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(RedOrbit)   Magic underwear detergent to save the planet from pollution. This is bad news for.... nitrogen oxides   (redorbit.com) divider line 25
    More: Cool, detergents, air pollution, nitrogen oxides, exhaust gas, pollution, Physical Sciences Research Council, University of Sheffield, respiratory diseases  
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1607 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Sep 2012 at 12:02 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-28 11:15:23 AM
There's only one real underwear detergent:

8.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-09-28 11:40:40 AM
Is that what the Mormon's use?
 
2012-09-28 12:12:36 PM
A catalytic "field of jeans" is on display at the Manchester Science Festival from October 27 - November 4, 2012.

As someone who's done work in both nanophotochemistry and catalysis (although not catalytic nanophotochemistry), I thought it was cool until I got to this pun.

Now I want to hurt someone.
 
2012-09-28 12:13:37 PM
why not just put it in all detergent if it's so cheap and so good at it's job?

if their claims are accurate we could nearly eliminate air pollution in a few years time.
 
2012-09-28 12:19:26 PM
I thought it was a comment about mittens cleaning up his act...
 
2012-09-28 12:23:40 PM
FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.

If this actually uses nanoparticles (like, actual ACTUAL nanoparticles, and not "This thing is several microns in size, but we're calling it a nanoparticle" (which... well, many companies like to do), then NO! BAD COMPANY. BAD. *Thwacks with stick*.

Sorry. Just, Nanomaterials currently aren't heavily regulated, if I recall correctly (they're a 'structure', not a chemicals), and so I don't exactly trust companies to use proper safety standards. I recall a few years ago there was a breathless media report about how carbon fibers were as dangerous for the lungs as asbestos (if they're unbound and allowed to float in the air). The scientists working with them weren't exactly concerned, since.. well, they'd assumed that *anyway*, and treated it as such.

But without any regulation, I somehow doubt all companies are being as careful?

Let alone the fact that a lot of nanoparticles are small enough to diffuse into cells, and there's still not a whole lot of knowledge on whether or not they'd screw up protein synthesis (acting as a catalyst, etc). To be fair, a lot of them *do* appear to be benign (The MSDS on colloidal gold nanoparticles is almost literally "Okay, we haven't found shiat, alright?! If we injected them with this much SALINE, they'd be dead. It doesn't seem to DO anything! But that means we don't *know* how safe it is, so just be super-careful, aright?" )

Now, to be fair, these may be completely safe, and perhaps they did safety-test them (I missed anything saying they'd gone through testing? I'll just hope they have).

Sorry, as someone who *works* with nanoparticles and nanotech, I suppose I have a visceral reaction when I see "Stuff! NOW WITH NANOPARTICLES." The thought of people misusing the tech/using it before all the safety issues are worked out just... makes me a bit twitchy at times. I guess part of it's a fear of some farkstick completely screwing things up and hurting a lot of people, and thus causing the public to treat nanotech the way it treats nuclear science.

/Which would suck, because this field is AWESOME.
//We are just on the cusp of being able to do some really, really neat things. Especially once we can do bottom-up assembly with less disorder...
 
2012-09-28 12:31:17 PM
Yeah. Sounds great but I have visions of a few years down the line when we suddenly realize that a) these particles cause malignant butt cancer, b) they're everywhere since we put them in every single brand of detergent and c) they take a billion years longer than plastic does to break down in the wild.

Woops.
 
2012-09-28 12:33:39 PM
I'm not so sure I want to become a walking air filter.
 
2012-09-28 12:35:09 PM
Now I'm really getting into this apocolyptic vision. Imagine the president breaking into American Idol season 72 to tell everyone that they have to take off all of their clothes, put on plastic bags and immediately hop a plane to Africa because the first world will be uninhabitable for the next billion years due to high concentrations of malignant butt-cancer particles.
 
2012-09-28 12:43:03 PM
Just put them in your freezer next to your hipster jeans.
 
2012-09-28 01:07:13 PM
the article claims that titanium dioxide is completely safe, yet there are studies pointing to it being a possible carcinogen. The IARC lists it as a Group 2B

titanium dioxide nanoparticles have been linked to inflammatory response and genetic damage in mice. carcinogen.
 
2012-09-28 01:08:24 PM
hrm, c-n-p went wonky there.
 
2012-09-28 01:14:04 PM

cannotsuggestaname: the article claims that titanium dioxide is completely safe, yet there are studies pointing to it being a possible carcinogen. The IARC lists it as a Group 2B

titanium dioxide nanoparticles have been linked to inflammatory response and genetic damage in mice. carcinogen.


Interesting. Titanium dioxide is an ingredient in nearly all cosmetics.
 
2012-09-28 01:17:56 PM

tarnok: Yeah. Sounds great but I have visions of a few years down the line when we suddenly realize that a) these particles cause malignant butt cancer, b) they're everywhere since we put them in every single brand of detergent and c) they take a billion years longer than plastic does to break down in the wild.

Woops.


Well, the *good* news about nanoparticles in a solution (to an extent) is that they are inherently unstable. That is, they do not *want* to stay a solution of nanoparticles: They want to coagulate. There are a variety of ways to explain this (bulk matter has lower energy than nanoparticles, etc), but when you think about it, it makes sense: if things did not trend towards bulk matter, why would there be anything *but* nanoparticles?

Thus, you have to stabilize them so that they don't immediately aggregate and fall out of a solution. Generally, this is done with either a charged coating (thus the nanoparticles repel each other), or a steric barrier (think coating something in teflon). Both will eventually break down in time, and both can be attacked in a variety of ways to make the nanoparticles clump out of solution/water supply (alter the pH, add certain solvents, etc.)

Assuming these even have a steric coating? Since they're not *intended*, necessarily, for.. no, wait, they're in the detergent, so yeah, they've gotta have some sort of coating. Hrm.
 
2012-09-28 01:25:26 PM

Tergiversada: cannotsuggestaname: the article claims that titanium dioxide is completely safe, yet there are studies pointing to it being a possible carcinogen. The IARC lists it as a Group 2B

titanium dioxide nanoparticles have been linked to inflammatory response and genetic damage in mice. carcinogen.

Interesting. Titanium dioxide is an ingredient in nearly all cosmetics.


it is also used in almost all sunscreens that have a blocker in them, and it is also the reason there was a big kerfluffle about sunscreens a couple of years ago. If you go to the store now you will see several brands that loudly proclaim they are titanium dioxide free.
 
2012-09-28 02:04:34 PM

cannotsuggestaname: Tergiversada: cannotsuggestaname: the article claims that titanium dioxide is completely safe, yet there are studies pointing to it being a possible carcinogen. The IARC lists it as a Group 2B

titanium dioxide nanoparticles have been linked to inflammatory response and genetic damage in mice. carcinogen.

Interesting. Titanium dioxide is an ingredient in nearly all cosmetics.

it is also used in almost all sunscreens that have a blocker in them, and it is also the reason there was a big kerfluffle about sunscreens a couple of years ago. If you go to the store now you will see several brands that loudly proclaim they are titanium dioxide free.


TiO2 photogenerates radicals from organic molecules that come in contact with it - like the organic component of the sunscreen. So the thing that's supposed to screen you from skin cancer gives you skin cancer.

If you take out the TiO2 and encapsulate the organic molecules in zeolites, the danger goes way down.
 
2012-09-28 02:07:09 PM
dtdstudios.com
 
2012-09-28 02:23:24 PM

Bondith: cannotsuggestaname: Tergiversada: cannotsuggestaname: the article claims that titanium dioxide is completely safe, yet there are studies pointing to it being a possible carcinogen. The IARC lists it as a Group 2B

titanium dioxide nanoparticles have been linked to inflammatory response and genetic damage in mice. carcinogen.

Interesting. Titanium dioxide is an ingredient in nearly all cosmetics.

it is also used in almost all sunscreens that have a blocker in them, and it is also the reason there was a big kerfluffle about sunscreens a couple of years ago. If you go to the store now you will see several brands that loudly proclaim they are titanium dioxide free.

TiO2 photogenerates radicals from organic molecules that come in contact with it - like the organic component of the sunscreen. So the thing that's supposed to screen you from skin cancer gives you skin cancer.

If you take out the TiO2 and encapsulate the organic molecules in zeolites, the danger goes way down.

Ah, normal TiO2 causes the problem?

... Hnn, I imagine nano TiO2 particles would be... bad. Since they could diffuse into cells and deliver the free radicals *there*...
 
2012-09-28 02:54:01 PM

Felgraf: Bondith: cannotsuggestaname: Tergiversada: cannotsuggestaname: the article claims that titanium dioxide is completely safe, yet there are studies pointing to it being a possible carcinogen. The IARC lists it as a Group 2B

titanium dioxide nanoparticles have been linked to inflammatory response and genetic damage in mice. carcinogen.

Interesting. Titanium dioxide is an ingredient in nearly all cosmetics.

it is also used in almost all sunscreens that have a blocker in them, and it is also the reason there was a big kerfluffle about sunscreens a couple of years ago. If you go to the store now you will see several brands that loudly proclaim they are titanium dioxide free.

TiO2 photogenerates radicals from organic molecules that come in contact with it - like the organic component of the sunscreen. So the thing that's supposed to screen you from skin cancer gives you skin cancer.

If you take out the TiO2 and encapsulate the organic molecules in zeolites, the danger goes way down.
Ah, normal TiO2 causes the problem?

... Hnn, I imagine nano TiO2 particles would be... bad. Since they could diffuse into cells and deliver the free radicals *there*...


It's a photochemical process, so TiO2 in the depths of your lungs wouldn't be so bad. Skin cells, however...

I can't remember offhand where TiO2's absorption band is, or if it can do two-photon absorption using the red light that comes through the biological window. Someone in my M.Sc. group did her PhD on zeolite-encapsulated sunscreens. A bunch of us went waterskiing with my boss's former postdoc supervisor. I grabbed the sunscreen bottle to make sure there was no TiO2, and our host said to my boss "Only in your group do people do that."
 
2012-09-28 02:58:20 PM

DammitIForgotMyLogin: Is that what the Mormon's use?


*shakes fist*
 
2012-09-28 09:46:17 PM
but what about zinc oxide and me?

i.ytimg.com
 
2012-09-28 10:25:38 PM
I was expecting Tide for Mormons.'

sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2012-09-30 11:38:38 PM
Shut up and take my money.
 
2012-09-30 11:40:39 PM

you have pee hands: I'm not so sure I want to become a walking air filter.


You are already. All walking breathing creatures are.
 
2012-10-01 10:44:04 PM
My first reaction was how much atmosphere cleaning can my clothes really accomplish. 5g sounds quite impressive.
 
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