If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Whiskey Reviewer)   People all around the world are pissed off about whiskey   (whiskeyreviewer.com) divider line 86
    More: Dumbass, Diageo, Pernod Ricard, Duke of Edinburgh  
•       •       •

8615 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Sep 2012 at 9:44 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



86 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-09-28 09:45:08 AM
Meh. These sort of "debates" really just serve to let a few insiders show off how discerning they can be.

What the "insiders" won't tell you is how easy it is to become your own whiskey maker. And no, I'm not talking about making it from scratch, like grinding corn and gathering peat, whatever the hell that is. Seriously, peat? Has anyone ever seen peat? Yeah, it's right over there by the snipes. Ha ha, very funny.

But you can make your own whiskey, and it's as easy as buying a bottle. Like, say you buy a bottle of the good stuff, Johnny Walker Yellow label or something like that. Cutty Sark. Whatever, it doesn't really matter. You take it home and you open it. And then what you do is go into the forest and find some wood. This is the hard part, because you want to be selective...all wood is different, after all. Oak tastes best, that's why they use it to age wine, but your own palette should be your guide. Sniff the pine, the elm, whatever...if it smells good, try it. Then take the wood back and file it down so you have a cup or two of shavings. Pour those into the whiskey bottle, then seal it back up.

Now, leave the whiskey bottle alone for a few months (that's the hard part!) in a cool, dark place. The wood will begin to age/flavor the whiskey. And, voila...you've made your own!

Don't forget to strain it before you drink it, though.
 
2012-09-28 09:47:17 AM

Pocket Ninja: Meh. These sort of "debates" really just serve to let a few insiders show off how discerning they can be.

What the "insiders" won't tell you is how easy it is to become your own whiskey maker. And no, I'm not talking about making it from scratch, like grinding corn and gathering peat, whatever the hell that is. Seriously, peat? Has anyone ever seen peat? Yeah, it's right over there by the snipes. Ha ha, very funny.

But you can make your own whiskey, and it's as easy as buying a bottle. Like, say you buy a bottle of the good stuff, Johnny Walker Yellow label or something like that. Cutty Sark. Whatever, it doesn't really matter. You take it home and you open it. And then what you do is go into the forest and find some wood. This is the hard part, because you want to be selective...all wood is different, after all. Oak tastes best, that's why they use it to age wine, but your own palette should be your guide. Sniff the pine, the elm, whatever...if it smells good, try it. Then take the wood back and file it down so you have a cup or two of shavings. Pour those into the whiskey bottle, then seal it back up.

Now, leave the whiskey bottle alone for a few months (that's the hard part!) in a cool, dark place. The wood will begin to age/flavor the whiskey. And, voila...you've made your own!

Don't forget to strain it before you drink it, though.


Wood you say it tastes better?
 
2012-09-28 09:49:30 AM
In before the whisk"e"y douchebags. Certain bourbon/whiskey makers use the "whisky" spelling due to their Scottish heritage.
 
2012-09-28 09:51:09 AM

Pocket Ninja: Meh. These sort of "debates" really just serve to let a few insiders show off how discerning they can be.

What the "insiders" won't tell you is how easy it is to become your own whiskey maker. And no, I'm not talking about making it from scratch, like grinding corn and gathering peat, whatever the hell that is. Seriously, peat? Has anyone ever seen peat? Yeah, it's right over there by the snipes. Ha ha, very funny.

But you can make your own whiskey, and it's as easy as buying a bottle. Like, say you buy a bottle of the good stuff, Johnny Walker Yellow label or something like that. Cutty Sark. Whatever, it doesn't really matter. You take it home and you open it. And then what you do is go into the forest and find some wood. This is the hard part, because you want to be selective...all wood is different, after all. Oak tastes best, that's why they use it to age wine, but your own palette should be your guide. Sniff the pine, the elm, whatever...if it smells good, try it. Then take the wood back and file it down so you have a cup or two of shavings. Pour those into the whiskey bottle, then seal it back up.

Now, leave the whiskey bottle alone for a few months (that's the hard part!) in a cool, dark place. The wood will begin to age/flavor the whiskey. And, voila...you've made your own!

Don't forget to strain it before you drink it, though.


Pocket Ninja, if you are ever in my neck of the woods, I will buy you a single malt, just because you are awesome in your genius.
 
2012-09-28 09:52:38 AM

Pocket Ninja: Meh. These sort of "debates" really just serve to let a few insiders show off how discerning they can be.

What the "insiders" won't tell you is how easy it is to become your own whiskey maker. And no, I'm not talking about making it from scratch, like grinding corn and gathering peat, whatever the hell that is. Seriously, peat? Has anyone ever seen peat? Yeah, it's right over there by the snipes. Ha ha, very funny.

But you can make your own whiskey, and it's as easy as buying a bottle. Like, say you buy a bottle of the good stuff, Johnny Walker Yellow label or something like that. Cutty Sark. Whatever, it doesn't really matter. You take it home and you open it. And then what you do is go into the forest and find some wood. This is the hard part, because you want to be selective...all wood is different, after all. Oak tastes best, that's why they use it to age wine, but your own palette should be your guide. Sniff the pine, the elm, whatever...if it smells good, try it. Then take the wood back and file it down so you have a cup or two of shavings. Pour those into the whiskey bottle, then seal it back up.

Now, leave the whiskey bottle alone for a few months (that's the hard part!) in a cool, dark place. The wood will begin to age/flavor the whiskey. And, voila...you've made your own!

Don't forget to strain it before you drink it, though.


You're an IDIOT
OAK?? WTF are you thinking?? File it down?? You're DESTROYING THE ESSENCE of the wood doing that.

*Everyone here* knows the best and most effective is to go all natural...and also, those wimpy woods like Oak and Birch.....NO FLAVOR.
You need to find virgin, untouched, but recently opened pine codes lightly roasted to release the proper flavor, *however* they must have been heated only by forest fire started by all natural lightning. And they can't be too scorched because you get that nasty charcoal flavor and not release all the flavorful terpene alcohols.

/damn right I'm a whisky snob
 
2012-09-28 09:52:41 AM
Let's get this over with. 

newsimg.bbc.co.uk 

DRINK!

//Feck
 
2012-09-28 09:53:27 AM
I must say that the only true whiskey needs no aging statement. You see, on the yacht we only drink MacDouglas Fine Pelt reserve. Cask-aged for centuries in the darkest depths of a small dimensional paradox and handcrafted by blind whiskeysmiths for true body and flavor, MacDouglas gains its depth through a sieving process divined through the entrails of a newly born unicorn.

Exquisite.
 
2012-09-28 09:53:58 AM
I like Scotch and Bourbon. A lot. However there is definitely diminishing returns with price, well it's more like a bell curve, at least for me. The cheapest ones are lower quality and taste and as they price goes up so does the flavor, but after a certain price point you are paying more and more for less and less of a difference between the bottle just below it in terms of quality.

That's how it works for me anyway, with my palate after about $100-$150 a bottle I don't see a big enough difference to justify buying it.

/DNRTFA
 
2012-09-28 09:54:27 AM
I will quote Edward Kennedy Ellington

"If it sounds good, it is good"
 
2012-09-28 09:54:56 AM
I'm getting a kick because I work with a guy whose family owns the Buffalo Trace Distillery....



....wait I just remember he owes me a bottle!!
 
2012-09-28 09:55:58 AM

InitialCommentGuy: I must say that the only true whiskey needs no aging statement. You see, on the yacht we only drink MacDouglas Fine Pelt reserve. Cask-aged for centuries in the darkest depths of a small dimensional paradox and handcrafted by blind whiskeysmiths for true body and flavor, MacDouglas gains its depth through a sieving process divined through the entrails of a newly born unicorn.

Exquisite.


I bet you said that with your pinkey extended.....who do you think you are? John Fitzgerald Page??

/
 
2012-09-28 09:56:51 AM

babysealclubber: In before the whisk"e"y douchebags. Certain bourbon/whiskey makers use the "whisky" spelling due to their Scottish heritage.


Pretty sure they have meant two different drinks, made in different ways and in different places for a lot of years now.
 
2012-09-28 09:59:26 AM

ChipNASA: Pocket Ninja: Meh. These sort of "debates" really just serve to let a few insiders show off how discerning they can be.

What the "insiders" won't tell you is how easy it is to become your own whiskey maker. And no, I'm not talking about making it from scratch, like grinding corn and gathering peat, whatever the hell that is. Seriously, peat? Has anyone ever seen peat? Yeah, it's right over there by the snipes. Ha ha, very funny.

But you can make your own whiskey, and it's as easy as buying a bottle. Like, say you buy a bottle of the good stuff, Johnny Walker Yellow label or something like that. Cutty Sark. Whatever, it doesn't really matter. You take it home and you open it. And then what you do is go into the forest and find some wood. This is the hard part, because you want to be selective...all wood is different, after all. Oak tastes best, that's why they use it to age wine, but your own palette should be your guide. Sniff the pine, the elm, whatever...if it smells good, try it. Then take the wood back and file it down so you have a cup or two of shavings. Pour those into the whiskey bottle, then seal it back up.

Now, leave the whiskey bottle alone for a few months (that's the hard part!) in a cool, dark place. The wood will begin to age/flavor the whiskey. And, voila...you've made your own!

Don't forget to strain it before you drink it, though.

You're an IDIOT
OAK?? WTF are you thinking?? File it down?? You're DESTROYING THE ESSENCE of the wood doing that.

*Everyone here* knows the best and most effective is to go all natural...and also, those wimpy woods like Oak and Birch.....NO FLAVOR.
You need to find virgin, untouched, but recently opened pine codes lightly roasted to release the proper flavor, *however* they must have been heated only by forest fire started by all natural lightning. And they can't be too scorched because you get that nasty charcoal flavor and not release all the flavorful terpene alcohols.

/damn right I'm a whisky snob


I use particle board. You get that nice glue flavor in there, too. And the glue helps thicken it up, turns it into kind of a whiskey soup.
 
2012-09-28 09:59:31 AM
images2.wikia.nocookie.net

But..why?
 
2012-09-28 09:59:35 AM
Whisk(e)y makes you piss, I know that much.
 
2012-09-28 10:00:03 AM
I don't know about you guys, but I'm telling my wife that I want something from this place for Christmas.
 
2012-09-28 10:01:15 AM

babysealclubber: In before the whisk"e"y douchebags. Certain bourbon/whiskey makers use the "whisky" spelling due to their Scottish heritage.


As a general rule of thumb:
Irish or American = Whiskey
Scottish or Canadian = Whisky
 
2012-09-28 10:02:26 AM
Drink whatever you like. If you like two types of booze equally, drink the cheaper one.
 
2012-09-28 10:03:13 AM
www.useit.com

Argh! Can this be summarized? I got tired of reading trying to find what the argument was about.
 
2012-09-28 10:05:05 AM
I used to spend a lot of money on aged single malt scotch. Until I discovered cognac and rum. Now I save a lot of money. I will still drink it if someone buys one for me.
 
2012-09-28 10:05:20 AM

reillan: ChipNASA: Pocket Ninja: Meh. These sort of "debates" really just serve to let a few insiders show off how discerning they can be.

What the "insiders" won't tell you is how easy it is to become your own whiskey maker. And no, I'm not talking about making it from scratch, like grinding corn and gathering peat, whatever the hell that is. Seriously, peat? Has anyone ever seen peat? Yeah, it's right over there by the snipes. Ha ha, very funny.

But you can make your own whiskey, and it's as easy as buying a bottle. Like, say you buy a bottle of the good stuff, Johnny Walker Yellow label or something like that. Cutty Sark. Whatever, it doesn't really matter. You take it home and you open it. And then what you do is go into the forest and find some wood. This is the hard part, because you want to be selective...all wood is different, after all. Oak tastes best, that's why they use it to age wine, but your own palette should be your guide. Sniff the pine, the elm, whatever...if it smells good, try it. Then take the wood back and file it down so you have a cup or two of shavings. Pour those into the whiskey bottle, then seal it back up.

Now, leave the whiskey bottle alone for a few months (that's the hard part!) in a cool, dark place. The wood will begin to age/flavor the whiskey. And, voila...you've made your own!

Don't forget to strain it before you drink it, though.

You're an IDIOT
OAK?? WTF are you thinking?? File it down?? You're DESTROYING THE ESSENCE of the wood doing that.

*Everyone here* knows the best and most effective is to go all natural...and also, those wimpy woods like Oak and Birch.....NO FLAVOR.
You need to find virgin, untouched, but recently opened pine codes lightly roasted to release the proper flavor, *however* they must have been heated only by forest fire started by all natural lightning. And they can't be too scorched because you get that nasty charcoal flavor and not release all the flavorful terpene alcohols.

/damn right I'm a whisky snob

I ...


You probably shop at IKEA and you think their carry out meatballs are gourmet. YUCK

Oh and THIS, THIS is what all other whiskies should be compared to....THEY have been making whiskie for at LEAST 150 years so they totally know what their doing

www.beefcubesteakrecipes.com
 
2012-09-28 10:05:31 AM

Old_Chief_Scott: I don't know about you guys, but I'm telling my wife that I want something from this place for Christmas.


Dude thanks for the link. Sending that to Miss. Patrol for Festivus too.
 
2012-09-28 10:06:45 AM

reillan: I use particle board. You get that nice glue flavor in there, too. And the glue helps thicken it up, turns it into kind of a whiskey soup.


24.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-09-28 10:07:43 AM
It's Uisce Beatha and the feckin' Irish invented it.

"People, what a bunch of bastards"
 
2012-09-28 10:08:39 AM
Taste first then age. That is is you like Macallan (like I do) there is a definite improvement as it gets older. I do find the 18 year the best and what little of 25 year old I tried didn't justify the cost. But if you go to another brand, a 9 or 12 year old might taste perfect to you.
 
2012-09-28 10:10:01 AM
I don't understand the controversy over the age statements remark. I would think anyone remotely familiar with whisky would realize that age statements are a generally poor determinant of quality - especially between distillers. Case in point: Lagavulin matures their whisky for 16 years, while Laphroaig matures theirs for only 10. The distilleries are both on the island of Islay (in fact their only a mile apart) and the whiskies both have a very peaty taste. But the Lagavulin isn't objectively better than the Laphroaig - I actually prefer the Laphroaig, and so do most people I know.
 
2012-09-28 10:11:48 AM
I think this is obligatory....do they make you randy?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUVfVfrCtnk

Whisky makes you frisky....
 
2012-09-28 10:13:37 AM

The Irresponsible Captain: [www.useit.com image 340x450]

Argh! Can this be summarized? I got tired of reading trying to find what the argument was about.


Some people claim that age is the most important consideration in whiskey. That say a 20 is always better than a 10, no matter what. Even across brands.
 
2012-09-28 10:14:35 AM
My fave:
acorkabove.com
 
2012-09-28 10:14:40 AM
I read that as "whitey" and cynically thought "what else is new?"
 
2012-09-28 10:15:50 AM
TFA: "flavor is the key facet of a whiskey, and that an age is just one factor that goes into producing that flavor"

How could such a trivially-true statement set off a firestorm? The retort doesn't even contradict that statement, it just essentially whines "b-b-b-but it's an *important* factor!". Yeah, no shiat.
But at the end of the day it's about the flavor. No-one's giving a shiat whiskey a pass because it's aged more than a whiskey they enjoy.
 
2012-09-28 10:16:24 AM
whiskeygoldmine.com
This is now a whiskey porn thread, right?

I like this one. A lot. Pretty damn tasty without being overly expensive.
 
2012-09-28 10:17:10 AM

Hershey Highway Patrol: Old_Chief_Scott: I don't know about you guys, but I'm telling my wife that I want something from this place for Christmas.

Dude thanks for the link. Sending that to Miss. Patrol for Festivus too.


The quality and regulatory affairs guy at my work swears by those things. I can't wait to put some Seagrams 7 in one for a couple of months and see what happens.
 
2012-09-28 10:17:53 AM
I'll use this thread as an excuse to post pics of my trip to Woodford Reserve (my personal favorite bourbon)

farm9.staticflickr.com

farm9.staticflickr.com


And the best part of the tour, the sample:
farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2012-09-28 10:18:20 AM

reillan: I use particle board. You get that nice glue flavor in there, too. And the glue helps thicken it up, turns it into kind of a whiskey soup.


Plus you can leave it like it is or paint it up. It's still gonna taste like particle board.
 
2012-09-28 10:18:27 AM

tricycleracer: reillan: I use particle board. You get that nice glue flavor in there, too. And the glue helps thicken it up, turns it into kind of a whiskey soup.

[24.media.tumblr.com image 500x667]


nom nom nom
 
2012-09-28 10:19:43 AM

reillan: I use particle board. You get that nice glue flavor in there, too. And the glue helps thicken it up, turns it into kind of a whiskey soup.


I put my own wood in there, if you no what I mean. Add a bit of the "Irish Cream", if you know what I mean, and I think you do. I'm not Irish, but no one has heard of Dutch/German Cream.
 
2012-09-28 10:20:06 AM

My favorite (in my price range...)

www.justaguything.com
 
2012-09-28 10:20:24 AM

skrame: if you no what I mean


*know, damnit.
 
2012-09-28 10:20:26 AM
Who cares. If you're not drinking to get drunk you're doing it wrong.
 
2012-09-28 10:20:29 AM

rev. dave: I used to spend a lot of money on aged single malt scotch. Until I discovered cognac and rum. Now I save a lot of money. I will still drink it if someone buys one for me.


www.thechampagnecompany.com

www.france44.com

i2.cdn.turner.com 

Agreed.
 
2012-09-28 10:23:10 AM
Better to be pissed off than pissed on.

/Or just pissed in general
//In all senses of the term

Blasphemy: You could win a lot of money in bars by serving unidentified drinks in opaque glasses and betting the drinker he can't tell what brand it is. Difficulty bonus: make sure one glass is his "favorite brand"
//Until you got your ass beat and thrown out of the place
 
2012-09-28 10:24:19 AM
Writer is right though, in my personal experience, a 25 year old whiskey isn't necessarily better than a 9 year old. I like Woodford reserve (a 7 year). My favorite scotch is Johnny Walker Red label, which most people regard as low brow scotch. But to each, his own.
 
2012-09-28 10:24:20 AM

ChipNASA: InitialCommentGuy: I must say that the only true whiskey needs no aging statement. You see, on the yacht we only drink MacDouglas Fine Pelt reserve. Cask-aged for centuries in the darkest depths of a small dimensional paradox and handcrafted by blind whiskeysmiths for true body and flavor, MacDouglas gains its depth through a sieving process divined through the entrails of a newly born unicorn.

Exquisite.

I bet you said that with your pinkey extended.....who do you think you are? John Fitzgerald Page??

/


Needing to extend your pinky while making a comment shows your base upbringing. My pinkies have evolved to a constant extension at a 30 degree angle.

Why do I even bother trying to enlighten?
 
2012-09-28 10:24:59 AM
Whiskey threaed.... this is relevant to my interests
 
2012-09-28 10:26:53 AM
Jim Beam for every day, Basil Haden for special occasions. I got cheap tastes, what can I say? I've tried more expensive bourbon and I just don't taste the 'betterness'. If it tastes good drink it.

/Jack Daniels Tastes like Kingsford Lighter fluid smells, nasty.
 
2012-09-28 10:28:03 AM
This is relevant to my interests as I just bought a bottle of 15 year old Ben Nevis single malt this afternoon.

My reasons behind buying this particular one. It tastes really nice and I like it, that's it :-)
 
2012-09-28 10:32:39 AM
Anyone here ever tried Angel's Envy?

Link
 
2012-09-28 10:34:42 AM
Highland Park 12 year. That's all you need to know about whisky.
 
2012-09-28 10:36:26 AM

ROBO-Jesus: I don't understand the controversy over the age statements remark. I would think anyone remotely familiar with whisky would realize that age statements are a generally poor determinant of quality - especially between distillers. Case in point: Lagavulin matures their whisky for 16 years, while Laphroaig matures theirs for only 10. The distilleries are both on the island of Islay (in fact their only a mile apart) and the whiskies both have a very peaty taste. But the Lagavulin isn't objectively better than the Laphroaig - I actually prefer the Laphroaig, and so do most people I know.


I prefer Lagavulin over Leapfrog, and Ardbeg over both any day of the week.

/6 unopened bottles of the 17y.o. in the whisky cabinet
//no, you can't have one
 
Displayed 50 of 86 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report