common than even most doctors think. I even suspect that the constant assault on our sinuses (one of the more telling and common aspects of the industrial disease that plagues much of the developed world) is likely an original source for a lot of young-adult-onset of migraine.
 
2012-09-30 10:35:01 PM

KerwoodDerby: I've never gotten a painful migraine, thank goodness, but I have gotten those "silent" migraines episodically, the ones that obscure one's vision with spots and patterns. In my case, it was associated with an untreated case of sleep apnea, and was also accompanied by hypertension (like 165/130 hypertension, resting).

/I know, IANAD, but I thought I'd toss that little data point out there because the ultimate diagnosis was a total surprise to me.


That was my diagnosis, too, more or less: trigeminal insult from essential hypertension. Once the HT was under control, so was the migraine.
 
2012-09-30 10:36:49 PM

Christian Bale: What bullshiat. If something actually worked for someone else, there's a chance it COULD work for you. Even if that chance is miniscule (and it's NOT "miniscule beyond measure") it could be worth a shot. You're free to ignore it.


I do not think the author was suggesting nothing would work for them as much as "migraineurs" do research and have tried lists of treatments, medications, diets, behaviors, etc.. When people give little remedies, those people often never had the condition. I know of no one else who has cluster headaches, but there are always folks trying to tell my mother what works for them with simple headaches. Otherwise, the people who did have the condition are actively sought out with support groups and such because this is where sufferers do some research on the list of remedies to try.
 
2012-09-30 10:37:55 PM

kyuzokai: I was surprised to hear about migraine induced strokes. A good friend of mine (and frequent migraine sufferer) recently had a stroke. He is in his 30s and in great health, so it seemed to come out of left field. I wondered if the two (migraine and stroke) might be related, and it appears that is at least plausible.


There's some thought (there was an article here about this last year, I think) that chronic migraine, after years of it, can cause permanent changes to brain structure and function, including damage that can lead to things like stroke. But some migraine attacks, thankfully rare, can do this already, so you don't necessariy need years of it to reach that point. Epilepsy can kill, too (directly, not merely incidentally), and they are related.
 
2012-09-30 10:38:59 PM

kazikian: Also the twelve things not to say to someone who has ulcerative colitis/Crohn's.


The only thing I ever say to people with such disorders is some version of, "Is there anything I can do?"
 
2012-09-30 10:44:01 PM

kertus: Triggers: red wine & scotch (Congeners), old cheese, nuts.


Jesus, what a life. If I couldn't eat a can of cashews with a slab of Tilsit and rinse it all down with 21 year old Glenfarclas, I'd get a migraine.
 
2012-09-30 10:44:16 PM

Christian Bale: I read about something new that can cure Migraine or Have you tried this? It worked for a friend of mine. While Migraineurs want to know that our loved ones are thinking about us and want to help us, the chance that you have stumbled upon a miraculous treatment or "cure" that our specialists - or we who have suffered terribly with this disease - have not, is miniscule beyond measure.


What bullshiat. If something actually worked for someone else, there's a chance it COULD work for you. Even if that chance is miniscule (and it's NOT "miniscule beyond measure") it could be worth a shot. You're free to ignore it.


The point isn't that it might not help us, but rather the assumption -- much more common than you might guess, though perhaps not -- that we haven't already heard of it. When you're a regular sufferer, migraine becomes your second job, a full-time hobby, and we all become very well-informed experts on it. There is, as TFA says, probably nothing you've ever heard of, or ever will, that we haven't, or won't very soon. It's not impossible, but it's pretty unlikely. It's like suggesing to a Firefly fan some other Nathan Fillion stuff they may not have heard of, because, you know, they might like that. Your point is entirely valid, but misplaced.
 
2012-09-30 10:46:39 PM
when one is coming on for me [i've only had mild ones i think] i see a green tint or aura outlining objects and a slight change in my hearing like there is more treble in sounds. i go to bed for 4-8 hours even if i start to feel better after an hour.
 
2012-09-30 10:47:29 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: kertus: Triggers: red wine & scotch (Congeners), old cheese, nuts.

Jesus, what a life. If I couldn't eat a can of cashews with a slab of Tilsit and rinse it all down with 21 year old Glenfarclas, I'd get a migraine.


I was at university when wine AND cheese parties were all the rage. Took me a while to put 2 and 2 together... Life was misery.
 
2012-09-30 10:48:27 PM

Mikey1969: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: This "99%" crap is just that, I'm sorry. I'm happy for those it helps, really. But it didn't help me, and if it really did help 99% of the time, we'd all know about it. Hell, someone would have gotten a Nobel for it by now. I'd whittle it for them myself. With my teeth

Actually, many doctors DO know about it, I or my wife has mentioned it to different doctors, at different times before, and their response has been positive, reinforcing, and always affirming that it is a known pressure point that causes relief for migraines.

But that doesn't matter anyway, since you want to be a prick, no matter what. If you don't know about it, it obviously doesn't exist, you know the only "real" solutions, yadda, yadda, yadda. I know how it goes. That's cool though, I don't know you, so I don't give two farks what you think about migraine relief. Make sure that you don't lower yourself t having someone try it as a relief agent some day, wouldn't want it to turn out to work and make you look like a bitter fool.


It sounds like you only skimmed my comment, and only actually took in the last para. That's unfortunate, because had you taken in the whole of it, you'd know that I already addressed everything you said. And I never said that doctors didn't know about it, or that anyone else didn't. In fact, I said the opposite: We've all heard of it, and we've all tried it, and yes, it helps some of us, to some degree, some of the time. But not 99%, and it doesn't "help 99% of the time." That part is indeed crap, and you've got nothing at all to base that figure on.
 
2012-09-30 11:13:27 PM
Here's the problem: It's hard for us to tell the difference between a person who has genuine migraines, and a person who THINKS they do because the Excedrin ads told them so. If I had a nickel for every time I heard someone describe their normal headache as "a migraine", I'd probably have a shiatload of nickels.

So, migraine sufferers, how are we to tell the difference between you and the dolt who has come to use the word "migraine" to substitute for "bad headache" or "caffeine addiction headache"? We can't actually see how much you're suffering and compare it to the bullshiatters. We can't feel what you feel. We can't know if you're one of the dumbasses who takes Excedrin every six hours and then gets headaches when it wears off, or if you are a legit migraine sufferer.

So really, how about instead of giving us a list of things not to say to you, you do like the rest of the people in the world with serious illnesses and disabilities and COPE WITH THE PROBLEM WITHOUT EXPECTING EVERYONE ELSE TO UNDERSTAND OR ACCEPT IT.

I have a variety of physical ailments and problems (GERD is not "just heartburn" by the way. It feels like a goddamn knife is being pushed through my heart when it kicks in. And chronic back pain may not "show" to everyone else, but I sure as hell feel it.) and I just push through my day and cope with it. My fiance has fibromyalgia, and she faces horrific days filled with pain and anguish-- The kind of pain that makes migraines look like Excedrin headaches-- and she doesn't make a big deal of people "understanding" her pain. She just tells them she's in pain, needs to go rest or cope with it, and leaves them to work out their own issues.

I sympathize with serious migraine sufferers. They should also sympathize with me (oh, yeah, I also have mild tinnitus, which SUCKS, even though it doesn't cause actual pain). But I don't get pissy when someone tells me to go take a pill for my back pain, or compares their back ache to my chronic pain caused by fused vertebrae, or acts like their heartburn is the same thing as when I miss a dose of my meds and my reflux hits me hard. I cope with it, deal with the problem, and let the rest of the world deal with their own problems.
 
2012-09-30 11:16:05 PM

enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.


This is basically what I was saying. Chronic sicknesses are misunderstood. Expecting people to research, learn, and sympathize with your particular problem is unrealistic. Deal with it. We all do.
 
2012-09-30 11:19:20 PM
I've only had a handful of migraines in my lifetime, but enough to sympathize. They usually start with "sprinkles" in my eyes, and the inability to focus on things. Then for a few hours, I feel like a Xenobite, having hooks driven into my skull plates and hung from them.
I'm a Helpful Henry most of the time, but when someone tells me they have a migraine, I turn off the lights and leave.
 
2012-09-30 11:22:25 PM

Unoriginal_Username: pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.

Excedrin Migraine has caffeine as a pain reliever aid, so you are correct

/That stuff is awesome, though the ones I can get from Canada are even better.


This.
The Excedrin works for me most of the time but my favourite are the "Canadian Tylenol" (Acetaminophen, caffeine, and codeine - OTC in Canada), the small amount of codeine really helps to take the edge off enough for me to function until bedtime when I can take something stronger (Sumatriptan, Frovatriptan, or Midrin) and knock myself out. Unfortunately, I'm running out of medication, don't have insurance, and I live in Texas so I can't get to Vancouver as often as I'd like. :p
 
2012-09-30 11:23:46 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: But not 99%, and it doesn't "help 99% of the time."


Well, the point is that YES it works 99% on my wife, which is what my original post stated, but whatever.
 
2012-10-01 12:16:18 AM

Mikey1969: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: But not 99%, and it doesn't "help 99% of the time."

Well, the point is that YES it works 99% on my wife, which is what my original post stated, but whatever.


What you actually wrote (since you've apparently forgotten):

"Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. YOU can almost always find a knot in this, but YOU actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If YOU pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , YOU will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone."

[emphasis mine]

Yeah, I can't imagine how anyone might figure you were talking about anyone but your wife there. Unless you're inviting everyone reading that to do that for her.
 
2012-10-01 12:17:49 AM

Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.


Does it matter which hand? Is one hand usually better for a person than the other--i.e., if they have success one time with one hand, do they keep using it (assuming a person has both hands)?
 
2012-10-01 12:29:12 AM
A friend of mine was prescribed pure oxygen. He would get migraines before tests and nearly rolled out of college. The little tank of O2 did the trick. True story.
 
2012-10-01 12:31:48 AM

farkplug: Does it matter which hand? Is one hand usually better for a person than the other--i.e., if they have success one time with one hand, do they keep using it (assuming a person has both hands)?


The meditative therapy that I have been taught involves tensing and flexing several muscle groups in my body. The core principle is that migraine attacks are often directly connected to blood flow problems that are unique to the sufferer. Mikey's wife seems to have a critical knot in her hands. I personally get minor relief from massaging my forehead and the back of my neck.
 
2012-10-01 12:32:18 AM

farkplug: Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.

Does it matter which hand? Is one hand usually better for a person than the other--i.e., if they have success one time with one hand, do they keep using it (assuming a person has both hands)?


It changes, not sure if either one is more often, but there have been times where my wife has one knot in each hand, but one will be a bigger knot than the other. It's like a little marble in there, and you can feel it go down until it's gone.
 
2012-10-01 12:59:57 AM

pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.


It does. I saw caffeine pills at the drugstore "for migraines".
 
2012-10-01 01:23:22 AM

Thanks for the Meme-ries: How can I be the first after almost 100 posts?!?!?!?!

[i291.photobucket.com image 100x80]

WHERE HAS MY FARK GONE?!???!?!!


That shiat was never cool and you should feel bad.
 
2012-10-01 01:29:33 AM

RivenSilver: The best thing you can say to them is "Here's some LSD."


Actually, my mom's current migraine med is a relative of LSD. Although the med's warnings say "don't mix with LSD" in a round about way.
 
2012-10-01 01:32:36 AM
I had a friend whose sister suffers from chronic migraines. Even if she takes something when she feels one coming on, the pain still knocks her out for a good day or so. It didn't matter what she ate or did that day, if one was going to happen, it would happen.

So of COURSE the first thing she does when it causes her to fail out of school is decide to take a chance at passing that along to a baby.
 
2012-10-01 01:54:10 AM

wyltoknow: Ex: Man I'm having another shiatty migraine attack. We should have sex, it'll make me feel better or something.
Me: Ehh well I don't think so, usually sex just makes you feel worse and you can't even finish because of the pain.
Ex: Nah, nah! It'll work this time, promise.

Then the rest of the day complaining about how it feels 100 times worse. Farking retarded.


Yes, you were.

RivenSilver: The best thing you can say to them is "Here's some LSD."


I was in the test group for cafergot. It did nothing for me.
/Except make me puke.
 
2012-10-01 02:14:00 AM

KrispyKritter: over the years, different places i worked there were some people who would suffer horrible migraines. my honest observation: happened to the worst people. people that were always nasty, back stabbers, adulterers, you name it. i had no sympathy. i'm not saying this about you or your loved one who suffers from this terrible thing. i'm just saying, in the workplace i saw a whole lot of people get them that almost seemed to deserve them. i don't mean to offend anyone with my life observation.


The simple fact of the matter is that it's likely that a lot of those assholes didn't have migraines. I started getting them around age 13 and until I was in my mid 20's, would often have them for at least one week at a time. Sometimes, months at a time. But I didn't snap nor even tell anyone about them. I was on butalbitol for the latter half of my teens. It's a narcotic, essentially, that you develop a resistance too. To top it all off, it's not that the pain totally went away with the drug - you simply didn't care as much about it. It was like being functionally drunk, which I only realized as an adult. Thank god for Imitrex - it broke the cycle and I only get them a couple times a year now (31 yrs old).

Biggest revelation for me, though, was finding out that the phenomenon that my brother and I experienced as kids wasn't only real, but effects many kids out there - and some adults. It's called "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome. Everyone experiences it a bit differently, but it comes down to the world around you looking like you're seeing it through the wrong end of a pair of binoculars. My brother and I, as kids, used to describe it as seeing far away. Your sense of depth and ability to navigate isn't impaired but everything looks too small (or big for other people) and your limbs feel like they're the wring size.

It's terrifying as a kid, and I'm one of the few unlucky adults who still experiences it. A low-grade anxiety attack is pretty much part and parcel with the experience. I only found out that this was related to migraines a year ago. No physical pain, though.

In any case, having an answer was a relief, if only because I found out my brother and I weren't the only ones. Unfortunetly, because it mainly effects children, it's not well known and terrifying for the kids and their parents. I'd guess this is the result of kids not having the capacity to communicate the experience in any substantive way, and then most grow out of it.
 
2012-10-01 02:35:39 AM

Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.


If it's your wife or girlfriend, after you've ushered her into that dark quiet room, stay with her if she wants you to. Shut up. Be quiet. Be there for her. If she asks you to touch her, do it, and do it exactly as she instructs you to -- no more and no less.

I've gone through both a marriage and a dating relationship with women who occasionally got migraines. Doing what they ask of you -- whether it's to leave them alone or to stay with them -- is very important. If they've had these headaches over a long stretch of their lives, they know better than anyone else on the planet when the migraine is coming and what does and doesn't help. (Ask a long-term migraine sufferer about the various migraine medications -- She'll usually be a walking encyclopedia of knowledge on that subject.) If she tells you to get the hell out, then get the hell out, and don't be butthurt by it. If she asks you to stay, then stay if you can. By this point, she's already briefed you on the dos-and-don'ts. Follow the rules and help her by doing what she asks of you.
 
2012-10-01 02:54:16 AM

Fark Me To Tears: Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.

-

If it's your wife or girlfriend, after you've ushered her into that dark quiet room, stay with her if she wants you to. Shut up. Be quiet. Be there for her. If she asks you to touch her, do it, and do it exactly as she instructs you to -- no more and no less.

I've gone through both a marriage and a dating relationship with women who occasionally got migraines. Doing what they ask of you -- whether it's to leave them alone or to stay with them -- is very important. If they've had these headaches over a long stretch of their lives, they know better than anyone else on the planet when the migraine is coming and what does and doesn't help. (Ask a long-term migraine sufferer about the various migraine medications -- She'll usually be a walking encyclopedia of knowledge on that subject.) If she tells you to get the hell out, then get the hell out, and don't be butthurt by it. If she asks you to stay, then stay if you can. By this point, she's already briefed you on the dos-and-don'ts. Follow the rules and help her by doing what she asks of you.


You sound nice.
 
2012-10-01 02:57:20 AM
I don't get migraines. About twice a year I get severe sinus infection headaches, spring and fall. They usually last four to five days and at their worst I'm hiding in a dark room wondering when the asshole that parked the dump truck on my head is going to move it while waiting for the room to stop spinning. The sporadic trips to the bathroom to serenade the porcelain god do not help either. If it is a really good one I'll see aura like hallucinations. So in terms of symptoms, it's like a migraine in reverse. The lucky thing is that if it is a bad one I get z-pack or erythromycin and a day later it's going away. But as a result I tend to be very sympathetic to migraine suffers as I think I've got a tiny glimpse into their world.

Now the funny thing is that aside from my mother-in-law, the only people that are dismissive of my sinus headaches have been migraine sufferers. One of my former bosses was the worst, right up until I yacked all over his shoes.(Hurk! "fark you Tim" Hurk!) But even then it was "wow, you really are sick." "But you threw up because of the infection, not the headache, only migraines get that bad."


And to be clear here not all migraine sufferers do that, about 25% of those I've met are dismissive after I mention the dark room, the spins, and the rest. About half of those relent when I say I'd rather pass a kidney stone as mine hurt less.
 
2012-10-01 03:25:10 AM
FTFA: While it is usually not yet possible to see changes in labs or imaging in the Migraineur to prove their neurological disease exists...

Actually, spots in the white matter are fairly common on MRI scans of Migraineurs' brains. How old is the info in this article?
 
2012-10-01 03:35:28 AM
I get hemiplegic migraines. It starts off with bright flashes of light in my vision, like a car flashing headlights, then I start to feel confused and freeze up which proceeds to garbled speech, then no speech and paralysis of the left side. After 10 or 15 minutes of lying on the floor, then the pain kicks in. A massive dose of ibuprofen right away and a dark quiet room can cut off the full effects before they start. Without the ibuprofen, I start to regain control of my body and then weep as I eventually hit my head on the floor trying to relieve the pressure and pain. I've wanted to cut my skull open and chuck my brain across the room.

You really need a paper to explain it to people before it gets bad. People think it's a stroke. I've had two ambulance bills from being taken in to emergency - worst place for a migraine, bright lights, lots of noise, etc.
 
2012-10-01 03:39:10 AM
Marijuana was the goto migraine medication until it was made illegal.

When i was a kid I suffered from cluster headaches and took about a dozen different meds from docs including various narcs. All made the situation worse. It really farked up my life.
Finally got sick of worthless doctors with their worthless pharma.
Started using what should have been the first thing to be prescribed. Got the headaches under
control, got better.

The fact is that it is illegal to prescribe the best treatment is beyond comprehension to me. I hope all the assholes in the world supporting this policy get to experience the wanton Hell they put people through one day.
 
2012-10-01 04:16:29 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


Hi! I'm mcmnky. Never drink coffee and gave up daily soda a few years ago. (easier way to lose weight than exercising)

Now we've met. I've had migraines my whole life. My parents tell me when I was a baby I would cry and cry and cry. Nothing they tried would calm me. After a while I'd puke and stop crying.

When I got old enough to talk, I could them about the "headaches" that got worse and worse and worse, and suddenly go away when I puked.
 
2012-10-01 04:20:53 AM

Cheese eating surrender monkey: enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.

I get chronic migraines and the stupid questions stopped the day I puked on a co-worker.


Basically unemployed, employed part-time but the questions ended when I started asking the same procedure questions several times a day and forgetting what I was working on.
 
2012-10-01 04:26:37 AM

Jixa: Unoriginal_Username: pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.

Excedrin Migraine has caffeine as a pain reliever aid, so you are correct

/That stuff is awesome, though the ones I can get from Canada are even better.

This.
The Excedrin works for me most of the time but my favourite are the "Canadian Tylenol" (Acetaminophen, caffeine, and codeine - OTC in Canada), the small amount of codeine really helps to take the edge off enough for me to function until bedtime when I can take something stronger (Sumatriptan, Frovatriptan, or Midrin) and knock myself out. Unfortunately, I'm running out of medication, don't have insurance, and I live in Texas so I can't get to Vancouver as often as I'd like. :p


At the beginnings or my migraines I took Excedrine Migraine and I was awake for 2 and a half days.
 
2012-10-01 04:31:40 AM

farkplug: FTFA: While it is usually not yet possible to see changes in labs or imaging in the Migraineur to prove their neurological disease exists...

Actually, spots in the white matter are fairly common on MRI scans of Migraineurs' brains. How old is the info in this article?


Yep, I got 'em. Fun to learn that. I was told not to worry about it, that it's perfectly normal.

D:
 
2012-10-01 04:38:00 AM

Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.


Right hand or left hand? Or doesn't it matter?
 
2012-10-01 04:59:57 AM

Nogale: Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.

Right hand or left hand? Or doesn't it matter?


Both hands. It's a weird trigger point that relates to pain and pressure in the head. It's been used for tooth pain as well.
 
2012-10-01 06:39:49 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Wild Eyed and Wicked: Bathia_Mapes: Forty-Two: The weirdest migraine I had occurred while I was teaching a writing class. I couldn't see things in the center of my field of vision (previous migraines had affected my peripheral vision). The brain does its best to compensate for things it can't see, but when I needed actual details from the blind spots (like, words on a page), my brain couldn't supply the answers. I called on students to read things off the overhead (since I could no longer read them), then I ended class slightly early. I hadn't experienced a migraine in about 5 years, but fortunately I recognized the bizarre symptoms. I consider myself lucky that migraines don't manifest with pain for me, but they're definitely debilitating.

/Migraines are weird and manifest differently for different people.

Sounds like that might have been an ocular migraine. They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?



Kind of like the above. First time I had one of those it scared the crap out of me because I'd never heard of ocular migraines & had no idea what was happening.

I have had that happen a few times before but I mostly get the blind spots like the one mentiined above - once had to get an employee read what his record said on my computer because I could not see the spot I was looking at. I could see things in my periphrial vision but would lose it when I tried to actually look at it. Usually I just get the "fireworks" that just sparkle on the outer edges of my vision.

I am lucky - hsve not had a migraine in about one year...I don't wish them on anyone.

Do the 'fireworks' look anything like this? If so, that's scatoma, a common visual aura symptom. Mine look more like this, though this is a poor representation. (I saw a better one once, but I'm not finding it now.) They're also usually nearer the centre of my vision, so while I'm not 'blind' there when it ...


Well, that's slightly disconcerting. I had one of those happen to me 2 winters ago. I thought it was just because I had stayed up too long (up for 30 some odd hours). It happened about 30 minutes before I was going to leave work. Had to call someone to pick me up from work. It went away and never came back. Neat, I had a migraine. I guess.

/Had one "headache" migraine when I was 15
//I can't believe people actually live with that crap on a monthly or weekly basis.
 
2012-10-01 06:43:55 AM

Unoriginal_Username: pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.

Excedrin Migraine has caffeine as a pain reliever aid, so you are correct

/That stuff is awesome, though the ones I can get from Canada are even better.


Wait...wait...wait....why are the Canadian version better?
 
2012-10-01 06:59:37 AM
30+ year sufferer here. I discovered Goody's Headache Powder about 10 years ago and take it when I feel something isn't right. Thankfully, it is more readily available now.

I have chewable baby aspirin always on hand.

I take topomax daily and carry imitrex pills with me.
 
2012-10-01 07:05:13 AM
I used to get one every couple of weeks from the age of 30, assumed it was food related and eventually decided that onions and chocolate set it off. It turned out to be due to huge surges in blood pressure after big meals or anything strenuous, they didn't last very long so were difficult to detect but the drop back down caused the capiliaries to shrink and start the pain/nausia which usually lasted several days. Once I started on meds for the BP I never had them again.
 
2012-10-01 07:15:06 AM

Monkey2: When I was a kid my Grandpa would tell me about having headaches so severe that he would literally bang his head against a wall. I just thought my crazy old war veteran grandpa had lost his mind when he was involved in taking France in WWII. I was wrong. I got my first one at age 22. Yeah, migraines have driven me to actually strike my head against a wall. I'm not really a people person and I pretty much don't like anyone aside from my immediate family, my wife. and a few select close friends. I wouldn't wish that level of pain on anyone, for any reason. It is truly horrific, in ways that you non-sufferers could never imagine.


Cluster headache, centered behind the eye socket? Or "true" migraine?

/genuinely curious
//has the former
 
2012-10-01 07:16:52 AM

pute kisses like a man: /Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


There might be a reason for that ...

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

I used to go through low-level migraines several times a week. No visual distortions or anything like that, just enough to make me really tired. I was not a coffee-drinker.

...until I took a cup during a real migraine attack. I could almost feel the coffee wash the migraine out of my head. I've been drinking coffee ever since. The daily low-level attacks are all but gone, or so weak that I can ignore them. 2-3 cups a day keeps the migraines away. The real attacks can be killed off by chugging 3-4 cups soon after the first symptoms appear (flashing blue/yellow lines, etc).
 
2012-10-01 07:18:01 AM

NeoCortex42: Unfortunately, there's so many foods that trigger migraines, just figuring out what to eat can be a pain in the ass some times.


Chocolate does it for me.

*sigh*
 
2012-10-01 07:27:27 AM

Mister Peejay: There was a FARKer who told me a year or so ago to try drinking a Red Bull at the onset of symptoms.


Red Bull, huh? I'll have to give that one a shot. See how it compares to the coffee-bombing I usually do.
 
2012-10-01 07:32:59 AM

Bathia_Mapes: They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?


That's how my real attacks start; a dot of flashing blue/yellow lines in the middle. The dot turns into a short, thick horizontal lines that slowly expands and curves (like half the circle on your pic) until it reaches the edges of my visual field and is gone. Then the rest of the symptoms appear (fingers pushing eyes out from inside head, nausea, that awful taste in my mouth, dizziness, the headaches. etc)
 
2012-10-01 07:38:48 AM

Cucullen: Marijuana was the goto migraine medication until it was made illegal.


source?

I use it for mild attacks. It don't make the pain go away, but it make the pain more bearable, I don't feel like banging my head against the wall or blowing it up with a gun and can instead relax and watch a dumb movie or sleep if possible.
For the worst attacks, it don't help, only opiates will. And sumatriptan, in both cases.
 
2012-10-01 07:41:50 AM
I've known a few migraine sufferers. They all have my sincerest sympathies.

/Chronic pain sufferer.
//My body can't heal properly.
///Stupid bad genes.
 
2012-10-01 08:03:51 AM
Mine are brought on by lack of caffeine, which is why I think they usually occur on the weekends.

During the week, my routine includes 1 or 2 large coffees in the morning, but on the weekend if I'm being lazy, I don't make coffee or get up early so I find myself suffering from caffeine withdrawal by mid-morning and a migraine by mid-afternoon. Of course without the coffee I'm not thinking clearly enough to recognize what's going on until it's too late.
 
2012-10-01 08:12:19 AM
I've noticed that once I fall asleep with a migraine I may sleep 6 to 12 hours. The weird part to me is that when I wake up I feel awesome. And it's not just that the migraine is gone. The world seems more vivid: colors are brighter but there's more to it than that. It's like all my senses are heightened. My whole body feels great and I'm on some sort of emotional high that usually lasts a day or two. It's a very productive time for me.

Anybody else have similar experiences?
 
2012-10-01 08:24:39 AM
Yes, it feels like resurrection. Unreal. I've felt the same when suddenly recovering from the flu. I think sometimes you feel so horrible for so long you forget what a healthy body feels like, and when health floods back the experience is amazing.
 
2012-10-01 08:26:06 AM
I had my first migraine at age 14 (now 34). Spent many years trying to identify a trigger but still no luck. Visual aura leads with severe pain to follow if I try and "push on" and ignore it.

A codeine pill and 10 minutes with my eyes shut, if caught within 1-2 minutes of the visual onset, is enough to suppress it. Ignore it and it'll render me useless for the rest of the day.

Finally found an accurate visual representation of the aura.
 
2012-10-01 08:40:25 AM

Psylence: RivenSilver: The best thing you can say to them is "Here's some LSD."

Yea... that and mushrooms. Despite the fact that both are easily available I just cannot bring myself to try it out when I have a migraine. The thought of being trapped in a psychedelic migraine hell is just too much.. I already pray for death when I have a migraine.


Psilocybin is useful more for prevention than treatment, and has been studied mostly in cluster headaches.

I suffer from mild migraines which totally mess up my vision for about 20 minutes then develop into a thankfully mild headache that lasts a few hours. Untreated, this would occur a few times a week and was more in the "annoyance" category... e.g., I'd need to find a place to pull over when driving when they started, as I'd be pretty much blind for a little while. In my 20's (50+ now) I did have a few more classical migraines with the "clutch head and roll on floor in dark room; please shoot me" sort and I'm very thankful that what I've had since are so mild.

I've not needed taken my sumatriptan in 11 months since taking a few fairly intense "voyages"

/yes, it's just another anectdote
//plural of "anectdote" is "data"
 
2012-10-01 08:41:04 AM
Wow, buncha whiners in this thread.
 
2012-10-01 08:42:08 AM
Oops, meant to add that the reports I've read suggest that psilocybin is prophylactic for 6 to 12 months... so I might need to find some fungi soon.
 
2012-10-01 08:45:37 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


This is BS. I have migraines and am not into coke/coffee/tea in any big way (Occasional cuppa tea some days). So clearly you haven't met a large class of people who have migraines.

Caffeine can help migraines by constricting blood flow in the brain, this can sometimes be useful. If you look at Excedrin's ingredients it has caffeine in it for this reason. It doesn't work for all, and is something to discuss with a doctor.

(Excedrin and Excedrin Migraine are chemically identical, b.t.w.).

/Hate Migraines
//have ocular effects with mine
///they are kind of pretty if it didn't hurt so much
 
2012-10-01 08:53:02 AM

CokeBear: Mine are brought on by lack of caffeine, which is why I think they usually occur on the weekends.

During the week, my routine includes 1 or 2 large coffees in the morning, but on the weekend if I'm being lazy, I don't make coffee or get up early so I find myself suffering from caffeine withdrawal by mid-morning and a migraine by mid-afternoon. Of course without the coffee I'm not thinking clearly enough to recognize what's going on until it's too late.


That is just caffeine withdrawal. Stop drinking caffeine and the problem will go away forever.

I had a friend who drank (I'm not kidding here) 3 pots of coffee a day. And did so 7 days a week for many years. Then one day he realized that he was addicted to coffee and quit cold turkey. Had a headache for 3 days while his body detoxed.
 
2012-10-01 09:21:57 AM
I'm a little late to this party, but as someone with a close family member who suffers frequent and debilitating migraines, I'd like to give a hearty fark you to the insurance companies for the hoops they make you jump through to get hold of triptans. There aren't any generics yet so the drug makers are still gouging people on them and the insurance companies, who are pulling in many thousands of dollars a year on my policy, are all pissy about having to pay a few hundred to cover them.

Do your farking jobs, assholes. This is exactly why I have insurance. Because shiat happens and you agreed to pay for it when it did.
 
2012-10-01 09:39:25 AM
I thought that Sumatriptan was a generic Imitrex?
 
2012-10-01 09:40:44 AM
Please, you sound like you have an entitlement.

You joined a risk pool and the administrator's task is to make sure that no one is taking advantage of the other risk pool members.

Because you probably live in a state where insurance is highly regulated these conditions were spelled out into great detail in the plan documents. Now that they are almost all electronic there is even greater detail. The regulators even make them published simple versions. Best of both worlds simple and detailed.

So, how do you want it? The insurance companies to give away all of the money of the risk pool so they run out fast, or make sure there is no fraud?

Or do you want them just to give you what you want and break everyone else's b*lls.
 
2012-10-01 09:52:07 AM
Late in the thread, but what the hell:

ZeroCorpse: So, migraine sufferers, how are we to tell the difference between you and the dolt who has come to use the word "migraine" to substitute for "bad headache" or "caffeine addiction headache"? We can't actually see how much you're suffering and compare it to the bullshiatters. We can't feel what you feel. We can't know if you're one of the dumbasses who takes Excedrin every six hours and then gets headaches when it wears off, or if you are a legit migraine sufferer.


As someone who started getting migraines at age 8 and is still getting them at age 41, I can offer a few anecdotal observations as to how to tell the difference:

- A fake migrainuer is looking for extra sympathy, and will often be quite vocal about 'how much it hurts' to elicit a response from others; a real migraineur is in too much pain to say much of anything. Usually, even one's own voice is too much sound to bear during an episode, so most prefer silence.

- A fake migraineur is usually looking for attention & will become increasingly agitated if no one fawns over him/her; a real migrainuer just wants to be left alone.

- A fake migraineur will only complain about lights/sounds if someone is listening to them, if they remember to complain about these things at all; a real migraineur just puts on sunglasses, turns the lights & tv/music off before going about their daily business.

- A fake migraineur will complain about their headache, but still come to work wearing strong perfume/cologne; a real migraineur opts for unscented beauty products, esp. during an episode.

- A fake migraineur will promptly announce, after returning from the restroom, that they got violently sick (again, looking for sympathy); a real migraineur will quietly excuse him/herself, then return quietly after the umpteenth time they've worshiped the porcelain gods.

- Real migraineurs usually look very pale, possibly greenish (due to the nausea); some will also squint or blink/rub their eyes a lot (for those dealing with the visual aura) - most fakers aren't that invested in their 'story' to go to that level of detail.

The tl;dr version: Fake migraineurs are looking for attention & so draw attention to themselves, while people with the real deal just want to crawl off like wounded animals & find a quiet place to die.
 
2012-10-01 10:14:37 AM

rickycal78: INTERTRON: Hack Patooey: I get maybe two a month now, down from two a week about ten years ago. Imetrix is the only thing that helps, but, like others, I feel like Ive been worked over with a bat. Put me in a dark room with a heat pack over my eyes, and Ill be fine eventually. I envision my migraine like grapes in a giant vat of clear liquid, and I scoop them out one at a time, feeling my migraine go away. Eventually Ill fall asleep and wake up hours later, mostly human again.

Blah

I find that heat works better than an ice pack, too. I tend to situate a recliner right beside the microwave. Then, I fold a damp washcloth in half, roll it up, and microwave for 30 seconds. Lay back in the recliner for those seconds. Then, I fetch the cloth, put it over my face, and breathe deeply and slowly until it cools off. Repeat.

As you can see, I don't have a heat pack.

Heat works for me as well. if you don't have a hot pack you can make yourself a rice sock. Get a clean sock, dump enough rice in it to fill up about half of the part of the sock where your foot would sit. Tie the top of the sock into a knot and throw in the microwave for 45 seconds to a minute. Works great for muscle aches too.


SWMBO made a half dozen of these, sewn together nicely, out of old towels and rice. Two minutes in the microwave gives me about 15 minutes of "My face is almost on fire" heat. I also will stand in the shower with 'as-hot-as-I-can-stand-it' water pounding on the top of my head. That works, too.
 
2012-10-01 10:16:08 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: whiz


Indeed. Immediately after the surgery, I had no more migraines. The surgery, ironically, was for an unrelated condition. Beforehand, I had two states of being: feelin' fine and my head's gonna explode.

When I got my first "normal" headache after the surgery, I remember telling my wife, "So this is what you putzes are complaining about? Look, I can walk and eat and move!"
 
2012-10-01 10:22:00 AM

Nogale: Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.

Right hand or left hand? Or doesn't it matter?


I've seen it in both hands at the same time before, although one is always bigger and more prominent. Otherwise, it can switch hands, or stay with just one for awhile... No real pattern that I can guess on.
 
2012-10-01 10:26:23 AM

StandsWithAFist: Late in the thread, but what the hell:

ZeroCorpse: So, migraine sufferers, how are we to tell the difference between you and the dolt who has come to use the word "migraine" to substitute for "bad headache" or "caffeine addiction headache"? We can't actually see how much you're suffering and compare it to the bullshiatters. We can't feel what you feel. We can't know if you're one of the dumbasses who takes Excedrin every six hours and then gets headaches when it wears off, or if you are a legit migraine sufferer.

As someone who started getting migraines at age 8 and is still getting them at age 41, I can offer a few anecdotal observations as to how to tell the difference...


Sweet! Now I know how to fake having a migraine properly! j/k
 
2012-10-01 10:31:05 AM

Shirley Ujest: Unoriginal_Username: pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.

Excedrin Migraine has caffeine as a pain reliever aid, so you are correct

/That stuff is awesome, though the ones I can get from Canada are even better.

Wait...wait...wait....why are the Canadian version better?


It contains a moderate dose of an opiate and is available on demand over the counter, whereas equivalent American drugs are available only by prescription.
 
zez
2012-10-01 10:42:23 AM

Uncle Tractor: Bathia_Mapes: They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?

That's how my real attacks start; a dot of flashing blue/yellow lines in the middle. The dot turns into a short, thick horizontal lines that slowly expands and curves (like half the circle on your pic) until it reaches the edges of my visual field and is gone. Then the rest of the symptoms appear (fingers pushing eyes out from inside head, nausea, that awful taste in my mouth, dizziness, the headaches. etc)


That's what happens to me too. I feel bad for the people who get migraines without the flashing because at least I know what's coming up in 20-30 minutes and can prepare.

also, this video is the best example I've found to explain what I'm seeing since words don't do it justice.
Link
 
2012-10-01 01:38:09 PM

zez: Uncle Tractor: Bathia_Mapes: They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?

That's how my real attacks start; a dot of flashing blue/yellow lines in the middle. The dot turns into a short, thick horizontal lines that slowly expands and curves (like half the circle on your pic) until it reaches the edges of my visual field and is gone. Then the rest of the symptoms appear (fingers pushing eyes out from inside head, nausea, that awful taste in my mouth, dizziness, the headaches. etc)

That's what happens to me too. I feel bad for the people who get migraines without the flashing because at least I know what's coming up in 20-30 minutes and can prepare.

also, this video is the best example I've found to explain what I'm seeing since words don't do it justice.
Link


That's a pretty good visualization. For me, the best way I can describe it is that the words just fall off the page when I'm reading. Dark splotches would appear. I remember reading one book as a migraine started to hit and realizing that I was having to tilt my head to the side to try to "fit" all of the words into my narrowed vision.
 
2012-10-01 02:01:28 PM

radiobiz: I've noticed that once I fall asleep with a migraine I may sleep 6 to 12 hours. The weird part to me is that when I wake up I feel awesome. And it's not just that the migraine is gone. The world seems more vivid: colors are brighter but there's more to it than that. It's like all my senses are heightened. My whole body feels great and I'm on some sort of emotional high that usually lasts a day or two. It's a very productive time for me.

Anybody else have similar experiences?


Nope, same thing. The world feels brighter, field of vision feels super-wide, everything has everything amplified past 11.

And OMG do i get hungry.
 
2012-10-01 02:53:09 PM
I have chronic migraines and get +/- 10 per month. What I really love are the jerks who say they get them too but amazingly 1 excedrin will knock it out and they look like superstars while I need my maxalt and a dark place to lie down for an hour or two and I'm still foggy for the rest of the day.

I am especially excited when the manager says to me, why can't you just take an excedrin like Sally does?
 
2012-10-01 04:10:06 PM
I had migraines during my early teen years and I remember begging my mother to just kill me the pain was so horrific. I learned to take a couple of Benadryls to knock myself for 12 hours when I started getting an aura. Thankfully I've not gotten one in over 20 years. I wouldn't wish that pain on ANYONE.
 
2012-10-01 05:13:48 PM

On-Off: source?

I use it for mild attacks. It don't make the pain go away, but it make the pain more bearable, I don't feel like banging my head against the wall or blowing it up with a gun and can instead relax and watch a dumb movie or sleep if possible.
For the worst attacks, it don't help, only opiates will. And sumatriptan, in both cases.


Avoid using narcs for chronic pain, it's a bad idea.

"Father of Modern Medicine" William Osler, describes mj as probably the most satisfactory treatment for migraine.

Osler W. (1913) The principles and practice of medicine 8th ed. (New York: Appleton) p1089


This guys's talking about it right here to, give what credence to the video, but its more or less in line with what I've read from more legitimate sources.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4B6fARJlqMg
 
2012-10-01 06:25:37 PM
Migraines run in my family. My mother blessed both I and my sister with them, and we all have the same triggers.

Barometric pressure is a big one. If the barometric pressure changes too quickly, I'll get a migraine, starting in the sinuses. I used to have to drive between Virginia and South Carolina, and coming down the mountain on I-77 was a guaranteed way to give me a migraine so bad I could barely walk. I learned I could lessen the effects by slamming an energy drink or coffee, anything with lots of caffeine, and taking Sudafed and Aspirin.
Another is rapid flashing lights or colors, or anything that involves intense eyestrain. Biggest offender is 3D movies, though any movie will do it if I sit too close.

I usually know they're coming when I get auras, or whatever the equivalent is... I see what I've dubbed "The Shadow People" just to sound creepy. They're just black spots and shapes that blink in and out of my peripheral vision. Then I'll notice my vision "ghosting" or "trailing", that is, images, especially lights, seem to smear across my vision like some kind of slow motion camera effect. If it progresses beyond that, I see "The Tunnel" which is a blind-spot in the center of my vision, and sometimes it looks like stuff is coming out of it, at me.
My words start to get garbled, and though my mind can think them, my mouth can't say them. General dizziness and nausea. Sometimes I get really laughy. There's pain, and I hate everything, but I can't stop laughing.

Scariest migraine I ever had, I was working at a Walgreens and in the middle of a customer transaction, it was as if my vision of the world were the reflection on a still pond, and then a drop of water disturbed the surface right in the center of my vision. I almost passed out, and the sudden onset of migraine symptoms made me barely able to finish the transaction. My boss was nice enough to let me sit in the backroom for a while, but I needed to go home after that...
 
2012-10-01 06:26:55 PM
I know I'm late to the party, but as of the beginning of the year, I was having 1-2 debilitating migraines a month. I moved from Boston down to Newport, RI at the beginning of the year, and I think my stress levels weren't as bad so I got maybe one a month. Then, in June, a friend brought a reiki practitioner to my house and he "worked" on me for like a half hour. I'm a skeptic however I honestly have not had one since. I haven't quit eating cheese, drinking wine/booze, sporadically drinking caffeinated drinks or really stopped doing anything--and they've stopped.

..I just hope I don't jinx myself by mentioning this lol
 
2012-10-01 07:31:32 PM
Don't say "Wow, you sure get sick a lot." I know I do. It's why I take daily meds, make sure to sleep regularly, and rarely drink more than a few beers. The rub is that if I didn't do all those things I couldn't work and function at all. These days thanks to 160mg propanalol (beta blocker) per day I often get auras without the pain, but it still means I can't drive a car or meet you for a beer somewhere.

zez: this video is the best example I've found to explain what I'm seeing since words don't do it justice.


Very close to mine, though mine always starts in the exact center of my field of vision and grows outward until I can't really focus on much of anything. Weird part is I never had any kind of headache until I was 35. For my first I ended up in the ER thinking I was having an aneurysm. Couldn't believe I'd live through it, let alone feel that way a few times each month for the rest of my life.

Farkers might enjoy this Link to an article written by Jeff Tweedy of Wilco. He does a better job explaining migraines than most and how they affect you over time.
 
2012-10-01 08:54:04 PM

born_yesterday:

Out of curiosity, are there particular foods that commonly cause migranes?


I don't know how common this is among migraine sufferers, but I have to be extremely careful about how much chocolate I consume in a given period, or I'll be knocked dead.

Nitrates and various preservatives (MSG etc) also hurt me a lot.
 
2012-10-01 10:03:54 PM
Vangor, and others with cluster headache, or supporting someone with cluster headache, there is a great FB support group. And it is absolutely stupid that this government will not even allow *study* into the one substance that seems to offer long term control for this. And that is not a party statement. Administrations of both parties have steadfastly refused to allow study in this field for decades.

Sorry migraineurs, but while migraine can be one of the worst pains a human can endure, CH is *the* worst. The pain mechanism bypasses all of the methods your body employs to reduce or eliminate pain due to trauma. It's a direct, unregulated stimulation of the trigeminal pain nerves; damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead. Try to imagine having a root canal without anesthetic. In all the teeth on one side of your head. At the same time. Starting in your eyeball. For two hours. Three times a night. Every night. Then go to work. For six weeks. Or three months. Or six months. Women with cluster headache will tell you that one is more painful that giving birth without anesthetic.

I almost hate whoring out CH on a migraine thread, but our condition is so poorly recognized that we need to leech on all the attention we can get in order to get recognition so that hopefully the better options for treatment won't be either illegal or ratcheted down under the control of expensive Big Pharma.

All I'd like to say is that if you ever end up on a jury for someone using an illegal treatment for CH, cut the guy a break. Give him not-guilty. Hang the jury. Do something for him. He's living with a torture you can't imagine.
 
2012-10-01 11:24:12 PM

Fark Me To Tears: Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.

If it's your wife or girlfriend, after you've ushered her into that dark quiet room, stay with her if she wants you to. Shut up. Be quiet. Be there for her. If she asks you to touch her, do it, and do it exactly as she instructs you to -- no more and no less.

I've gone through both a marriage and a dating relationship with women who occasionally got migraines. Doing what they ask of you -- whether it's to leave them alone or to stay with them -- is very important. If they've had these headaches over a long stretch of their lives, they know better than anyone else on the planet when the migraine is coming and what does and doesn't help. (Ask a long-term migraine sufferer about the various migraine medications -- She'll usually be a walking encyclopedia of knowledge on that subject.) If she tells you to get the hell out, then get the hell out, and don't be butthurt by it. If she asks you to stay, then stay if you can. By this point, she's already briefed you on the dos-and-don'ts. Follow the rules and help her by doing what she asks of you.


As wife to a male migraine sufferer, I agree that this goes for the opposite sex, too. Follow orders and don't talk more than necessary while doing so.
 
2012-10-01 11:51:30 PM

Kejlina: I used to get migraines when I was a kid; First I'd get weird visual effects; blind spots, flashing lights. Then crippling head pain, light hurts, sound hurts, even the pillow hurts. Finally, the puking.

Ugh. Wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.


Exactly same for me. My first migraine was when I was 13 or so. I had no idea what wa happening. My mother was in the hospital and I rode public transportation to visit her. On my way home, I was having visual problems and black spots. I got more and more queasy as I went. I got home, ran through the front door, barely made it to the bathroom and threw up. The vision issue almost IMMEDITALY ceased.

From then on, they were pretty frequent through puberty. Now I get them mostly from light flashes (camera flash, glint from chrome when driving, etc). I have learned to adapt and only get maybe 1-2 a year.

/rarely have actual pain
 
2012-10-02 03:26:56 AM

Bathia_Mapes:

Sounds like that might have been an ocular migraine. They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?

i1.allaboutvision.com
Kind of like the above. First time I had one of those it scared the crap out of me because I'd never heard of ocular migraines & had no idea what was happening.


It would be cool if someone could photoshop/animate that.

Either change the grayed areas to tv tuned to no channel or triangles of that sparkley rainbow foil stuff that screams 1970s.
 
2012-10-02 04:27:23 AM

Wild Eyed and Wicked: Usually I just get the "fireworks" that just sparkle on the outer edges of my vision.


I get occasional migraines, with light, sound and odor sensitivity, and sparkles: pinpoint flashes of light similar to what you see when someone is welding. I've had these outside of the migraine but, oddly, never associated them with a painless migraine before. Next time I need to talk with a Dr about the migraine, I'll make sure to mention them.
 
2012-10-02 05:15:21 AM

Mister Peejay: Nope, same thing. The world feels brighter, field of vision feels super-wide, everything has everything amplified past 11.


Not how it is with me. The day after a full migraine (rare after I started with the coffee) I generally feel wobbly, floaty ... disconnected. Can't focus on anything.

And OMG do i get hungry.

I get the munchies during the attacks, not after.
 
2012-10-02 05:17:03 AM

Gimli_Gloin: So, how do you want it? The insurance companies to give away all of the money of the risk pool so they run out fast, or make sure there is no fraud?


How about national healthcare like the rest of the world has? Health insurance is just a scam.
 
2012-10-03 01:26:35 AM
I tend to get more migraines in the Spring and Fall when my allergies give me the worst problems, red wine can kick them off too. When I get one they usually last three days and I am utterly useless when I'm in the seventh level of hell. I get the problems with sound/light/smell issues as well.

Although I've had them for a good twenty years or more I've never been put on any medication for them, I've gone to ER's and urgent care clinics for them a couple of times and they give me a shot that knocks me and the migraine out, this will, about 65% of the time stop it and I don't have to deal with a full three days. Self administered herbal remedy does help with the "Baby" and "Teenaged" ones but the "Adult" ones are unconquerable.

But really, "Migraineur"... Do we need a title that sounds like we're members of an elite club. If I don't pay my dues will they kick me out?

/Please?
//Not paying.
///I don't want to be a member!
 
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