If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(AOL)   Next time someone tells you that governmental regulation of corporations isn't needed, show them this article. Of course the right will argue that the market would have self corrected after all their customers were dead   (autos.aol.com) divider line 292
    More: Sad, PT Cruiser, Enterprise Holdings, lame duck, David Strickland, car rentals  
•       •       •

13797 clicks; posted to Politics » on 29 Sep 2012 at 9:53 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



292 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-09-29 08:06:24 AM
FTA: It's taken two years for Sen. Barbara Boxer and Sen. Chuck Schumer to get the majority of the rental car industry on board.

Can someone more learned in the ways of government than I explain why there is a need to get companies "on board" before they can pass common sence legislation?
 
2012-09-29 08:27:22 AM
Bowing to pressure from consumers and advocacy groups, major car rental companies have agreed to end the practice of renting cars that have been recalled for safety problems

They sound uncooperative. Glad Obama forced them to change.
 
2012-09-29 08:51:05 AM
Show them that AOL News still exists?
 
2012-09-29 09:19:47 AM
Chances of this getting through the Teabaggers in the House? I'll let you know after my date with Jessica Alba.
 
2012-09-29 09:31:28 AM

Krymson Tyde: FTA: It's taken two years for Sen. Barbara Boxer and Sen. Chuck Schumer to get the majority of the rental car industry on board.

Can someone more learned in the ways of government than I explain why there is a need to get companies "on board" before they can pass common sence legislation?


To make sure they don't spend millions of dollars in campaign contributions lobbying against the common sense legislation.
 
2012-09-29 09:59:04 AM
So did the hose actually leak and cause the accident?
 
2012-09-29 09:59:35 AM
I honestly cannot figure out why rental car companies would ignore recalls?
 
2012-09-29 10:00:38 AM

Krymson Tyde: FTA: It's taken two years for Sen. Barbara Boxer and Sen. Chuck Schumer to get the majority of the rental car industry on board.

Can someone more learned in the ways of government than I explain why there is a need to get companies "on board" before they can pass common sence legislation?


Need to get those board positions ready for the politicians that write the legislation.
 
2012-09-29 10:02:27 AM

cabbyman: So did the hose actually leak and cause the accident?


According to the article the steering wheel ran out of fluid.
 
2012-09-29 10:02:28 AM
"At some point, you realize that if this is what your customers want if your customers are dying, you need to deliver," she said.

FTFTFA
 
2012-09-29 10:02:53 AM
Anyone who argues that the market self-corrects is forgetting one very important factor.

In order for that to happen, you need an informed consumer base and such a thing only exists in theory.
 
2012-09-29 10:03:30 AM

MFAWG: I honestly cannot figure out why rental car companies would ignore recalls?


Probably because of the dollar loss on the downtime when the car is out of the fleet being repaired. Bean-counter killers strike again.
(I wish AOL employed better writers and editors because it's hard to take the story seriously when they refer to "steering wheel fluid." The only time "steering wheel fluid" caused a near-accident for me is when I spilled my beer and it got slippery.)
 
2012-09-29 10:04:32 AM

Whiskey Pete: cabbyman: So did the hose actually leak and cause the accident?

According to the article the steering wheel ran out of fluid.



No the article just says that the hose could leak. It doesn't say that it did or if that's what caused them to lose control. Unless I'm missing something...
 
2012-09-29 10:05:04 AM
[edward-norton-fight-club-quote-about-calculus-of-death.txt]
 
2012-09-29 10:05:38 AM
A corporation has one primary function: to increase shareholder value.
If the board and CEO lose focus they can be sued by the shareholders.
Any moral otherwise charitable action taken by a corporation is only allowable to the extent that building "good will" increases value.
The consumer advocates are effective by demonstrating that the profitable behavior creates "bad will" that reduces shareholder value.
 
2012-09-29 10:06:10 AM

MFAWG: I honestly cannot figure out why rental car companies would ignore recalls?


Because being safe costs money and lowers the profit that goes to the noble job creators. (obvious)

Those girls that died probably weren't rich, so it's ok. there is nothing Romney could have done to help them anyways.
 
2012-09-29 10:06:41 AM

MFAWG: I honestly cannot figure out why rental car companies would ignore recalls?


Having a recalled item fixed on a personal car means taking your car to the dealership and picking it up a couple of days later: minor inconvenience. I have no idea what the logistics of getting 1000 Corollas in a rental fleet recalled would mean. I'm sure it's a huge nightmare that involves losing lots of money which is exactly why they don't do unless forced to.
 
2012-09-29 10:06:54 AM

MFAWG: I honestly cannot figure out why rental car companies would ignore recalls?


i47.tinypic.com
 
2012-09-29 10:07:27 AM

WhoIsNotInMyKitchen: MFAWG: I honestly cannot figure out why rental car companies would ignore recalls?

Because being safe costs money and lowers the profit that goes to the noble job creators. (obvious)

Those girls that died probably weren't rich, so it's ok. there is nothing Romney could have done to help them anyways.


Recalls like that don't cost you money. I suppose it costs you time to take the car in but the company pays for the fix.
 
2012-09-29 10:07:46 AM
Not only is regulation needed, I'll go as far as to say CEOs should have to have White House Approval, before being named CEO
 
2012-09-29 10:08:42 AM
I love how leftists argue for regulation in the abstract, as if there wasn't good regulation, bad regulation, destructive regulation, and frequent purchase of the regulators by the regulated- something the D's have all had hands in.
The strawman that Right-wingers want anarchy as the alternative to their suffocating, all-encompassing state is equally amusing.

Anyway, too bad about the girls. If only someone had taught them to leave Chrysler products on the lot, they'd still be alive today.

Oh hey, KrimsonTyde, those democrats have to get the rental car companies 'on board' first because they want to look like they're fighting for the consumer, while still raking in those campaign contributions and ensuring they get sinecures for their friends, family, and themselves after they retire from the senate.
 
2012-09-29 10:08:59 AM
Take the number of vehicles in the field, (A), and multiply it by the probable rate of failure, (B), then multiply the result by the average out-of-court settlement, (C). A times B times C equals X.

3.bp.blogspot.com

Now, figure out the odds someone will experience this disaster while driving a U-Haul. The odds a poorly maintained, uninspected vehicle will result in blame coming to us is miniscuie, while maintaining the illusion that the vehicles are safe because "government will protect us". Yeah, government will step in the minute you start to mean something to them. Until then you are just a collection of numbers to be regulated and delegated.
 
2012-09-29 10:09:33 AM

cabbyman: Whiskey Pete: cabbyman: So did the hose actually leak and cause the accident?

According to the article the steering wheel ran out of fluid.


No the article just says that the hose could leak. It doesn't say that it did or if that's what caused them to lose control. Unless I'm missing something...


I was just pointing out the absurdity of the steering wheel fluid thing.
 
2012-09-29 10:10:15 AM
I'm no expert on commerce, the free market, capitalism, business, right wing ideology or government oversight, but wouldn't this:

Consumer pressure "made us reconsider our position," said Laura Bryant, communications director for Enterprise. "We thought federal regulation and oversight was not needed ... The consumers told us they would be more comfortable with greater oversight."

be a perfect example of the market self-correcting? The company made a decision, consumers responded and based on that response the company changed their policy.
 
2012-09-29 10:10:58 AM

cabbyman: Whiskey Pete: cabbyman: So did the hose actually leak and cause the accident?

According to the article the steering wheel ran out of fluid.


No the article just says that the hose could leak. It doesn't say that it did or if that's what caused them to lose control. Unless I'm missing something...


While you are correct, would it change anything if it did not cause the accident? Would you then be ok with letting rental car companies send people out on the roads with defective cars? Would even the mere potential for running out of steering fluid be any less dangerous? If not, then the law is still warranted and I am ok with any mis-attribution of cause.
 
2012-09-29 10:11:04 AM

cabbyman: WhoIsNotInMyKitchen: MFAWG: I honestly cannot figure out why rental car companies would ignore recalls?

Because being safe costs money and lowers the profit that goes to the noble job creators. (obvious)

Those girls that died probably weren't rich, so it's ok. there is nothing Romney could have done to help them anyways.

Recalls like that don't cost you money. I suppose it costs you time to take the car in but the company pays for the fix.


This. And they shuttle cars in and out of repair shops on a daily basis, so it makes absolutely no sense. Hell, get your in house techs certified and sign the repairs off that way.

Stupid, stupid, stupid.
 
2012-09-29 10:12:01 AM

dfenstrate: I love how leftists argue for regulation in the abstract, as if there wasn't good regulation, bad regulation, destructive regulation, and frequent purchase of the regulators by the regulated- something the D's have all had hands in.
The strawman that Right-wingers want anarchy as the alternative to their suffocating, all-encompassing state is equally amusing.

Anyway, too bad about the girls. If only someone had taught them to leave Chrysler products on the lot, they'd still be alive today.

Oh hey, KrimsonTyde, those democrats have to get the rental car companies 'on board' first because they want to look like they're fighting for the consumer, while still raking in those campaign contributions and ensuring they get sinecures for their friends, family, and themselves after they retire from the senate.


i1162.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-29 10:13:27 AM
Best government money can buy.
 
2012-09-29 10:14:08 AM

LouDobbsAwaaaay: MFAWG: I honestly cannot figure out why rental car companies would ignore recalls?

[i47.tinypic.com image 500x281]


I was thinking the same the same thing: "The Formula."

FTA: The rental companies had argued that they already have, in the past few years, put policies in place that keep recalled cars off the road. Rich Broome, senior vice president of communications at Hertz, said recalled cars are flagged in the computer system as recalled and are taken out of the pool of eligible rental cars. Any employee who rents a recalled car could be fired, he said.

Enterprise also has a similar practice in place, said Bryant, which led the company to believe it didn't need any oversight from the government to keep its customers safe.

"At some point, you realize that if this is what your customers want, you need to deliver," she said.


Common f*cking sense and human f*cking decency should have told you to do this a long time before taking a poll from your customers.
 
2012-09-29 10:14:28 AM

Snapper Carr: Anyone who argues that the market self-corrects is forgetting one very important factor.

In order for that to happen, you need an informed consumer base and such a thing only exists in theory.


It also assumes total transparency. If a company is lying or withholding information, it doesn't matter how informed a consumer is.
 
2012-09-29 10:15:12 AM
And I wonder how many Republicans voted against the bill.
 
2012-09-29 10:15:51 AM
 
2012-09-29 10:16:33 AM
o.aolcdn.com

The one making a duck face - it was only a matter of time. Bath Salts or Meth would have taken her anyway. The one on the right-that's a god damn farking shame.
 
2012-09-29 10:16:40 AM

insano: cabbyman: Whiskey Pete: cabbyman: So did the hose actually leak and cause the accident?

According to the article the steering wheel ran out of fluid.


No the article just says that the hose could leak. It doesn't say that it did or if that's what caused them to lose control. Unless I'm missing something...

While you are correct, would it change anything if it did not cause the accident? Would you then be ok with letting rental car companies send people out on the roads with defective cars? Would even the mere potential for running out of steering fluid be any less dangerous? If not, then the law is still warranted and I am ok with any mis-attribution of cause.


I'm not one who thinks wanton government regulation just for the sake of regulation is good.

That said, a little digging shows that it was found that this accident was cause by this problem. The hose leaked, the fluid caught fire, and the girls lost control. It cost Enterprise $15 million after they got sued:

http://www.alertdriving.com/home/fleet-alert-magazine/north-america/e n terprise-rent-car-admits-negligence-crash-killed-santa-cruz-sisters

"A jury has awarded $15 million to the parents who filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Enterprise Rent-A-Car of San Francisco after their daughters, Raechel and Jacqueline Houck of Santa Cruz, died in a fiery crash in 2004.

Enterprise, the nation's largest rental car company, and its corporate parent contested the lawsuit for five years, then admitted in May they were negligent and that "their negligence was the sole proximate cause of the fatal injuries," according to a document signed by their attorneys."
 
2012-09-29 10:17:10 AM

geek_mars: Consumer pressure "made us reconsider our position," said Laura Bryant, communications director for Enterprise. "We thought federal regulation and oversight was not needed ... The consumers told us they would be more comfortable with greater oversight."

be a perfect example of the market self-correcting? The company made a decision, consumers responded and based on that response the company changed their policy.


yeah, except for the whole people being dead part.

Safety shouldn't be voluntary for these companies. If they could be trusted, it wouldn't have happened to begin with.
 
2012-09-29 10:17:41 AM
www.stephenhicks.org
 
2012-09-29 10:17:58 AM

cabbyman: insano: cabbyman: Whiskey Pete: cabbyman: So did the hose actually leak and cause the accident?

According to the article the steering wheel ran out of fluid.


No the article just says that the hose could leak. It doesn't say that it did or if that's what caused them to lose control. Unless I'm missing something...

While you are correct, would it change anything if it did not cause the accident? Would you then be ok with letting rental car companies send people out on the roads with defective cars? Would even the mere potential for running out of steering fluid be any less dangerous? If not, then the law is still warranted and I am ok with any mis-attribution of cause.

I'm not one who thinks wanton government regulation just for the sake of regulation is good.

That said, a little digging shows that it was found that this accident was cause by this problem. The hose leaked, the fluid caught fire, and the girls lost control. It cost Enterprise $15 million after they got sued:

http://www.alertdriving.com/home/fleet-alert-magazine/north-america/e n terprise-rent-car-admits-negligence-crash-killed-santa-cruz-sisters

"A jury has awarded $15 million to the parents who filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Enterprise Rent-A-Car of San Francisco after their daughters, Raechel and Jacqueline Houck of Santa Cruz, died in a fiery crash in 2004.

Enterprise, the nation's largest rental car company, and its corporate parent contested the lawsuit for five years, then admitted in May they were negligent and that "their negligence was the sole proximate cause of the fatal injuries," according to a document signed by their attorneys."



Interestingly enough one of the girls worked at the rental place and rented the car to herself.
 
2012-09-29 10:18:59 AM
My mom, a fundie, believes in no regulation because the "everything has risks" and "you can't make everything safe."

The implication is that god looks out for believers so we don't need big government doing it too. I find it interesting how her ideology dovetails nicely with GOP orthodoxy, I doubt it is a coincidence.
 
2012-09-29 10:19:26 AM

cabbyman: Interestingly enough one of the girls worked at the rental place and rented the car to herself.


What does that have to do with anything? Are you implying that she was somehow aware of the recall?
 
2012-09-29 10:21:10 AM

cabbyman: I'm not one who thinks wanton government regulation just for the sake of regulation is good.


I don't think that we should consider potentially lethal shenanigans nobody's business until after people are dying.
 
2012-09-29 10:22:13 AM

LarryDan43: Krymson Tyde: FTA: It's taken two years for Sen. Barbara Boxer and Sen. Chuck Schumer to get the majority of the rental car industry on board.

Can someone more learned in the ways of government than I explain why there is a need to get companies "on board" before they can pass common sence legislation?

Need to get those board positions ready for the politicians that write the legislation.


Yup. The legislation will be some kind of toothless wonder, probably giving rental companies a time frame to get recalled vehicles fixed/out of production that is longer than the average useful lifespan of said car in the fleet. And then of course the rental companies will have to hire a bunch of "recall experts" who just so happen to be fresh off dealing with such issues in Washington.
 
2012-09-29 10:22:42 AM

sprawl15: cabbyman: I'm not one who thinks wanton government regulation just for the sake of regulation is good.

I don't think that we should consider potentially lethal shenanigans nobody's business until after people are dying.


Well I'm sure that sentiment can't possibly lead anywhere bad, can it?
 
2012-09-29 10:23:10 AM

Seabon: My mom, a fundie, believes in no regulation because the "everything has risks" and "you can't make everything safe."

The implication is that god looks out for believers so we don't need big government doing it too. I find it interesting how her ideology dovetails nicely with GOP orthodoxy, I doubt it is a coincidence.


So "the believer" who lost their savings and home due to the actions of Financial Service companies - Credit Default Swaps, CDOs, high debt to income ratios, repeal of Glass-Steagall etc. They didn't pray hard enough???? Got it.
 
2012-09-29 10:23:21 AM

cabbyman: Interestingly enough one of the girls worked at the rental place and rented the car to herself.


Do you think either one of them was a mechanic and did regular maintenance on the vehicles?
 
2012-09-29 10:24:24 AM

cabbyman: sprawl15: cabbyman: I'm not one who thinks wanton government regulation just for the sake of regulation is good.

I don't think that we should consider potentially lethal shenanigans nobody's business until after people are dying.

Well I'm sure that sentiment can't possibly lead anywhere bad, can it?


Nope.
 
2012-09-29 10:24:45 AM

cabbyman: sprawl15: cabbyman: I'm not one who thinks wanton government regulation just for the sake of regulation is good.

I don't think that we should consider potentially lethal shenanigans nobody's business until after people are dying.

Well I'm sure that sentiment can't possibly lead anywhere bad, can it?


Well sure. How else are we going to diminish the surplus population?
 
2012-09-29 10:25:44 AM

Snapper Carr: Anyone who argues that the market self-corrects is forgetting one very important factor.

In order for that to happen, you need an informed consumer base and such a thing only exists in theory.


In this case the market did self correct.. nobody fixed the law.

And subtard, nobody is asking for zero regulations.
 
2012-09-29 10:26:40 AM

Fart_Machine: cabbyman: Interestingly enough one of the girls worked at the rental place and rented the car to herself.

Do you think either one of them was a mechanic and did regular maintenance on the vehicles?


I don't know about you but every twenty-something year old female I've ever met was capable of interpreting automotive service bulletins that describe potential mechanical failures. This accident was clearly her fault.
 
2012-09-29 10:27:11 AM

Whiskey Pete: cabbyman: Interestingly enough one of the girls worked at the rental place and rented the car to herself.

What does that have to do with anything? Are you implying that she was somehow aware of the recall?


Nope. I just thought it was interesting although it isn't outside the realm of possibility to be honest:

"In a sworn declaration, Mark Matias, manager of Enterprise's Northern California area including Capitola from 1994 to 2004, said that before the accident, he was unaware the PT Cruiser was a recalled vehicle.

Furthermore, he said the Enterprise corporate philosophy was "you've got to keep booking, because you
don't know when you are going to get a car back. But then of course, you run short on vehicles, and if all you have are recalled vehicles on the lot, you rent them out. It was a given. The whole company did it."

His statement explained his understanding of the policy: If a priority recall appears on the computer screen in the rental office, the employee is required to write the word "recall" on a Post-it note and place it on the key in an area designated for non-rentals, but nothing prevents an employee from renting that vehicle."

My other link is fubar so I'm reposting it properly:

Link
 
2012-09-29 10:29:12 AM

sprawl15: cabbyman: sprawl15: cabbyman: I'm not one who thinks wanton government regulation just for the sake of regulation is good.

I don't think that we should consider potentially lethal shenanigans nobody's business until after people are dying.

Well I'm sure that sentiment can't possibly lead anywhere bad, can it?

Nope.


OK so lets start the list of potentially lethal activities that the government should outlaw in order to protect us:

Bungee jumping
Skydiving
rock climbing
hot air balloning
football
driving

Any others?
 
Displayed 50 of 292 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report