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(Huffington Post)   Researchers invent way to culture cancers and preview which treatments will work against each individual patient's cancer. Still no one cure for all cancer, but treating each individual case may soon be far less of a crapshoot   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 15
    More: Spiffy, cancer types, high fiber, Children's Hospital Boston, lost time, cell death, University Medical Center, American Association for Cancer Research, tumors  
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500 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Sep 2012 at 11:48 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-29 12:02:06 PM
If anyone is truly interested, I recommend looking into the Van Andel Institue, in Michigan. They have already implemented protocols in which biopsies from patients are used to evaluate potential treatments, and patients then monitored for actual effectiveness of treatments.

So, not sure why these researchers are being credited for "inventing" this. Offhand, it's probably the way they culture the cells as 3-dimensional tumor. God forbid I actually read the whole article.

Anyways, if it helps people, good on them.
 
2012-09-29 12:18:39 PM
Or you could try some CBD.
 
2012-09-29 12:49:54 PM
25.media.tumblr.com 

You're god damned right.
 
2012-09-29 01:32:22 PM
So their solution is to send the cancer cells out to the art museum and the symphony?
 
2012-09-29 04:51:03 PM

AliceBToklasLives: So their solution is to send the cancer cells out to the art museum and the symphony?


Well, there's the alternative: Sending them to a Dane Cook show and force them to watch Honey Boo Boo.
 
2012-09-29 05:18:55 PM

born_yesterday: If anyone is truly interested, I recommend looking into the Van Andel Institue, in Michigan. They have already implemented protocols in which biopsies from patients are used to evaluate potential treatments, and patients then monitored for actual effectiveness of treatments.

So, not sure why these researchers are being credited for "inventing" this. Offhand, it's probably the way they culture the cells as 3-dimensional tumor. God forbid I actually read the whole article.

Anyways, if it helps people, good on them.


I was diagnosed in 09 with a fine needle biopsy in a couple of tumors and nearby lymph nodes. Over time (weeks), Pathology reports came back with more and more info - pretty much mirroring TFA.

Having skimmed the article, I'm not clear on what is new here. Also likely I don't have enough personal understanding ...
 
2012-09-29 05:55:44 PM
This has been done for awhile. The problem is that cancers often act very differently on a dish than in a tumor. Now that whole genome sequencing has become affordable, we are sequencing many cancers and finding the genomic fingerprint that matches with the best medicine. This should prove even more effective in the long run.
 
2012-09-29 08:31:30 PM
My high school science teacher(also friend of the family) was recently diagnosed with cancer, so I'm getting a kick etc.

I still remember when he set his gradebook, clothes, and the floor on fire. Speedy recovery mr. outdoorsman.
 
2012-09-30 01:15:14 AM

JustinCase: born_yesterday: If anyone is truly interested, I recommend looking into the Van Andel Institue, in Michigan. They have already implemented protocols in which biopsies from patients are used to evaluate potential treatments, and patients then monitored for actual effectiveness of treatments.

So, not sure why these researchers are being credited for "inventing" this. Offhand, it's probably the way they culture the cells as 3-dimensional tumor. God forbid I actually read the whole article.

Anyways, if it helps people, good on them.

I was diagnosed in 09 with a fine needle biopsy in a couple of tumors and nearby lymph nodes. Over time (weeks), Pathology reports came back with more and more info - pretty much mirroring TFA.

Having skimmed the article, I'm not clear on what is new here. Also likely I don't have enough personal understanding ...


I wish you the best. I feel useless that I can't offer anything else.
 
2012-09-30 02:52:38 AM

born_yesterday: JustinCase: born_yesterday: If anyone is truly interested, I recommend looking into the Van Andel Institue, in Michigan. They have already implemented protocols in which biopsies from patients are used to evaluate potential treatments, and patients then monitored for actual effectiveness of treatments.

So, not sure why these researchers are being credited for "inventing" this. Offhand, it's probably the way they culture the cells as 3-dimensional tumor. God forbid I actually read the whole article.

Anyways, if it helps people, good on them.

I was diagnosed in 09 with a fine needle biopsy in a couple of tumors and nearby lymph nodes. Over time (weeks), Pathology reports came back with more and more info - pretty much mirroring TFA.

Having skimmed the article, I'm not clear on what is new here. Also likely I don't have enough personal understanding ...

I wish you the best. I feel useless that I can't offer anything else.


No, we're cool. I'm glad someone else had a similar reaction to TA.

Everyone has a sword of Damocles. No one knows when the time will be. Cancer patients merely have a rough estimate.

I wasn't clear before, my tissue, such as it was, was also tested for reaction to the different types of chemo, among many other things.

My particular pathology suggests a likelihood of recurrence within 5 years. Once past, I can sleep easier. That doesn't preclude a general increased chance of another tumor popping up with a completely different pathology.

18 months of chemo with concurrent radiation and surgery was an utter cold biatch, with my husband going crazy on top of the constant puking and baldness. My hair has grown back now and I can fall asleep peacefully knowing that he isn't there to hit me.

I lived through it. The air smells sweeter, colors are brighter, people are nicer and my world is infinitely better.

Reading fark also helped me get through it. Thank you for your response.

/Any grammatical or spelling errors have been induced by cheap Scotch!
 
2012-09-30 06:15:42 PM

JustinCase: born_yesterday: If anyone is truly interested, I recommend looking into the Van Andel Institue, in Michigan. They have already implemented protocols in which biopsies from patients are used to evaluate potential treatments, and patients then monitored for actual effectiveness of treatments.

So, not sure why these researchers are being credited for "inventing" this. Offhand, it's probably the way they culture the cells as 3-dimensional tumor. God forbid I actually read the whole article.

Anyways, if it helps people, good on them.

I was diagnosed in 09 with a fine needle biopsy in a couple of tumors and nearby lymph nodes. Over time (weeks), Pathology reports came back with more and more info - pretty much mirroring TFA.

Having skimmed the article, I'm not clear on what is new here. Also likely I don't have enough personal understanding ...



Submitter here. Sorry; I was going by the impression the article gave. I'm not particularly knowledgeable on this matter, and the article made it sound like pretty good news. Given that press-release-ish articles are frequently over bold, in terms of the importance they claim or imply for discoveries, I probably should have given it a more critical eye, and been more circumspect myself. Still, here's hoping it does deliver, as some sort of significant advance beyond current methods.
 
2012-09-30 06:39:59 PM

Isildur: JustinCase: born_yesterday: If anyone is truly interested, I recommend looking into the Van Andel Institue, in Michigan. They have already implemented protocols in which biopsies from patients are used to evaluate potential treatments, and patients then monitored for actual effectiveness of treatments.

So, not sure why these researchers are being credited for "inventing" this. Offhand, it's probably the way they culture the cells as 3-dimensional tumor. God forbid I actually read the whole article.

Anyways, if it helps people, good on them.

I was diagnosed in 09 with a fine needle biopsy in a couple of tumors and nearby lymph nodes. Over time (weeks), Pathology reports came back with more and more info - pretty much mirroring TFA.

Having skimmed the article, I'm not clear on what is new here. Also likely I don't have enough personal understanding ...


Submitter here. Sorry; I was going by the impression the article gave. I'm not particularly knowledgeable on this matter, and the article made it sound like pretty good news. Given that press-release-ish articles are frequently over bold, in terms of the importance they claim or imply for discoveries, I probably should have given it a more critical eye, and been more circumspect myself. Still, here's hoping it does deliver, as some sort of significant advance beyond current methods.


I'm sure this is some sort of improvement, I'm just too much of a layperson to get it. I just know what was explained to me at the time. Hopefully I'll remember to ask the oncologist about it during one of our now annual visits.

It's great that the article got greenlit. This isn't a frequent discussion for me but it seems that it's not general public knowledge. All the better for people to know that advances are being made almost daily.

Thank you for submitting this!
 
2012-09-30 08:38:04 PM

JustinCase: ...

18 months of chemo with concurrent radiation and surgery was an utter cold biatch, with my husband going crazy on top of the constant puking and baldness. My hair has grown back now and I can fall asleep peacefully knowing that he isn't there to hit me.

I lived through it. The air smells sweeter, colors are brighter, people are nicer and my world is infinitely better.

Reading fark also helped me get through it. Thank you for your response.

/Any grammatical or spelling errors have be ...


Wow- congrats on the remission, and hope it doesn't pop back
But, do yerself a favor- get a decent singlemalt. You've been through too much to drink freaking purplebag liquor
 
2012-09-30 08:54:40 PM

bitchqueen: JustinCase: ...

18 months of chemo with concurrent radiation and surgery was an utter cold biatch, with my husband going crazy on top of the constant puking and baldness. My hair has grown back now and I can fall asleep peacefully knowing that he isn't there to hit me.

I lived through it. The air smells sweeter, colors are brighter, people are nicer and my world is infinitely better.

Reading fark also helped me get through it. Thank you for your response.

/Any grammatical or spelling errors have be ...

Wow- congrats on the remission, and hope it doesn't pop back
But, do yerself a favor- get a decent singlemalt. You've been through too much to drink freaking purplebag liquor


Bwahahaha! Thank you. After the first two shots of La Phroig, I can't tell the difference!

:)
 
2012-10-01 03:32:37 AM

JustinCase: I'm sure this is some sort of improvement, I'm just too much of a layperson to get it. I just know what was explained to me at the time. Hopefully I'll remember to ask the oncologist about it during one of our now annual visits.

It's great that the article got greenlit. This isn't a frequent discussion for me but it seems that it's not general public knowledge. All the better for people to know that advances are being made almost daily.

Thank you for submitting this!



You're quite welcome. Yeah, while real life may not be conveniently simple like that "Medicine Man" movie with Sean Connery (never actually saw it, but if I remember the trailers right, it centered on a hunt for some single miraculous cure for all kinds of cancer), it's heartening to read about how researchers are always chipping away at the problem.

In general, one of the many reasons I like reading through science news is that (with the exception of certain subjects like those regarding ongoing environmental damage), there's so much meaningfully positive news, with progress being made on so many fronts. It often cheers me up, after less inspiring sorts of news stories have gotten me down.
 
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