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(CBS News)   Crime lab chemist, whose work has been involved in the convictions of over 1,140 inmates, arrested for intentionally mishandling over 60,000 samples and falsifying results   (cbsnews.com) divider line 91
    More: Dumbass, Department of Public Health, Suffolk County, tainted evidence, convictions  
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4895 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Sep 2012 at 3:45 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-29 02:23:24 AM  
this is a huge deal, holy crap what a horrible person
 
2012-09-29 02:27:04 AM  
TFA
A lab employee saw Dookhan weighing drug samples without doing a balance check on her scale.


wait, what? a balance check? i assume they mean taring it.

surely they're not using one of these
images.wikia.com
 
2012-09-29 03:50:26 AM  
Surely she only did this to people who deserved to go away, right?
 
2012-09-29 03:53:54 AM  
And THIS is why you never do a breath test for a DWI/DUI. Or a blood test.
 
2012-09-29 03:54:04 AM  
How many lives were ruined by this stupid coont? She should be sentenced to a year for every year someone falsely convicted by her evidence served.

The two obstruction charges accuse Dookhan of lying about drug samples she analyzed at the lab in March 2011 for a Suffolk County case, and for testifying under oath in August 2010 that she had a master's degree in chemistry from the University of Massachusetts

How hard is this shiat to check???
 
2012-09-29 03:56:05 AM  
someone has a future in law enforcement. her skills are going to waste in a crime lab.
 
2012-09-29 03:58:24 AM  
The only motive authorities have found so far is that Dookhan wanted to be seen as a good worker, the state attorney general said.

She also said she forged the initials of colleagues and deliberately turned a negative sample into a positive for narcotics a few times.


Gotta keep that conviction rate high!
 
2012-09-29 04:02:22 AM  
Y'know there are a lot of jobs that need to be filled checking/auditing government funds, banks, businesses, charities, now crime labs. Perhaps we can wipe out our silly tax code and the stupid amount of time complying with that and turn people working on tax compliance towards these other jobs.
 
2012-09-29 04:03:01 AM  

Pathman: this is a huge deal, holy crap what a horrible person

 
2012-09-29 04:04:48 AM  
FTA: She also said she forged the initials of colleagues and deliberately turned a negative sample into a positive for narcotics a few times

Amongst plenty of other crap, she deliberately framed innocent people for drug-related crimes apparently just to look better to her bosses. I'm fairly sure you'd have to be a sociopath to even consider doing that.
 
2012-09-29 04:05:24 AM  
Law and order episode
 
2012-09-29 04:12:37 AM  
Gotta love how the article tried to mitigate her acts by speaking to her motivations. For this sorta stuff, no mitigation is possible. She willing assumed the mantle of authority.

//What is the verb form
//for "to tare?"
 
2012-09-29 04:12:57 AM  
Well, if the court doesn't get enough justice on her, chances are good she'll run in to one of the people she helped wrongly convict with the little jail time she does.
 
2012-09-29 04:22:18 AM  

Gunther: FTA: She also said she forged the initials of colleagues and deliberately turned a negative sample into a positive for narcotics a few times

Amongst plenty of other crap, she deliberately framed innocent people for drug-related crimes apparently just to look better to her bosses. I'm fairly sure you'd have to be a sociopath to even consider doing that.


Sounds like a hero to Sheriff Joe Arpaio.
 
2012-09-29 04:37:49 AM  
The state could just do the right thing here. Release everyone that was in any way affected by the lab she worked. Expunge their records of the conviction, trial and the initial charges. Any and all of these things make people unemployable. Just imagine all the payouts due to lost time, wrongful imprisonment, irreparable damage to family relations, mental anguish, loss of marital privilege etc. adnausium.



Yeah, that could do that. I could win the lottery. Pretty sure neither is going to happen.
 
2012-09-29 04:49:11 AM  
And this is just what we have found out. Too many people in various positions of authority are getting away with something. Who knows how severe or mild it is. But the amount of unquestioned power held by authorities is already out of balance.
 
2012-09-29 04:51:00 AM  

simon_bar_sinister: The state could just do the right thing here. Release everyone that was in any way affected by the lab she worked. Expunge their records of the conviction, trial and the initial charges. Any and all of these things make people unemployable. Just imagine all the payouts due to lost time, wrongful imprisonment, irreparable damage to family relations, mental anguish, loss of marital privilege etc. adnausium.



Yeah, that could do that. I could win the lottery. Pretty sure neither is going to happen.


I just want to reinforce what you said. It's not just the cases that she worked on. She had unsupervised access to the evidence locker. No one knows what she did in there. Every farking case involving evidence that was tested by that lab, the entire lab, is in doubt. This is a huge farking deal. And I agree, I doubt the state is going to throw out all of those cases.
 
2012-09-29 04:52:32 AM  

simon_bar_sinister: The state could just do the right thing here. Release everyone that was in any way affected by the lab she worked. Expunge their records of the conviction, trial and the initial charges. Any and all of these things make people unemployable. Just imagine all the payouts due to lost time, wrongful imprisonment, irreparable damage to family relations, mental anguish, loss of marital privilege etc. adnausium.



Yeah, that could do that. I could win the lottery. Pretty sure neither is going to happen.


Yeah right.
Her supervisors should be in trouble as well.
 
2012-09-29 04:57:39 AM  

rwfan: simon_bar_sinister: The state could just do the right thing here. Release everyone that was in any way affected by the lab she worked. Expunge their records of the conviction, trial and the initial charges. Any and all of these things make people unemployable. Just imagine all the payouts due to lost time, wrongful imprisonment, irreparable damage to family relations, mental anguish, loss of marital privilege etc. adnausium.



Yeah, that could do that. I could win the lottery. Pretty sure neither is going to happen.

I just want to reinforce what you said. It's not just the cases that she worked on. She had unsupervised access to the evidence locker. No one knows what she did in there. Every farking case involving evidence that was tested by that lab, the entire lab, is in doubt. This is a huge farking deal. And I agree, I doubt the state is going to throw out all of those cases.


I read an article about this that says that they've already released a few dozen and that a few hundred more have lawyers. Pretty much every defense lawyer in the area is on this. They smell blood in the water.
 
2012-09-29 04:58:34 AM  
"I screwed up big-time," she is quoted as saying in a state police report. "I messed up bad; it's my fault. I don't want the lab to get in trouble."

Oh, the LAB???

Howabout any one whose life you screwed up with your "big-time screwup"? Howabout all the cases the prosecutor is going to have to retry, and all the potential criminals who walked free because your "personal problems" and "desire to look good" may have caused the wrong person to go to jail while the real one is still out there?

But oh, no, she's just worried about the lab looking bad. Talk about f*cked priorities.
 
2012-09-29 05:04:00 AM  

thatboyoverthere: rwfan: simon_bar_sinister: The state could just do the right thing here. Release everyone that was in any way affected by the lab she worked. Expunge their records of the conviction, trial and the initial charges. Any and all of these things make people unemployable. Just imagine all the payouts due to lost time, wrongful imprisonment, irreparable damage to family relations, mental anguish, loss of marital privilege etc. adnausium.



Yeah, that could do that. I could win the lottery. Pretty sure neither is going to happen.

I just want to reinforce what you said. It's not just the cases that she worked on. She had unsupervised access to the evidence locker. No one knows what she did in there. Every farking case involving evidence that was tested by that lab, the entire lab, is in doubt. This is a huge farking deal. And I agree, I doubt the state is going to throw out all of those cases.

I read an article about this that says that they've already released a few dozen and that a few hundred more have lawyers. Pretty much every defense lawyer in the area is on this. They smell blood in the water.


I wonder what this is going to cost? I suspect it's going to make the big dig fiasco look like chump change.
 
2012-09-29 05:04:07 AM  
The part they left out was were the DA told her to do it.
 
2012-09-29 05:05:59 AM  

Gyrfalcon: "I screwed up big-time," she is quoted as saying in a state police report. "I messed up bad; it's my fault. I don't want the lab to get in trouble."

Oh, the LAB???

Howabout any one whose life you screwed up with your "big-time screwup"? Howabout all the cases the prosecutor is going to have to retry, and all the potential criminals who walked free because your "personal problems" and "desire to look good" may have caused the wrong person to go to jail while the real one is still out there?

But oh, no, she's just worried about the lab looking bad. Talk about f*cked priorities.


I'm sure there's more to the story than we are getting here. if she had unlimited access to the lockers she most likely has a habit of her own.
Every single case she was involved with should be brought up again.
 
2012-09-29 05:28:02 AM  

thatboyoverthere: rwfan: simon_bar_sinister: The state could just do the right thing here. Release everyone that was in any way affected by the lab she worked. Expunge their records of the conviction, trial and the initial charges. Any and all of these things make people unemployable. Just imagine all the payouts due to lost time, wrongful imprisonment, irreparable damage to family relations, mental anguish, loss of marital privilege etc. adnausium.



Yeah, that could do that. I could win the lottery. Pretty sure neither is going to happen.

I just want to reinforce what you said. It's not just the cases that she worked on. She had unsupervised access to the evidence locker. No one knows what she did in there. Every farking case involving evidence that was tested by that lab, the entire lab, is in doubt. This is a huge farking deal. And I agree, I doubt the state is going to throw out all of those cases.

I read an article about this that says that they've already released a few dozen and that a few hundred more have lawyers. Pretty much every defense lawyer in the area is on this. They smell blood in the water.


I'm pretty sure that unless the state has other overwhelming evidence of guilt, every conviction that hinged on evidence that she processed will be quietly overturned and the people will be released and probably get a small amount of money as long as they agree not to sue the state. If they don't sign away their right to sue the state for this, the state will fight tooth and nail for a new trial and fight for a conviction.

Stuff like this is real scary because it shows how easy it is for a person with any kind of agenda to get into a crime lab and start influencing convictions.
 
2012-09-29 05:35:59 AM  
Perhaps they could also prosecute her bosses too.

Uhh, she executed 500 tests a month,
versus everyone elses 50 to 150...

They've ignored it for some time.
 
2012-09-29 05:42:53 AM  
i280.photobucket.com

Do not play cards with this girl
 
2012-09-29 05:43:05 AM  

rogue49: Perhaps they could also prosecute her bosses too.

Uhh, she executed 500 tests a month,
versus everyone elses 50 to 150...

They've ignored it for some time.


Seriously, they didn't see a problem here? I'm routinely top performer of my team, but if I start doing 30%+ more than the second best my boss comes to me asking questions...
 
2012-09-29 05:53:33 AM  

Hardy-r-r: [i280.photobucket.com image 226x223]

Do not play cards with this girl


schnikies....

one of them eyes might be drawn on.
 
2012-09-29 06:03:44 AM  

rogue49: Perhaps they could also prosecute her bosses too.

Uhh, she executed 500 tests a month,
versus everyone elses 50 to 150...

They've ignored it for some time.


High performers make money and look good on paper.
 
2012-09-29 06:32:22 AM  

ongbok: thatboyoverthere: rwfan: simon_bar_sinister: The state could just do the right thing here. Release everyone that was in any way affected by the lab she worked. Expunge their records of the conviction, trial and the initial charges. Any and all of these things make people unemployable. Just imagine all the payouts due to lost time, wrongful imprisonment, irreparable damage to family relations, mental anguish, loss of marital privilege etc. adnausium.



Yeah, that could do that. I could win the lottery. Pretty sure neither is going to happen.

I just want to reinforce what you said. It's not just the cases that she worked on. She had unsupervised access to the evidence locker. No one knows what she did in there. Every farking case involving evidence that was tested by that lab, the entire lab, is in doubt. This is a huge farking deal. And I agree, I doubt the state is going to throw out all of those cases.

I read an article about this that says that they've already released a few dozen and that a few hundred more have lawyers. Pretty much every defense lawyer in the area is on this. They smell blood in the water.

I'm pretty sure that unless the state has other overwhelming evidence of guilt, every conviction that hinged on evidence that she processed will be quietly overturned and the people will be released and probably get a small amount of money as long as they agree not to sue the state. If they don't sign away their right to sue the state for this, the state will fight tooth and nail for a new trial and fight for a conviction.


I bet you are correct. mass actually has a statute that allows innocent victims to sue the state for of up to $500,000 for damages from a wrongful conviction. I know in texas the state is required to offered compensation in some cases, but that a lawsuit by the victim isn't the mechanism that has to get it rolling. In many sates sovereign immunity will be a bar unless you can state a federal (constitutional) claim.
also this biatch actually deserves the electric chair.
 
2012-09-29 06:32:30 AM  

fusillade762: How hard is this shiat to check???


This gets kinda fun. Ok, so a while ago many schools realized that answering questions about degrees was just a cost for them. This is where the "National School Clearinghouse" comes in. Now, the schools will refuse to answer simple questions like "did this person get X degree at your school?" and redirect you there. The NSC will charge you a fee and give part of that to the school. Sounds fine, right? Now put this in light of a stingy market where cutting costs has become the hallmark of good business. Put yourself in the shoes of an HR person who's supposed to verify this. Do you spend the money to check the educational background or do you figure that it's so unlikely that it's not worth the cost? You wouldn't want to look like the person wasting money in this economy, right? So what happens? The unemployed are more willing than ever to lie on their resumes and at the same time that HR doesn't want to spend money on verification. This may not have happened in this case, but it's happening.
 
2012-09-29 06:39:48 AM  
Do these labs really not check up on people's work? o_O

I'm sure this will do wonders for people's trust of law enforcement and the MA. court system. The stupid woman likely helped put innocent people behind bars, not to mention, the lawsuits over 1,100+ bad prosecutions could come close to bankrupting the state. I hope they throw the book at her. No sympathy for this idiot, None.
 
2012-09-29 06:46:06 AM  

AbbeySomeone: rogue49: Perhaps they could also prosecute her bosses too.

Uhh, she executed 500 tests a month,
versus everyone elses 50 to 150...

They've ignored it for some time.

High performers make money and look good on paper.


^^^

Im also wondering why she developed a lazy eye late in life.
I thought that was a sign of neurological disorders.

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-09-29 06:49:09 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: Law and order episode


Between Law and Order and The Simpsons, every topic ever has been covered.
 
2012-09-29 06:49:45 AM  

rwfan: I wonder what this is going to cost? I suspect it's going to make the big dig fiasco look like chump change.


Some googling doens't give an easy answer, but it looks like criminal trials cost taxpayers between $100k and $10M. TFA says 34,000 cases which gives a range of (34k times $100k to $10M) $3.4 billion to $340 billion.

As an estimate, say they average $500k. (Again, these are criminal trials, not small claims or anything.) Say only half of the 34,000 cases get retried. That's $17 billion. Multiply x2 to get the defense costs as well, for the total cost to society. And that doesn't even count any damages awarded.
 
2012-09-29 06:52:58 AM  

Summoner101: Well, if the court doesn't get enough justice on her, chances are good she'll run in to one of the people she helped wrongly convict with the little jail time she does.


i doubt that - i'd say most of the people he helped convict, wrongly or otherwise, aren't going to be running into her anytime soon...they'll have to wait until she joins them on the outside.
 
2012-09-29 06:55:24 AM  
Having dealt with a liar and cheat in a laboratory, the warning signs are often there in advance, so if this went on for years the management may bear a lot of blame.
 
2012-09-29 06:56:09 AM  

signaljammer: Gotta love how the article tried to mitigate her acts by speaking to her motivations. For this sorta stuff, no mitigation is possible. She willing assumed the mantle of authority.

//What is the verb form
//for "to tare?"


to tare
 
2012-09-29 06:56:51 AM  

Animatronik: Having dealt with a liar and cheat in a laboratory, the warning signs are often there in advance, so if this went on for years the management may bear a lot of blame.


exactly - positive data!
seriously.
 
2012-09-29 06:57:19 AM  
I doubt most of the cases get retried, if they were non-violent drug offenses. The evidence for those would have been destroyed. But I do believe everyone is going to do their best to make a buck off this, and the trial lawyers are undoubtedly rubbing their palms together in glee, over this potential windfall.
 
2012-09-29 07:15:51 AM  

Wodan11: rwfan: I wonder what this is going to cost? I suspect it's going to make the big dig fiasco look like chump change.

Some googling doens't give an easy answer, but it looks like criminal trials cost taxpayers between $100k and $10M. TFA says 34,000 cases which gives a range of (34k times $100k to $10M) $3.4 billion to $340 billion.

As an estimate, say they average $500k. (Again, these are criminal trials, not small claims or anything.) Say only half of the 34,000 cases get retried. That's $17 billion. Multiply x2 to get the defense costs as well, for the total cost to society. And that doesn't even count any damages awarded.


you may be doing cop math.
it doesn't cost the state 500k to try a criminal possession case. it doesn't even cost 100k. assistant district attorneys might make what, 82k a year?.
the courthouse is paid for. the court costs are mostly fixed costs. if you have to hire an additional prosecutor for $82k a year who works 2800 hours a year (that's 58 hours a week for 48 weeks a year) and she spends 95 hours on each case including trial time that's $2951.78 per case. there isn't too much to these cases. "I'm a cop and I found this bag of coke on him after I stopped him for rolling through a stop sign and searched him after he acted figidity, I put it in evidence. I'm a crime lab technician and this is the bag of white powder from evidence and tested it and it tested positive as cocaine. guilty."
there is some cop overtime but if it cost as much as you think to prosecute it wouldn't happen nearly as often. anyway, the chain of custody is pretty much f*cked, and without actual physical evidence of possession so are the states chances in a lot of these. the vast majority of these are not even thinking about getting retried I bet.
 
2012-09-29 07:23:49 AM  

Animatronik: Having dealt with a liar and cheat in a laboratory, the warning signs are often there in advance, so if this went on for years the management may bear a lot of blame.


Amen. I don't work in a lab, but fakers get caught eventually. What management does at that point determines who is punished. This girl and every single person that she reports to and above needs to be held responsible. Especially since some of the reports of oddities go back years.

I wonder if something in her past, say parental or societal expectations to conform or excel, had any part in this. It took years for me to stop giving a crap what my parents or society thought of my life, and I'm just a yahoo from a small town. From what I've ready about Asian cultures, she may have been brainwashed to over achieve and please to off-set her unworthiness as a female. Still, turn everyone loose that she had anything to do with convicting, and put the blame back on the stupid War on Drugs, where it belongs.
 
2012-09-29 07:25:41 AM  
A minor thing, but by falsely claiming a Masters, she was probably getting paid more than she should have.
 
2012-09-29 07:34:49 AM  

cherryl taggart: Animatronik: Having dealt with a liar and cheat in a laboratory, the warning signs are often there in advance, so if this went on for years the management may bear a lot of blame.

Amen. I don't work in a lab, but fakers get caught eventually. What management does at that point determines who is punished. This girl and every single person that she reports to and above needs to be held responsible. Especially since some of the reports of oddities go back years.

I wonder if something in her past, say parental or societal expectations to conform or excel, had any part in this. It took years for me to stop giving a crap what my parents or society thought of my life, and I'm just a yahoo from a small town. From what I've ready about Asian cultures, she may have been brainwashed to over achieve and please to off-set her unworthiness as a female. Still, turn everyone loose that she had anything to do with convicting, and put the blame back on the stupid War on Drugs, where it belongs.


I'm not sure if her behavior was a desire to achieve or malicious intent.
 
2012-09-29 07:39:57 AM  
It's sad because I thought of 3 names off the top of my head that should be arrested for this, and she wasn't even one of them.

// Actually 2 coroners and full time expert witness, but same basic idea.
 
2012-09-29 07:50:37 AM  
I don't see the big deal. She's not a tarer.
 
2012-09-29 07:59:36 AM  
I'd do her.
 
2012-09-29 08:04:07 AM  

Tanthalas39: I'd do her.


Just falsify your post and say you already did.
 
2012-09-29 08:09:06 AM  

simon_bar_sinister: The state could just do the right thing here. Release everyone that was in any way affected by the lab she worked.


You should give this a bit more thought. Cutting everyone loose is crass. What they need to do is compile a list of cases where the lab work was instrumental in the conviction.

"Well, we had 3 eye witnesses who saw the guy shoot and kill the victim. We have video of the shooting. The suspect was apprehended with the murder weapon on his person. He spontaneously confessed and backed it up with a written confession. But his lab work was tainted, so free he goes!"
 
2012-09-29 08:22:15 AM  

relcec: Wodan11: rwfan: I wonder what this is going to cost? I suspect it's going to make the big dig fiasco look like chump change.

Some googling doens't give an easy answer, but it looks like criminal trials cost taxpayers between $100k and $10M. TFA says 34,000 cases which gives a range of (34k times $100k to $10M) $3.4 billion to $340 billion.

As an estimate, say they average $500k. (Again, these are criminal trials, not small claims or anything.) Say only half of the 34,000 cases get retried. That's $17 billion. Multiply x2 to get the defense costs as well, for the total cost to society. And that doesn't even count any damages awarded.

you may be doing cop math.
it doesn't cost the state 500k to try a criminal possession case. it doesn't even cost 100k. assistant district attorneys might make what, 82k a year?.
the courthouse is paid for. the court costs are mostly fixed costs. if you have to hire an additional prosecutor for $82k a year who works 2800 hours a year (that's 58 hours a week for 48 weeks a year) and she spends 95 hours on each case including trial time that's $2951.78 per case. there isn't too much to these cases. "I'm a cop and I found this bag of coke on him after I stopped him for rolling through a stop sign and searched him after he acted figidity, I put it in evidence. I'm a crime lab technician and this is the bag of white powder from evidence and tested it and it tested positive as cocaine. guilty."
there is some cop overtime but if it cost as much as you think to prosecute it wouldn't happen nearly as often. anyway, the chain of custody is pretty much f*cked, and without actual physical evidence of possession so are the states chances in a lot of these. the vast majority of these are not even thinking about getting retried I bet.


If the libtards would just let us give all these criminals the chair we wouldn't have to worry about retrials or lawsuits or math.
 
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