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(American Library Association)   Happy 30th Banned Books Week. The ALA celebrates with a list of books which turned you into the godless heathens with dirty mouths and bad attitudes that you are. (Bonus: Not a slide show)   (ala.org) divider line 99
    More: Cool, Banned Books Week, banned books, lists of books  
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10365 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Sep 2012 at 1:15 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-29 01:20:48 PM
i548.photobucket.com

Librarian thread!
 
2012-09-29 01:20:50 PM
I would like to take this opportunity to thank the moral watchdog groups for their tireless efforts to expand my reading list. When I was a little jaded, nothing would send me running to a book faster than hearing it got the bunched panty brigade in an uproar and wanted to read what all the fuss was about. So keep on with the good fight, you confused sons of biatches you.

/ waits patiently for more books to add to Amazon wishlist
 
2012-09-29 01:21:51 PM
Fahrenheit 451 is a how-to manual?
 
2012-09-29 01:23:43 PM
I'll be the first to reiterate: if your ideology is so weak that it cannot withstand the existance of alternative ideas, let alone criticism or scrutiny, it is a failed ideology, and you have failed at the most basic level of being a human.

That's what I love about the school of history; we keep getting older, but the morons stay the same.
 
2012-09-29 01:23:49 PM
I remember my middle school librarian quietly celebrating banned book week by putting a stack of bookmarks on the checkout desk. They had a list of the top banned books printed on them. I didn't realize how cool she was for that until much latter in life.
 
2012-09-29 01:23:54 PM
Isn't that literally a slide-show?
 
2012-09-29 01:24:53 PM
(Bonus: Not a slide show)

But...
 
2012-09-29 01:25:57 PM

born_yesterday: I'll be the first to reiterate: if your ideology is so weak that it cannot withstand the existance of alternative ideas, let alone criticism or scrutiny, it is a failed ideology, and you have failed at the most basic level of being a human.

That's what I love about the school of history; we keep getting older, but the morons stay the same.


www.mysecretstache.com
 
2012-09-29 01:29:27 PM

born_yesterday: if your ideology is so weak that it cannot withstand the existance of alternative ideas, let alone criticism or scrutiny, it is a failed ideology, and you have failed at the most basic level of being a human.



I WILL be using that line..... and often
 
2012-09-29 01:31:32 PM

Tax Boy: [i548.photobucket.com image 300x267]

Librarian thread!


hot librarian thread?
 
2012-09-29 01:34:05 PM
Judy Blume made that list? Well props to her.
 
2012-09-29 01:35:25 PM
Looks like a slider show to me...
 
2012-09-29 01:36:15 PM

Tax Boy: [i548.photobucket.com image 300x267]

Librarian thread!


tenaanval.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-09-29 01:37:58 PM
imageshack.us
 
2012-09-29 01:38:18 PM
I just set up our library's banned books table a couple of days ago. Every one of the books in the slide show that we carried was included. I made sure to also include Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed, which has faced some challenges recently because people don't like its political viewpoint. I find that type of censorship a lot more troubling than attempts to remove books from middle or elementary school libraries because they contain some naughty words.
 
2012-09-29 01:39:45 PM
It baffles me that with the wealth of information readily and speedily available to people these days, that some folks are still trying to get books banned. What a stupid wasted of time and effort.
 
2012-09-29 01:40:39 PM

Allen262: Looks like a slider show to me...


www.thelivingmoon.com
 
2012-09-29 01:41:17 PM
My high school is on that list, though they got the state wrong. Attempted to ban the Harry Potter books.

And now, a public service announcement:

AK - Stands for Alaska
AR - Stands for Arkansas

-=*
The more you know.
 
2012-09-29 01:41:40 PM
Many christian groups in America fear books that propose ideas they perceive as contrary to their beliefs and social values. The irony is that the best book to read to undermine those very beliefs and values is the one they swear is the good book:

mcdonaldroad.org

That book itself is what pushed me out of their faith and into the light of reason and critical thought.

Irony. They don't get it.
 
2012-09-29 01:45:44 PM

Richard Roma: I just set up our library's banned books table a couple of days ago. Every one of the books in the slide show that we carried was included. I made sure to also include Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed, which has faced some challenges recently because people don't like its political viewpoint. I find that type of censorship a lot more troubling than attempts to remove books from middle or elementary school libraries because they contain some naughty words.



I was expecting most of the pathetic reasons on the list, but the explanation for why "Pedagogy of the Oppressed" was pulled really disturbed me.

FTA: "In 2012, under threat of violating state law and losing state funding, the Tucson (AZ) Unified School District voted to cut its Mexican American Studies (MAS) program. "Pedagogy of the Oppressed" and numerous other books affiliated with the MAS program were found in violation, removed from the curriculum, and stored in district storehouses. Freire's seminal work, published in 1968 and translated into English in 1970, challenges traditional relationships between teachers and students, calling for an educational environment where learners are not treated as empty vessels for information but rather are respected as active participants in the learning process."
 
2012-09-29 01:45:48 PM

Heamer: It baffles me that with the wealth of information readily and speedily available to people these days, that some folks are still trying to get books banned. What a stupid wasted of time and effort.


If only there was a good, Christian internet provider...
 
2012-09-29 01:47:30 PM
i like books.

i like smut.

i like smutty books

go ask alice though?
lol
 
2012-09-29 01:48:21 PM
Normally I don't think books should be banned, but TTYL, an entire book written in text message format can't have a single redeeming quality.

/I went to High School in the Northeast and the South in the early 1990s not surprisingly Banned Books Week was not celebrated in the South.
 
2012-09-29 01:52:26 PM
Know what I hate even more than slideshows? Captions that you have to click the "more" button.
 
2012-09-29 01:54:38 PM
The thing I find really disturbing is when some of these efforts were made, up to and including 2012? Really, people? FFS.
 
2012-09-29 01:56:27 PM
Read most of those when i was in school. Of course I was in AP English and those were pretty much the norm while the other English teacher was struggling with her students to get them to even come to the library let alone pick up a book that had more text than pictures. I did see one on there that made the news here the other day,
"The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian"
I haven't read that one but apparently a teacher at an OKC school let the students read it. Problem that everyone was having was these were sixth graders and it was above their level (intended for high school students)
I remember when I got passed from 3rd grade to the 4th grade the librarian gave me an end of school present. It was a set of abridged Charles Dickens classics. That summer I was basically a bookworm. Got made fun of in school for how many books I read but at least it is something I love to do.
 
2012-09-29 01:56:37 PM

Catlenfell: Fahrenheit 451 is a how-to manual?


Interestingly enough, Bradbury wrote that about a perceived growth of television over print. The perception that 451 is about book burning is so strong that he was at least once told in person that he was wrong about his own book.
 
2012-09-29 01:58:53 PM

Tom_Slick: Normally I don't think books should be banned, but TTYL, an entire book written in text message format can't have a single redeeming quality.

/I went to High School in the Northeast and the South in the early 1990s not surprisingly Banned Books Week was not celebrated in the South.


Being banned and being ignored for its blatant stupidity are two vary different things: namely because the prior takes away a young persons chance to formulate an opinion for them self, which is apart of that whole learning / growing up thing.
 
2012-09-29 02:00:13 PM

I. R. Rottweiler: The thing I find really disturbing is when some of these efforts were made, up to and including 2012? Really, people? FFS.


Doesn't surprise me in the slightest. I'm in South Carolina at the moment, and some people are currently up in arms about the opening prayer being replaced by a moment of silence at school board meetings, and also HS football games.

I'm Catholic, and think praying is great. What I don't get though, is these people that insist on making damn sure everybody else knows they're praying. Pray at home, pray at church, don't be a dick to people. That should be good enough.
 
2012-09-29 02:01:03 PM

alwaysjaded: I would like to take this opportunity to thank the moral watchdog groups for their tireless efforts to expand my reading list. When I was a little jaded, nothing would send me running to a book faster than hearing it got the bunched panty brigade in an uproar and wanted to read what all the fuss was about. So keep on with the good fight, you confused sons of biatches you.

/ waits patiently for more books to add to Amazon wishlist


I finally read Catcher in the Rye about 4 years ago, and I don't know if it was because I waited until I was a grownup with responsibilities, I just hated Caulfield and hated his whiny misadventures. I suppose to an adolescent he might be kinda cool back in the day.
 
2012-09-29 02:01:08 PM
Anyone who wants to ban Huckleberry Finn for racism, and has read the book, is almost certainly a fanatic.
Anyone who wants to ban Huckleberry Finn for racism, and hasn't read the book, at least has the potential excuse of being too emotionally immature to think for themselves. Yet.

I've only read a few of the others.

I acknowledge I've had a hard time coming to grips w/ my reaction to books like "My Daddy's Roommate." Listening to Bill Hicks routines helps though. Comedians are like philosophers in that way, they encourage you to think about your assumptions. You become firmer in some of your conclusions after they are challenged, but others get that pesky perspective-thingy added...
 
2012-09-29 02:04:08 PM

Tom_Slick: Normally I don't think books should be banned, but TTYL, an entire book written in text message format can't have a single redeeming quality.

/I went to High School in the Northeast and the South in the early 1990s not surprisingly Banned Books Week was not celebrated in the South.


Yeah, it's not like anyone has ever tried to capture the language of a particular audience to tell a story about them or something.

Oh wait...isn't that what Mark Twain was all famous for and whatnot?
 
2012-09-29 02:04:58 PM
These aren't banned books, nor are these books being prevented from publishing or being read. These are(mostly) books introduced in schools, which parents and teachers voiced concerns over, sometimes removeing from required reading lists. Talk about a non-controversy. By the same definition, hustler is a banned magazine because its not permitted in schools. Sheesh. Isn't there enough to get worked up over in this world without fabricating more crap?
 
2012-09-29 02:05:47 PM
Banning classic books is just wrong. These books reflect the values and thoughts of society before those banning the books were born, in some cases. Leave them be. You cannot go back in your time machine and change things to suit you.
 
2012-09-29 02:07:16 PM

UsikFark: Catlenfell: Fahrenheit 451 is a how-to manual?

Interestingly enough, Bradbury wrote that about a perceived growth of television over print. The perception that 451 is about book burning is so strong that he was at least once told in person that he was wrong about his own book.



www.destgulch.com

Are you sure it wasn't about a dystopian society bent on the repression of information exchange? Because I'm pretty sure that was a main theme.
 
2012-09-29 02:08:17 PM

Agent Smiths Laugh: Many christian groups in America fear books that propose ideas they perceive as contrary to their beliefs and social values. The irony is that the best book to read to undermine those very beliefs and values is the one they swear is the good book:

[mcdonaldroad.org image 299x224]

That book itself is what pushed me out of their faith and into the light of reason and critical thought.

Irony. They don't get it.


Oh they get it. The Bible was, either explicitly or in effect, banned for well over a millennium. No citation for this, but I'm sure the Bible is the most thoroughly banned book in world history.
 
2012-09-29 02:09:26 PM
Catlenfell


Fahrenheit 451 is a how-to manual?

In one of Bradbury's forwards (don't remember which book off hand) he goes off on a rant about when he found a version of 451 that had been printed with edits to remove "objectionable" content.
 
2012-09-29 02:09:31 PM
It's all books that certain groups felt shouldn't be read in schools. By students. Because it will turn them evil or something.

I've read most of those. Of all the books I've read, by far the only one that really challenged my conviction that nothing should be censored is Brett Easton Ellis' "American Psycho", which was so brutal in some scenes that I felt physically and mentally exhausted after reading them.

But that was before the internet.

Now nothing shocks me anymore, and I still hold fast to the ideal that nothing should ever be censored.
 
2012-09-29 02:12:41 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2012-09-29 02:14:04 PM

Agent Smiths Laugh: Many christian groups in America fear books that propose ideas they perceive as contrary to their beliefs and social values. The irony is that the best book to read to undermine those very beliefs and values is the one they swear is the good book:

[mcdonaldroad.org image 299x224]

That book itself is what pushed me out of their faith and into the light of reason and critical thought.

Irony. They don't get it.


Way back in the dark ages when I was in school there was an instance of a city ordering the librarian to put "adult themed" books in an adults only section. They gave her a list of criteria she had to follow to determine what went into the adults section as well as a list of specific books, some in that list were considered children's classics (Huck Finn, for instance). She retaliated by putting the bible in the adults section based on their rules. Hilarity ensued.

No, it didn't happen in my town. It was just something my dad had me read about -- he was an English teacher and loathed narrow minded religious fanatics.
 
2012-09-29 02:15:11 PM

Ishkur: I've read most of those. Of all the books I've read, by far the only one that really challenged my conviction that nothing should be censored is Brett Easton Ellis' "American Psycho", which was so brutal in some scenes that I felt physically and mentally exhausted after reading them.


You mean the writing was brutally bad?
 
2012-09-29 02:15:34 PM
Sex by Madonna is on that list. I don't have a problem with that. It should be banned for being absolute shiat.
 
2012-09-29 02:20:40 PM
Too bad about a few fundie idiots banning the "His Dark Materials" trilogy. They're amazing books. Stupid thin-skinned over-sensitive bible thumpers...
 
2012-09-29 02:22:29 PM

AliceBToklasLives: The Bible was, either explicitly or in effect, banned for well over a millennium.


It wasn't banned insomuch as it was made inaccessible to the masses. The Bible was written in Latin, and no one could read Latin, so they needed the church to tell them what was in the Bible. Translations of the Bible into English (such as the John Wycliffe version) were punishable death. Then William Tyndale translated the first full Bible into English in 1530. He was strangled to death and then posthumously burned at the stake for his efforts.

English language editions of the Bible did not become acceptable until the King James Version, and that is the version most Christians still swear by today.
 
2012-09-29 02:23:43 PM

JonZoidberg: alwaysjaded: I would like to take this opportunity to thank the moral watchdog groups for their tireless efforts to expand my reading list. When I was a little jaded, nothing would send me running to a book faster than hearing it got the bunched panty brigade in an uproar and wanted to read what all the fuss was about. So keep on with the good fight, you confused sons of biatches you.

/ waits patiently for more books to add to Amazon wishlist

I finally read Catcher in the Rye about 4 years ago, and I don't know if it was because I waited until I was a grownup with responsibilities, I just hated Caulfield and hated his whiny misadventures. I suppose to an adolescent he might be kinda cool back in the day.


The brilliance of that book is how vastly one's perspective and interpretation of it changes with age.
 
2012-09-29 02:25:24 PM

Richard Roma: I made sure to also include Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed, which has faced some challenges recently because people don't like its political viewpoint


It also includes a chapter on how to pass a drug test after you've smoked marijuana and how to get prescriptions from doctors just by making a phone call.
 
2012-09-29 02:32:11 PM
Captain Underpants just doesn't seem to belong in this list.
 
2012-09-29 02:42:59 PM
Reading is one of my favorite activities, and I think people should be able to choose what they want to read. Some of those books, though, really need to be kept out of the hands of children.
 
2012-09-29 02:43:04 PM
Go ahead, ban a book. I'll bet no one will be able to find it, buy it, or read it after that. Seriously, people, it's pretty much impossible to ban a book if you don't live under one of very few authoritarian regimes in the world. These are mostly just books that are opposed for objectionable content. I wouldn't let my kid read many of them anyway. Daddy's Roommate? Gossip Girl? I think I'd rather just have my kid watch Bosom Buddies. Books with limited or no literary value that promote particular behaviors or lifestyles are basically just brainwashing.

I read quite a few books between 5th and 8th grade that were inappropriate for me, and actually hindered my development instead of promoting normal and healthy child and adolescent development. I would certainly guide my children a little better than my parents did for me.

/still not in favor of banning books. Parents should do a better job of parenting.
 
2012-09-29 02:43:11 PM

Proteios1: These aren't banned books, nor are these books being prevented from publishing or being read. These are(mostly) books introduced in schools, which parents and teachers voiced concerns over, sometimes removeing from required reading lists. Talk about a non-controversy. By the same definition, hustler is a banned magazine because its not permitted in schools. Sheesh. Isn't there enough to get worked up over in this world without fabricating more crap?


Don't go trying to bring logic into a moral outrage and philosophical superiority thread.
 
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