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(KSDK St. Louis)   During the Cold War, the US Army began covert tests on residents of the city of St. Louis: "The study was secretive for reason. They didn't have volunteers stepping up and saying yeah, I'll breathe zinc cadmium sulfide with radioactive particles"   (ksdk.com) divider line 21
    More: Scary, US Army, Cold War, hot particle, St. Louis, Knights of Columbus, radioactive contamination  
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7865 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Sep 2012 at 10:04 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-09-28 10:26:07 PM  
4 votes:
Don't worry, military testing on civilians was something they used to do a long time ago. They'd never do that now. Nope. No way.
2012-09-29 02:32:16 AM  
3 votes:
But they would never fly planes into buildings and claim it was someone else, nu-uh.
2012-09-28 10:41:10 PM  
3 votes:
I think we should give the Government more money, more power, and more control. They seem like a trustworthy bunch.
2012-09-28 10:08:36 PM  
3 votes:
No one better ever tell me again that I'm too paranoid.
2012-09-29 11:02:57 AM  
2 votes:

Isildur: Oh, FFS. Zinc cadmium sulfide IS the florescent substance.
And this isn't newly revealed. This was extensively reviewed back in 1997. She seems to have added nothing new except vague insinuations about some sort of connection to U.S. Radium.

The Army was not looking to test the effects on residents, they were looking to test dispersion rates and characteristics. They used ZnCdS and in some cases even some actual (but not considered harmful) species of microbes as tracers to estimate what the dispersion of attacks on the cities would be, if an actual bioweapon was used by the Soviets.

Were the tests unethical? Absolutely. By testing in inhabited areas, people were exposed without knowledge or consent to substances that, although thought safe, were not thoroughly enough proven to be so.
Were people being deliberately experimented upon in this case? No.

/For that, you can check out the Tuskegee syphilis experiment
//As for U.S. Radium, they were forced to stop making Undark (and stopped processing ore for radium) already by the late '20s. Undark's inventor himself died of exposure to the radium.


Oh, thank you, sir. You got here first. /bow
2012-09-29 11:01:29 AM  
2 votes:
Oh gotdamn it.

There are no radioactive particles in zinc cadmium sulfide. It glows because it's fluorescent. It was a test on where radioactive and biochemical particles would spread, but you don't need radioactivity to test wind patterns.
2012-09-29 01:43:18 AM  
2 votes:
Oh, FFS. Zinc cadmium sulfide IS the florescent substance.
And this isn't newly revealed. This was extensively reviewed back in 1997. She seems to have added nothing new except vague insinuations about some sort of connection to U.S. Radium.

The Army was not looking to test the effects on residents, they were looking to test dispersion rates and characteristics. They used ZnCdS and in some cases even some actual (but not considered harmful) species of microbes as tracers to estimate what the dispersion of attacks on the cities would be, if an actual bioweapon was used by the Soviets.

Were the tests unethical? Absolutely. By testing in inhabited areas, people were exposed without knowledge or consent to substances that, although thought safe, were not thoroughly enough proven to be so.
Were people being deliberately experimented upon in this case? No.

/For that, you can check out the Tuskegee syphilis experiment
//As for U.S. Radium, they were forced to stop making Undark (and stopped processing ore for radium) already by the late '20s. Undark's inventor himself died of exposure to the radium.
2012-09-29 05:25:42 PM  
1 votes:

Proximuscentauri: You are all SUPPOSED TO CARE about things like this. Radioactive particles or not, tests were done on citizens without their knowledge or consent.
Think it doesn't happen anymore? You are a farking idiot.

Do NOT go back to sleep.
DO SOMETHING.
Too much of a pussy? At least SPREAD AWARENESS.


The important thing is to not lie about what the government does. Was this unethical and immoral? Certainly. Was it dangerous, did it use radioactive particles, was it a test on American citizens? All no.

The more one lies about bad things, the most people will disbelieve new claims of bad things.
2012-09-29 12:24:23 PM  
1 votes:
You are all SUPPOSED TO CARE about things like this. Radioactive particles or not, tests were done on citizens without their knowledge or consent.
Think it doesn't happen anymore? You are a farking idiot.

Do NOT go back to sleep.
DO SOMETHING.
Too much of a pussy? At least SPREAD AWARENESS.
2012-09-29 08:15:45 AM  
1 votes:
Take all the Imos you want. Ick.
2012-09-29 07:27:38 AM  
1 votes:
chivethebrigade.files.wordpress.com 

tastes like chicken
2012-09-29 06:11:09 AM  
1 votes:
The military used to shoot off nukes in orbit to see what would happen. Absolute power over us.
2012-09-29 12:10:28 AM  
1 votes:
photos1.blogger.com

Meh,
2012-09-28 11:45:43 PM  
1 votes:
How do we know they aren't testing crap on us now?

Maybe an odorless, tasteless chemical causes obesity, diabetes, and slowly reduces intelligence that is being introduced into the food supply to allow the Mushroom People to process humanity into cans of cream soup that go unused in the back of their pantries for decades.
2012-09-28 11:21:01 PM  
1 votes:

skandalus: Voiceofreason01: Well that explains a lot

Lived in St. Louis for 8 years. After escaping this past April, all I can say is "pretty much."


Yeah, but you moved to MS (but in all fairness, it's where you're from).

But yeah, suburban St. Louis pretty much is the vinyl-sided circle of hell.
2012-09-28 10:18:59 PM  
1 votes:
imageshack.us
2012-09-28 10:12:15 PM  
1 votes:
So.... the chemtrail folks AREN'T batshiat crazy?

/damn
2012-09-28 09:39:00 PM  
1 votes:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Voiceofreason01: Well that explains a lot

Budweiser, for example


And Cardinals fans.
2012-09-28 09:28:39 PM  
1 votes:
Meh, being a big Cold War history fan, I knew of this in the early '90s. There were several tests, like this, done to see how radiation would spread around after a nuclear attack.

And if anyone likes Cold War pop culture, then CONELRAD is for you.
2012-09-28 08:52:26 PM  
1 votes:
Done in one.
2012-09-28 05:35:02 PM  
1 votes:

Voiceofreason01: Well that explains a lot


Budweiser, for example
 
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