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(Migraine.com)   Twelve things NOT to say to a someone with chronic migraines. No mention of Drew's favorite: "How about a beer?"   (migraine.com) divider line 185
    More: Obvious, preventive medicines, medical sign, Social Security Disability, serotonin, migraines, systemic disease, chronic, increased heart rate  
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6161 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Sep 2012 at 4:23 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-30 10:32:58 PM  

whizbangthedirtfarmer: I used to have awful migraines (during which time I discovered that most migraine medication was intended to simply knock your ass out). Then I had sinus surgery, and I haven't had a migraine since.


Yep, trigeminal insult migraine. I'm sure it's much more common than even most doctors think. I even suspect that the constant assault on our sinuses (one of the more telling and common aspects of the industrial disease that plagues much of the developed world) is likely an original source for a lot of young-adult-onset of migraine.
 
2012-09-30 10:35:01 PM  

KerwoodDerby: I've never gotten a painful migraine, thank goodness, but I have gotten those "silent" migraines episodically, the ones that obscure one's vision with spots and patterns. In my case, it was associated with an untreated case of sleep apnea, and was also accompanied by hypertension (like 165/130 hypertension, resting).

/I know, IANAD, but I thought I'd toss that little data point out there because the ultimate diagnosis was a total surprise to me.


That was my diagnosis, too, more or less: trigeminal insult from essential hypertension. Once the HT was under control, so was the migraine.
 
2012-09-30 10:36:49 PM  

Christian Bale: What bullshiat. If something actually worked for someone else, there's a chance it COULD work for you. Even if that chance is miniscule (and it's NOT "miniscule beyond measure") it could be worth a shot. You're free to ignore it.


I do not think the author was suggesting nothing would work for them as much as "migraineurs" do research and have tried lists of treatments, medications, diets, behaviors, etc.. When people give little remedies, those people often never had the condition. I know of no one else who has cluster headaches, but there are always folks trying to tell my mother what works for them with simple headaches. Otherwise, the people who did have the condition are actively sought out with support groups and such because this is where sufferers do some research on the list of remedies to try.
 
2012-09-30 10:37:55 PM  

kyuzokai: I was surprised to hear about migraine induced strokes. A good friend of mine (and frequent migraine sufferer) recently had a stroke. He is in his 30s and in great health, so it seemed to come out of left field. I wondered if the two (migraine and stroke) might be related, and it appears that is at least plausible.


There's some thought (there was an article here about this last year, I think) that chronic migraine, after years of it, can cause permanent changes to brain structure and function, including damage that can lead to things like stroke. But some migraine attacks, thankfully rare, can do this already, so you don't necessariy need years of it to reach that point. Epilepsy can kill, too (directly, not merely incidentally), and they are related.
 
2012-09-30 10:38:59 PM  

kazikian: Also the twelve things not to say to someone who has ulcerative colitis/Crohn's.


The only thing I ever say to people with such disorders is some version of, "Is there anything I can do?"
 
2012-09-30 10:44:01 PM  

kertus: Triggers: red wine & scotch (Congeners), old cheese, nuts.


Jesus, what a life. If I couldn't eat a can of cashews with a slab of Tilsit and rinse it all down with 21 year old Glenfarclas, I'd get a migraine.
 
2012-09-30 10:44:16 PM  

Christian Bale: I read about something new that can cure Migraine or Have you tried this? It worked for a friend of mine. While Migraineurs want to know that our loved ones are thinking about us and want to help us, the chance that you have stumbled upon a miraculous treatment or "cure" that our specialists - or we who have suffered terribly with this disease - have not, is miniscule beyond measure.


What bullshiat. If something actually worked for someone else, there's a chance it COULD work for you. Even if that chance is miniscule (and it's NOT "miniscule beyond measure") it could be worth a shot. You're free to ignore it.


The point isn't that it might not help us, but rather the assumption -- much more common than you might guess, though perhaps not -- that we haven't already heard of it. When you're a regular sufferer, migraine becomes your second job, a full-time hobby, and we all become very well-informed experts on it. There is, as TFA says, probably nothing you've ever heard of, or ever will, that we haven't, or won't very soon. It's not impossible, but it's pretty unlikely. It's like suggesing to a Firefly fan some other Nathan Fillion stuff they may not have heard of, because, you know, they might like that. Your point is entirely valid, but misplaced.
 
2012-09-30 10:46:39 PM  
when one is coming on for me [i've only had mild ones i think] i see a green tint or aura outlining objects and a slight change in my hearing like there is more treble in sounds. i go to bed for 4-8 hours even if i start to feel better after an hour.
 
2012-09-30 10:47:29 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: kertus: Triggers: red wine & scotch (Congeners), old cheese, nuts.

Jesus, what a life. If I couldn't eat a can of cashews with a slab of Tilsit and rinse it all down with 21 year old Glenfarclas, I'd get a migraine.


I was at university when wine AND cheese parties were all the rage. Took me a while to put 2 and 2 together... Life was misery.
 
2012-09-30 10:48:27 PM  

Mikey1969: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: This "99%" crap is just that, I'm sorry. I'm happy for those it helps, really. But it didn't help me, and if it really did help 99% of the time, we'd all know about it. Hell, someone would have gotten a Nobel for it by now. I'd whittle it for them myself. With my teeth

Actually, many doctors DO know about it, I or my wife has mentioned it to different doctors, at different times before, and their response has been positive, reinforcing, and always affirming that it is a known pressure point that causes relief for migraines.

But that doesn't matter anyway, since you want to be a prick, no matter what. If you don't know about it, it obviously doesn't exist, you know the only "real" solutions, yadda, yadda, yadda. I know how it goes. That's cool though, I don't know you, so I don't give two farks what you think about migraine relief. Make sure that you don't lower yourself t having someone try it as a relief agent some day, wouldn't want it to turn out to work and make you look like a bitter fool.


It sounds like you only skimmed my comment, and only actually took in the last para. That's unfortunate, because had you taken in the whole of it, you'd know that I already addressed everything you said. And I never said that doctors didn't know about it, or that anyone else didn't. In fact, I said the opposite: We've all heard of it, and we've all tried it, and yes, it helps some of us, to some degree, some of the time. But not 99%, and it doesn't "help 99% of the time." That part is indeed crap, and you've got nothing at all to base that figure on.
 
2012-09-30 11:13:27 PM  
Here's the problem: It's hard for us to tell the difference between a person who has genuine migraines, and a person who THINKS they do because the Excedrin ads told them so. If I had a nickel for every time I heard someone describe their normal headache as "a migraine", I'd probably have a shiatload of nickels.

So, migraine sufferers, how are we to tell the difference between you and the dolt who has come to use the word "migraine" to substitute for "bad headache" or "caffeine addiction headache"? We can't actually see how much you're suffering and compare it to the bullshiatters. We can't feel what you feel. We can't know if you're one of the dumbasses who takes Excedrin every six hours and then gets headaches when it wears off, or if you are a legit migraine sufferer.

So really, how about instead of giving us a list of things not to say to you, you do like the rest of the people in the world with serious illnesses and disabilities and COPE WITH THE PROBLEM WITHOUT EXPECTING EVERYONE ELSE TO UNDERSTAND OR ACCEPT IT.

I have a variety of physical ailments and problems (GERD is not "just heartburn" by the way. It feels like a goddamn knife is being pushed through my heart when it kicks in. And chronic back pain may not "show" to everyone else, but I sure as hell feel it.) and I just push through my day and cope with it. My fiance has fibromyalgia, and she faces horrific days filled with pain and anguish-- The kind of pain that makes migraines look like Excedrin headaches-- and she doesn't make a big deal of people "understanding" her pain. She just tells them she's in pain, needs to go rest or cope with it, and leaves them to work out their own issues.

I sympathize with serious migraine sufferers. They should also sympathize with me (oh, yeah, I also have mild tinnitus, which SUCKS, even though it doesn't cause actual pain). But I don't get pissy when someone tells me to go take a pill for my back pain, or compares their back ache to my chronic pain caused by fused vertebrae, or acts like their heartburn is the same thing as when I miss a dose of my meds and my reflux hits me hard. I cope with it, deal with the problem, and let the rest of the world deal with their own problems.
 
2012-09-30 11:16:05 PM  

enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.


This is basically what I was saying. Chronic sicknesses are misunderstood. Expecting people to research, learn, and sympathize with your particular problem is unrealistic. Deal with it. We all do.
 
2012-09-30 11:19:20 PM  
I've only had a handful of migraines in my lifetime, but enough to sympathize. They usually start with "sprinkles" in my eyes, and the inability to focus on things. Then for a few hours, I feel like a Xenobite, having hooks driven into my skull plates and hung from them.
I'm a Helpful Henry most of the time, but when someone tells me they have a migraine, I turn off the lights and leave.
 
2012-09-30 11:22:25 PM  

Unoriginal_Username: pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.

Excedrin Migraine has caffeine as a pain reliever aid, so you are correct

/That stuff is awesome, though the ones I can get from Canada are even better.


This.
The Excedrin works for me most of the time but my favourite are the "Canadian Tylenol" (Acetaminophen, caffeine, and codeine - OTC in Canada), the small amount of codeine really helps to take the edge off enough for me to function until bedtime when I can take something stronger (Sumatriptan, Frovatriptan, or Midrin) and knock myself out. Unfortunately, I'm running out of medication, don't have insurance, and I live in Texas so I can't get to Vancouver as often as I'd like. :p
 
2012-09-30 11:23:46 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: But not 99%, and it doesn't "help 99% of the time."


Well, the point is that YES it works 99% on my wife, which is what my original post stated, but whatever.
 
2012-10-01 12:16:18 AM  

Mikey1969: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: But not 99%, and it doesn't "help 99% of the time."

Well, the point is that YES it works 99% on my wife, which is what my original post stated, but whatever.


What you actually wrote (since you've apparently forgotten):

"Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. YOU can almost always find a knot in this, but YOU actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If YOU pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , YOU will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone."

[emphasis mine]

Yeah, I can't imagine how anyone might figure you were talking about anyone but your wife there. Unless you're inviting everyone reading that to do that for her.
 
2012-10-01 12:17:49 AM  

Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.


Does it matter which hand? Is one hand usually better for a person than the other--i.e., if they have success one time with one hand, do they keep using it (assuming a person has both hands)?
 
2012-10-01 12:29:12 AM  
A friend of mine was prescribed pure oxygen. He would get migraines before tests and nearly rolled out of college. The little tank of O2 did the trick. True story.
 
2012-10-01 12:31:48 AM  

farkplug: Does it matter which hand? Is one hand usually better for a person than the other--i.e., if they have success one time with one hand, do they keep using it (assuming a person has both hands)?


The meditative therapy that I have been taught involves tensing and flexing several muscle groups in my body. The core principle is that migraine attacks are often directly connected to blood flow problems that are unique to the sufferer. Mikey's wife seems to have a critical knot in her hands. I personally get minor relief from massaging my forehead and the back of my neck.
 
2012-10-01 12:32:18 AM  

farkplug: Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.

Does it matter which hand? Is one hand usually better for a person than the other--i.e., if they have success one time with one hand, do they keep using it (assuming a person has both hands)?


It changes, not sure if either one is more often, but there have been times where my wife has one knot in each hand, but one will be a bigger knot than the other. It's like a little marble in there, and you can feel it go down until it's gone.
 
2012-10-01 12:59:57 AM  

pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.


It does. I saw caffeine pills at the drugstore "for migraines".
 
2012-10-01 01:23:22 AM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: How can I be the first after almost 100 posts?!?!?!?!

[i291.photobucket.com image 100x80]

WHERE HAS MY FARK GONE?!???!?!!


That shiat was never cool and you should feel bad.
 
2012-10-01 01:29:33 AM  

RivenSilver: The best thing you can say to them is "Here's some LSD."


Actually, my mom's current migraine med is a relative of LSD. Although the med's warnings say "don't mix with LSD" in a round about way.
 
2012-10-01 01:32:36 AM  
I had a friend whose sister suffers from chronic migraines. Even if she takes something when she feels one coming on, the pain still knocks her out for a good day or so. It didn't matter what she ate or did that day, if one was going to happen, it would happen.

So of COURSE the first thing she does when it causes her to fail out of school is decide to take a chance at passing that along to a baby.
 
2012-10-01 01:54:10 AM  

wyltoknow: Ex: Man I'm having another shiatty migraine attack. We should have sex, it'll make me feel better or something.
Me: Ehh well I don't think so, usually sex just makes you feel worse and you can't even finish because of the pain.
Ex: Nah, nah! It'll work this time, promise.

Then the rest of the day complaining about how it feels 100 times worse. Farking retarded.


Yes, you were.

RivenSilver: The best thing you can say to them is "Here's some LSD."


I was in the test group for cafergot. It did nothing for me.
/Except make me puke.
 
2012-10-01 02:14:00 AM  

KrispyKritter: over the years, different places i worked there were some people who would suffer horrible migraines. my honest observation: happened to the worst people. people that were always nasty, back stabbers, adulterers, you name it. i had no sympathy. i'm not saying this about you or your loved one who suffers from this terrible thing. i'm just saying, in the workplace i saw a whole lot of people get them that almost seemed to deserve them. i don't mean to offend anyone with my life observation.


The simple fact of the matter is that it's likely that a lot of those assholes didn't have migraines. I started getting them around age 13 and until I was in my mid 20's, would often have them for at least one week at a time. Sometimes, months at a time. But I didn't snap nor even tell anyone about them. I was on butalbitol for the latter half of my teens. It's a narcotic, essentially, that you develop a resistance too. To top it all off, it's not that the pain totally went away with the drug - you simply didn't care as much about it. It was like being functionally drunk, which I only realized as an adult. Thank god for Imitrex - it broke the cycle and I only get them a couple times a year now (31 yrs old).

Biggest revelation for me, though, was finding out that the phenomenon that my brother and I experienced as kids wasn't only real, but effects many kids out there - and some adults. It's called "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome. Everyone experiences it a bit differently, but it comes down to the world around you looking like you're seeing it through the wrong end of a pair of binoculars. My brother and I, as kids, used to describe it as seeing far away. Your sense of depth and ability to navigate isn't impaired but everything looks too small (or big for other people) and your limbs feel like they're the wring size.

It's terrifying as a kid, and I'm one of the few unlucky adults who still experiences it. A low-grade anxiety attack is pretty much part and parcel with the experience. I only found out that this was related to migraines a year ago. No physical pain, though.

In any case, having an answer was a relief, if only because I found out my brother and I weren't the only ones. Unfortunetly, because it mainly effects children, it's not well known and terrifying for the kids and their parents. I'd guess this is the result of kids not having the capacity to communicate the experience in any substantive way, and then most grow out of it.
 
2012-10-01 02:35:39 AM  

Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.


If it's your wife or girlfriend, after you've ushered her into that dark quiet room, stay with her if she wants you to. Shut up. Be quiet. Be there for her. If she asks you to touch her, do it, and do it exactly as she instructs you to -- no more and no less.

I've gone through both a marriage and a dating relationship with women who occasionally got migraines. Doing what they ask of you -- whether it's to leave them alone or to stay with them -- is very important. If they've had these headaches over a long stretch of their lives, they know better than anyone else on the planet when the migraine is coming and what does and doesn't help. (Ask a long-term migraine sufferer about the various migraine medications -- She'll usually be a walking encyclopedia of knowledge on that subject.) If she tells you to get the hell out, then get the hell out, and don't be butthurt by it. If she asks you to stay, then stay if you can. By this point, she's already briefed you on the dos-and-don'ts. Follow the rules and help her by doing what she asks of you.
 
2012-10-01 02:54:16 AM  

Fark Me To Tears: Fabric_Man: The best thing to say is nothing. Just gently usher them into a dark, quiet room with their medicine (if any), and let them ride it out.

-

If it's your wife or girlfriend, after you've ushered her into that dark quiet room, stay with her if she wants you to. Shut up. Be quiet. Be there for her. If she asks you to touch her, do it, and do it exactly as she instructs you to -- no more and no less.

I've gone through both a marriage and a dating relationship with women who occasionally got migraines. Doing what they ask of you -- whether it's to leave them alone or to stay with them -- is very important. If they've had these headaches over a long stretch of their lives, they know better than anyone else on the planet when the migraine is coming and what does and doesn't help. (Ask a long-term migraine sufferer about the various migraine medications -- She'll usually be a walking encyclopedia of knowledge on that subject.) If she tells you to get the hell out, then get the hell out, and don't be butthurt by it. If she asks you to stay, then stay if you can. By this point, she's already briefed you on the dos-and-don'ts. Follow the rules and help her by doing what she asks of you.


You sound nice.
 
2012-10-01 02:57:20 AM  
I don't get migraines. About twice a year I get severe sinus infection headaches, spring and fall. They usually last four to five days and at their worst I'm hiding in a dark room wondering when the asshole that parked the dump truck on my head is going to move it while waiting for the room to stop spinning. The sporadic trips to the bathroom to serenade the porcelain god do not help either. If it is a really good one I'll see aura like hallucinations. So in terms of symptoms, it's like a migraine in reverse. The lucky thing is that if it is a bad one I get z-pack or erythromycin and a day later it's going away. But as a result I tend to be very sympathetic to migraine suffers as I think I've got a tiny glimpse into their world.

Now the funny thing is that aside from my mother-in-law, the only people that are dismissive of my sinus headaches have been migraine sufferers. One of my former bosses was the worst, right up until I yacked all over his shoes.(Hurk! "fark you Tim" Hurk!) But even then it was "wow, you really are sick." "But you threw up because of the infection, not the headache, only migraines get that bad."


And to be clear here not all migraine sufferers do that, about 25% of those I've met are dismissive after I mention the dark room, the spins, and the rest. About half of those relent when I say I'd rather pass a kidney stone as mine hurt less.
 
2012-10-01 03:25:10 AM  
FTFA: While it is usually not yet possible to see changes in labs or imaging in the Migraineur to prove their neurological disease exists...

Actually, spots in the white matter are fairly common on MRI scans of Migraineurs' brains. How old is the info in this article?
 
2012-10-01 03:35:28 AM  
I get hemiplegic migraines. It starts off with bright flashes of light in my vision, like a car flashing headlights, then I start to feel confused and freeze up which proceeds to garbled speech, then no speech and paralysis of the left side. After 10 or 15 minutes of lying on the floor, then the pain kicks in. A massive dose of ibuprofen right away and a dark quiet room can cut off the full effects before they start. Without the ibuprofen, I start to regain control of my body and then weep as I eventually hit my head on the floor trying to relieve the pressure and pain. I've wanted to cut my skull open and chuck my brain across the room.

You really need a paper to explain it to people before it gets bad. People think it's a stroke. I've had two ambulance bills from being taken in to emergency - worst place for a migraine, bright lights, lots of noise, etc.
 
2012-10-01 03:39:10 AM  
Marijuana was the goto migraine medication until it was made illegal.

When i was a kid I suffered from cluster headaches and took about a dozen different meds from docs including various narcs. All made the situation worse. It really farked up my life.
Finally got sick of worthless doctors with their worthless pharma.
Started using what should have been the first thing to be prescribed. Got the headaches under
control, got better.

The fact is that it is illegal to prescribe the best treatment is beyond comprehension to me. I hope all the assholes in the world supporting this policy get to experience the wanton Hell they put people through one day.
 
2012-10-01 04:16:29 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


Hi! I'm mcmnky. Never drink coffee and gave up daily soda a few years ago. (easier way to lose weight than exercising)

Now we've met. I've had migraines my whole life. My parents tell me when I was a baby I would cry and cry and cry. Nothing they tried would calm me. After a while I'd puke and stop crying.

When I got old enough to talk, I could them about the "headaches" that got worse and worse and worse, and suddenly go away when I puked.
 
2012-10-01 04:20:53 AM  

Cheese eating surrender monkey: enik: You could apply a list like that to any chronic sickness people suffer from. I get stupid comments like those all the time when dealing with asthma.

I get chronic migraines and the stupid questions stopped the day I puked on a co-worker.


Basically unemployed, employed part-time but the questions ended when I started asking the same procedure questions several times a day and forgetting what I was working on.
 
2012-10-01 04:26:37 AM  

Jixa: Unoriginal_Username: pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.

Excedrin Migraine has caffeine as a pain reliever aid, so you are correct

/That stuff is awesome, though the ones I can get from Canada are even better.

This.
The Excedrin works for me most of the time but my favourite are the "Canadian Tylenol" (Acetaminophen, caffeine, and codeine - OTC in Canada), the small amount of codeine really helps to take the edge off enough for me to function until bedtime when I can take something stronger (Sumatriptan, Frovatriptan, or Midrin) and knock myself out. Unfortunately, I'm running out of medication, don't have insurance, and I live in Texas so I can't get to Vancouver as often as I'd like. :p


At the beginnings or my migraines I took Excedrine Migraine and I was awake for 2 and a half days.
 
2012-10-01 04:31:40 AM  

farkplug: FTFA: While it is usually not yet possible to see changes in labs or imaging in the Migraineur to prove their neurological disease exists...

Actually, spots in the white matter are fairly common on MRI scans of Migraineurs' brains. How old is the info in this article?


Yep, I got 'em. Fun to learn that. I was told not to worry about it, that it's perfectly normal.

D:
 
2012-10-01 04:38:00 AM  

Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.


Right hand or left hand? Or doesn't it matter?
 
2012-10-01 04:59:57 AM  

Nogale: Mikey1969: The ONE thing to say?

"Can I rub your hand?"

Seriously, there's a trigger point that will help 99% of the time, right in the webbing between the thumb and the index finger. You can almost always find a knot in this, but you actually have to be pretty brutal to get this to work. If you pinch the fark out of this knot, and hold it , you will fell it noticeably reduce in size, and within a few minutes, it will be almost completely gone. Oftentimes, my wife will fell her head throbbing, which is a good sign, it means the blood is flowing freely again. Within half an hour or so, the worst of the migraine is gone.

It's a great solution, but like I said, you have to work that thing hardcore... It doesn't help when my wife has the DEFCON 1 migraines, but it's amazing how well it works. Worst part about migraines is identifying the triggers, they could be absolutely anything, it seems that lack of sleep is a pretty common factor for her. Luckily we haven't had to try an elimination diet, that shiat can take forever, trying to nail downa specific food item that causes them.

Right hand or left hand? Or doesn't it matter?


Both hands. It's a weird trigger point that relates to pain and pressure in the head. It's been used for tooth pain as well.
 
2012-10-01 06:39:49 AM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Wild Eyed and Wicked: Bathia_Mapes: Forty-Two: The weirdest migraine I had occurred while I was teaching a writing class. I couldn't see things in the center of my field of vision (previous migraines had affected my peripheral vision). The brain does its best to compensate for things it can't see, but when I needed actual details from the blind spots (like, words on a page), my brain couldn't supply the answers. I called on students to read things off the overhead (since I could no longer read them), then I ended class slightly early. I hadn't experienced a migraine in about 5 years, but fortunately I recognized the bizarre symptoms. I consider myself lucky that migraines don't manifest with pain for me, but they're definitely debilitating.

/Migraines are weird and manifest differently for different people.

Sounds like that might have been an ocular migraine. They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?



Kind of like the above. First time I had one of those it scared the crap out of me because I'd never heard of ocular migraines & had no idea what was happening.

I have had that happen a few times before but I mostly get the blind spots like the one mentiined above - once had to get an employee read what his record said on my computer because I could not see the spot I was looking at. I could see things in my periphrial vision but would lose it when I tried to actually look at it. Usually I just get the "fireworks" that just sparkle on the outer edges of my vision.

I am lucky - hsve not had a migraine in about one year...I don't wish them on anyone.

Do the 'fireworks' look anything like this? If so, that's scatoma, a common visual aura symptom. Mine look more like this, though this is a poor representation. (I saw a better one once, but I'm not finding it now.) They're also usually nearer the centre of my vision, so while I'm not 'blind' there when it ...


Well, that's slightly disconcerting. I had one of those happen to me 2 winters ago. I thought it was just because I had stayed up too long (up for 30 some odd hours). It happened about 30 minutes before I was going to leave work. Had to call someone to pick me up from work. It went away and never came back. Neat, I had a migraine. I guess.

/Had one "headache" migraine when I was 15
//I can't believe people actually live with that crap on a monthly or weekly basis.
 
2012-10-01 06:43:55 AM  

Unoriginal_Username: pute kisses like a man: HotIgneous Intruder: How about, "HAVE MORE DIET COKE AND COFFEE!"

/Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

/ increases breathing and blood flow. also good for people who are having trouble breathing.

Excedrin Migraine has caffeine as a pain reliever aid, so you are correct

/That stuff is awesome, though the ones I can get from Canada are even better.


Wait...wait...wait....why are the Canadian version better?
 
2012-10-01 06:59:37 AM  
30+ year sufferer here. I discovered Goody's Headache Powder about 10 years ago and take it when I feel something isn't right. Thankfully, it is more readily available now.

I have chewable baby aspirin always on hand.

I take topomax daily and carry imitrex pills with me.
 
2012-10-01 07:05:13 AM  
I used to get one every couple of weeks from the age of 30, assumed it was food related and eventually decided that onions and chocolate set it off. It turned out to be due to huge surges in blood pressure after big meals or anything strenuous, they didn't last very long so were difficult to detect but the drop back down caused the capiliaries to shrink and start the pain/nausia which usually lasted several days. Once I started on meds for the BP I never had them again.
 
2012-10-01 07:15:06 AM  

Monkey2: When I was a kid my Grandpa would tell me about having headaches so severe that he would literally bang his head against a wall. I just thought my crazy old war veteran grandpa had lost his mind when he was involved in taking France in WWII. I was wrong. I got my first one at age 22. Yeah, migraines have driven me to actually strike my head against a wall. I'm not really a people person and I pretty much don't like anyone aside from my immediate family, my wife. and a few select close friends. I wouldn't wish that level of pain on anyone, for any reason. It is truly horrific, in ways that you non-sufferers could never imagine.


Cluster headache, centered behind the eye socket? Or "true" migraine?

/genuinely curious
//has the former
 
2012-10-01 07:16:52 AM  

pute kisses like a man: /Never have met a person who had migraines who also wasn't also a caffeine and/or soda addict.


There might be a reason for that ...

i don't know anything about medicine, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear that caffeine helps migraine sufferers. it helps absolutely everything else.

I used to go through low-level migraines several times a week. No visual distortions or anything like that, just enough to make me really tired. I was not a coffee-drinker.

...until I took a cup during a real migraine attack. I could almost feel the coffee wash the migraine out of my head. I've been drinking coffee ever since. The daily low-level attacks are all but gone, or so weak that I can ignore them. 2-3 cups a day keeps the migraines away. The real attacks can be killed off by chugging 3-4 cups soon after the first symptoms appear (flashing blue/yellow lines, etc).
 
2012-10-01 07:18:01 AM  

NeoCortex42: Unfortunately, there's so many foods that trigger migraines, just figuring out what to eat can be a pain in the ass some times.


Chocolate does it for me.

*sigh*
 
2012-10-01 07:27:27 AM  

Mister Peejay: There was a FARKer who told me a year or so ago to try drinking a Red Bull at the onset of symptoms.


Red Bull, huh? I'll have to give that one a shot. See how it compares to the coffee-bombing I usually do.
 
2012-10-01 07:32:59 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: They tend to be either pain free or the pain isn't all that severe. Have you ever gotten them where you get the zig-zag patterns in your visual field?


That's how my real attacks start; a dot of flashing blue/yellow lines in the middle. The dot turns into a short, thick horizontal lines that slowly expands and curves (like half the circle on your pic) until it reaches the edges of my visual field and is gone. Then the rest of the symptoms appear (fingers pushing eyes out from inside head, nausea, that awful taste in my mouth, dizziness, the headaches. etc)
 
2012-10-01 07:38:48 AM  

Cucullen: Marijuana was the goto migraine medication until it was made illegal.


source?

I use it for mild attacks. It don't make the pain go away, but it make the pain more bearable, I don't feel like banging my head against the wall or blowing it up with a gun and can instead relax and watch a dumb movie or sleep if possible.
For the worst attacks, it don't help, only opiates will. And sumatriptan, in both cases.
 
2012-10-01 07:41:50 AM  
I've known a few migraine sufferers. They all have my sincerest sympathies.

/Chronic pain sufferer.
//My body can't heal properly.
///Stupid bad genes.
 
2012-10-01 08:03:51 AM  
Mine are brought on by lack of caffeine, which is why I think they usually occur on the weekends.

During the week, my routine includes 1 or 2 large coffees in the morning, but on the weekend if I'm being lazy, I don't make coffee or get up early so I find myself suffering from caffeine withdrawal by mid-morning and a migraine by mid-afternoon. Of course without the coffee I'm not thinking clearly enough to recognize what's going on until it's too late.
 
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