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(Washington Post)   Curiosity has found proof that there was once abundant, fast-moving water on Mars that could have supported life   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 221
    More: Cool, Mars Science Laboratory, NASA, Mars landing, imaging science, Planetary Science, John Grotzinger, streambeds, pebbles  
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14258 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2012 at 11:16 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 11:44:48 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Other solvents tend not to wear rock in the same fashion. Mars rock is composed from a lot of silicon and lesser basalts than Earth, but water erosion is distinct from streams of, say, liquid methane. Water is polar; it hydrates silica minerals, and has an astonishing vapor pressure to atomic weight ratio.

Meanwhile the chances of Mars getting cold enough to liquefy methane in volume and rain it from the sky in sufficient quantities to erode rock is between slim and none.


Those pictures....it's like I'm at the beach. Smooth rocks, different colors - meaning different compositions - meaning - from different places. That would require a substantial sustained flow. And since Mars has one/third the gravity, it was probably flowing for a good long time to smooth out those rocks. Amazing.

Fossils may be a problem though. With less gravity a life form could spread out more, would/could be more "feathery?" They may be hard to spot.
 
2012-09-27 11:45:47 PM  
how fast does water usually move?
 
2012-09-27 11:45:49 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: fusillade762: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

I think the theory is that Mars lost its magnetic field and solar radiation fried the place. Any scienticians feel free to correct me if I'm off base.

True. The atmosphere, even of Earth, needs a constant refresh of gasses to replenish the losses to space and the solar wind. Having a magnetic field is crucial to not having your gas shield stripped away.

Now pass me the sunblock. And don't forget to do the tops of your ears - you'll thank me when you're 90.


Unless you are Venus.
 
2012-09-27 11:46:23 PM  

redly1: because water is the only liquid in the universe


i45.tinypic.com

YOU

i47.tinypic.com

EVERYONE ELSE
 
2012-09-27 11:48:01 PM  

NewportBarGuy: redly1: because water is the only liquid in the universe

[i45.tinypic.com image 500x568]

YOU

[i47.tinypic.com image 432x359]

EVERYONE ELSE


well no at some tempitures every thing is fluid, like water
 
2012-09-27 11:48:15 PM  
Of course, as soon as they stop looking for water they find it.
 
2012-09-27 11:48:43 PM  
There is almost certainly life on Mars.

There are giant sinkholes in the surface of the planet that are clearly visible. Around these zones, as the seasons change, the amount of Methane in the atmosphere increases signficantly. The only process we know that releases methane into the atmosphere like this is biological.

So the question really is, "Why aren't we searching for life on Mars?" We know where to look, and we aren't even trying.
 
2012-09-27 11:49:03 PM  

mudpants: how fast does water usually move?


Speed of gravity, in this case about 1/3rd Earf so 11 ft/sec.
 
2012-09-27 11:49:25 PM  

WelldeadLink: Of course, as soon as they stop looking for water they find it.


NASA found my car keys!
 
2012-09-27 11:50:36 PM  

mudpants: NewportBarGuy: redly1: because water is the only liquid in the universe

[i45.tinypic.com image 500x568]

YOU

[i47.tinypic.com image 432x359]

EVERYONE ELSE

well no at some temptures every thing is fluid, like water


Well, pressure is part of the equation too. Liquid water can't exist on Mars at any temperature. It sublimates directly from ice to a gas.
 
2012-09-27 11:50:57 PM  

mudpants: Marcus Aurelius: soosh: Marcus Aurelius: Richard Saunders: Just because it's a fluid, does not mean it's water...

/or did I not get the memo?

Other solvents tend not to wear rock in the same fashion. Mars rock is composed from a lot of silicon and lesser basalts than Earth, but water erosion is distinct from streams of, say, liquid methane. Water is polar; it hydrates silica minerals, and has an astonishing vapor pressure to atomic weight ratio.

Meanwhile the chances of Mars getting cold enough to liquefy methane in volume and rain it from the sky in sufficient quantities to erode rock is between slim and none.

well sure. but what if it wasn't liquid methane but rather iced tea? didn't think of that, did ya?

That would explain the red color, no doubt. But given the convenience stores wars we have on this planet between Wawa and 7-11 and the Gook-n-Go, I think we can assume that Taco Bell won the war on that planet.

Sad, really.

are you gay cause I have a couson that't gaay. and he is really cute and stuff.


Why, no, thank you mudpants, I am only happy. Alas Alack. But I bet if your cousin's peener was small enough and he was hairles like a mole rat and could hold his tiny balls back between his legs like you most likely can, I could mock him for the relative he is of yours.
 
2012-09-27 11:51:09 PM  

fusillade762: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

I think the theory is that Mars lost its magnetic field and solar radiation fried the place. Any scienticians feel free to correct me if I'm off base.


As a professional planetologist, I have to agree with this.
 
2012-09-27 11:51:17 PM  

redly1: because water is the only liquid in the universe


Really? Please be double, reverse sarcasm.
 
2012-09-27 11:51:36 PM  
F*ck yeah! Science! In space! Two of my favorite things together.
 
2012-09-27 11:52:00 PM  
without any force, it will not move at all. If ya don't poke it it will just sit there. I refrazed an old theory
 
2012-09-27 11:52:01 PM  

StopLurkListen: well no at some temptures every thing is fluid, like water

Well, pressure is part of the equation too. Liquid water can't exist on Mars['s surface] at any temperature. It sublimates directly from ice to a gas.


[It could exist as liquid underground. FTFM]
 
2012-09-27 11:53:22 PM  

markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..


i112.photobucket.com

Hey baby, wanna come to my party boat on the river? On MARS?
 
2012-09-27 11:53:33 PM  
Picture 3 is a fossilized penis.
 
2012-09-27 11:54:12 PM  
Oops I mean picture #2
 
2012-09-27 11:56:10 PM  
Maybe I AM TOO SERIOUS now
 
2012-09-27 11:56:42 PM  

Metaluna Mutant: yeah, plenty of water -- just don't drink any.

[dvdmedia.ign.com image 480x270]


One of my favorite episodes right there.
 
2012-09-27 11:57:01 PM  

justtray: There is almost certainly life on Mars.

There are giant sinkholes in the surface of the planet that are clearly visible. Around these zones, as the seasons change, the amount of Methane in the atmosphere increases signficantly. The only process we know that releases methane into the atmosphere like this is biological.

So the question really is, "Why aren't we searching for life on Mars?" We know where to look, and we aren't even trying.



So what you're saying is that there are cows in the sinkholes, is that right then?
 
2012-09-27 11:57:30 PM  
When water formed on earth, was it as vapor in the atmosphere or terrestrial liquid?
 
2012-09-27 11:57:34 PM  
again, fast moving?
 
2012-09-27 11:57:57 PM  
Was this before or after it killed the cat?
 
2012-09-27 11:58:39 PM  

cman: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

Probably someone on our planet had some sort of tame-travelling predestination paradox into the past and somehow killed all life on Mars by accident. When it comes to destroying life, we humans are #1


It was a sound of thunder...
 
2012-09-27 11:59:30 PM  

Ambivalence: So what happened to it?


God used it for the great flood, and forgot to put it back when he was done.
 
2012-09-28 12:02:48 AM  

Piestar: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

God used it for the great flood, and forgot to put it back when he was done.


Sooooooooooooo close!

i48.tinypic.com
 
2012-09-28 12:04:34 AM  
I'm sort of hoping there is no life on Mars, at least not currently. Then we won't have any ethical issues should we ever want to terraform the planet.

'Cause I can definitely see some 23rd century version of PETA protesting Martian terraforming because it will kill off the native bacteria.
 
2012-09-28 12:08:51 AM  

grinnel: When water formed on earth, was it as vapor in the atmosphere or terrestrial liquid?


African or European?
 
2012-09-28 12:10:15 AM  

adeist69: justtray: There is almost certainly life on Mars.

There are giant sinkholes in the surface of the planet that are clearly visible. Around these zones, as the seasons change, the amount of Methane in the atmosphere increases signficantly. The only process we know that releases methane into the atmosphere like this is biological.

So the question really is, "Why aren't we searching for life on Mars?" We know where to look, and we aren't even trying.


So what you're saying is that there are cows in the sinkholes, is that right then?


More likely a plethora of microbial bacteria.
 
2012-09-28 12:11:56 AM  

NewportBarGuy: WelldeadLink: Of course, as soon as they stop looking for water they find it.

NASA found my car keys!


NASA found me a parking spot at the mall... at CHRISTMAS!
 
2012-09-28 12:11:57 AM  

way south: Lsherm: markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..

Trilobites look pretty advanced, all things considered. I'd settle for fossilized bacteria, if the rover can detect it.

The problem being that finding life, or fossil life, would set a mandate for a manned mission to study one of the most revolutionary discoveries in the history of mankind.
I'm going to play the conspiracy thoery card and say that no scientist or politican with a fiefdom to protect wants their hands tied like that.

Whatever piece of equipment disovers anything will be declared faulty and the results inconclusive.


Are you kidding?

I'd gladly beat the myself half to death with my own arm which I ripped off for the purpose just to see the day we find current or past life on Mars.

The politician who greenlights a mars mission will get a fanbase a mile wide and a league long. He could be President if they find and return life.

Scientists are morons when it comes to anything but science. PR is most certainly not their strong suit. I mean, in a world where you can get a billion dollars for an ICBM to use on Sadam's house, how is NASA's funding being cut? Bad PR, that's how.
 
2012-09-28 12:12:00 AM  

way south: Lsherm: markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..

Trilobites look pretty advanced, all things considered. I'd settle for fossilized bacteria, if the rover can detect it.

The problem being that finding life, or fossil life, would set a mandate for a manned mission to study one of the most revolutionary discoveries in the history of mankind.
I'm going to play the conspiracy thoery card and say that no scientist or politican with a fiefdom to protect wants their hands tied like that.

Whatever piece of equipment disovers anything will be declared faulty and the results inconclusive.


It wouldn't require a "manned mission" - just a more focused mission like the one they're already doing. Expensive, but not that expensive, especially given all the time in the world, which we have. They managed to hit a targeted landing zone once within a 20 mile radius on a mission that was planned over a decade ago. They could do the same thing again with better accuracy at the same cost today.
 
2012-09-28 12:13:22 AM  
i.chzbgr.com
 
2012-09-28 12:13:59 AM  

StopLurkListen: mudpants: NewportBarGuy: redly1: because water is the only liquid in the universe

[i45.tinypic.com image 500x568]

YOU

[i47.tinypic.com image 432x359]

EVERYONE ELSE

well no at some temptures every thing is fluid, like water

Well, pressure is part of the equation too. Liquid water can't exist on Mars at any temperature. It sublimates directly from ice to a gas.


Today. A couple hundred million years ago?

Who knows?

/curiosity of course
 
2012-09-28 12:15:20 AM  
I'm pretty sure the next thing they're going to find is a fossilized skeleton of a hominid.
 
2012-09-28 12:15:37 AM  

mudpants: again, fast moving?


Isn't it time to get off daddy's computer?
 
2012-09-28 12:16:01 AM  
Mars and Earth once shared an orbit. They crashed sending Mars to where it is now.
 
2012-09-28 12:21:35 AM  

justtray: There is almost certainly life on Mars.

There are giant sinkholes in the surface of the planet that are clearly visible. Around these zones, as the seasons change, the amount of Methane in the atmosphere increases signficantly. The only process we know that releases methane into the atmosphere like this is biological.

So the question really is, "Why aren't we searching for life on Mars?" We know where to look, and we aren't even trying.


Because, like I said, scientists suck at everything but science.

Microbiologists know EXACTLY how horrificly destructive even one Earth microbe could be to a native martian organism population. And of course vice versa.

The engineers know how hard it would be to actually search for life up there like you can in elementary school pond water, because optics and shovels are farkin' heavy and require things an interplanetary probe can't do without sacrificing other important functions.

The Astronomers need the "boring" rock analyses to test their extrapolations based on orbital readings for, hopefully, exploring other planets quicker in the future.

But I'm with you. fark scientists. fark the millitary. fark the martians. Let's send a probe to places with the most potential for life and give that farker a shovel and microscope and a microphone/speaker system.

"Hey martians! Come out, come out whereever you are!" *plays freebird* Now let's dig!
 
2012-09-28 12:22:27 AM  
I'm watching Ancient Aliens right now
 
2012-09-28 12:23:15 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: cman: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

Probably someone on our planet had some sort of tame-travelling predestination paradox into the past and somehow killed all life on Mars by accident. When it comes to destroying life, we humans are #1

You betcha.


It was just one lousy little crushed butterfly.
 
2012-09-28 12:24:19 AM  

Salmon: I'm watching Ancient Aliens right now


You're the reason I cancelled cable. Thanks for saving me money!
 
2012-09-28 12:26:06 AM  
blog.gadgethelpline.com
 
2012-09-28 12:26:46 AM  

doglover: The Astronomers need the "boring" rock analyses to test their extrapolations based on orbital readings for, hopefully, exploring other planets quicker in the future.


Okay, I'll accept this assertion. Now, why does that prevent us from searching in places where we have a high probability of finding life?

And what's wrong with sending probes to places that very likely have life with a shovel and a microscope? Is that not exactly what we are doing with Curiosity?

I really hope my sarcasm meter is just broken and you aren't a retarded NASA apologist....
 
2012-09-28 12:29:15 AM  

TastyEloi: 'Cause I can definitely see some 23rd century version of PETA protesting Martian terraforming because it will kill off the native bacteria.


upload.wikimedia.org

Way ahead of you.
 
2012-09-28 12:29:53 AM  

TastyEloi: I'm sort of hoping there is no life on Mars, at least not currently. Then we won't have any ethical issues should we ever want to terraform the planet.

'Cause I can definitely see some 23rd century version of PETA protesting Martian terraforming because it will kill off the native bacteria.


Unless you can think of a way to get Mars' core molten and spinning I don't think terraforming is likely to be very successful.
 
2012-09-28 12:33:53 AM  

tuxq: I'm sure it did -- right before politician-run energy companies raped it dry, destroyed the atmosphere, and destroyed the entire planet.


"I don't believe human activity causes global climate change. Mainly because I'm makin' bank, biatches!"
 
2012-09-28 12:33:59 AM  
The proof was...

ronaldweinland.info

Sure sign the life was intelligent
 
2012-09-28 12:34:39 AM  

justtray: doglover: The Astronomers need the "boring" rock analyses to test their extrapolations based on orbital readings for, hopefully, exploring other planets quicker in the future.

Okay, I'll accept this assertion. Now, why does that prevent us from searching in places where we have a high probability of finding life?

And what's wrong with sending probes to places that very likely have life with a shovel and a microscope? Is that not exactly what we are doing with Curiosity?

I really hope my sarcasm meter is just broken and you aren't a retarded NASA apologist....


Because getting a decent microscope lab on a robot that can actually dig a proper hole to mars is one piece is A LOT harder and more expensive than sending the kinds of missions we do send, and the value to science of finding microbes on Mars is minimal. Meanwhile, learning the geology of mars to double check what we think we know is important for reliability of future observations.
 
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