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(Washington Post)   Curiosity has found proof that there was once abundant, fast-moving water on Mars that could have supported life   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 221
    More: Cool, Mars Science Laboratory, NASA, Mars landing, imaging science, Planetary Science, John Grotzinger, streambeds, pebbles  
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14248 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2012 at 11:16 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 06:47:52 PM
Awesome!
 
2012-09-27 06:49:47 PM
I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-09-27 06:51:19 PM
Toss this press release on top of the stack of other "water! life!" press releases. When the bottom page turns to diamond, read the top page and believe it.
 
2012-09-27 07:11:01 PM

markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..


I wonder if the folks at NASA are kicking themselves right about now?

Curiosity rover: why Nasa isn't looking for life on Mars
 
2012-09-27 07:48:44 PM
COULD HAVE, but unlikely.
 
2012-09-27 08:30:52 PM

markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..


I believe we will find one as well. Too bad the people who humanity most desperately needs to change will never incorporate this new information into their worldview.
 
2012-09-27 08:38:33 PM
So what happened to it?
 
2012-09-27 08:41:56 PM

Ambivalence: So what happened to it?


Probably someone on our planet had some sort of tame-travelling predestination paradox into the past and somehow killed all life on Mars by accident. When it comes to destroying life, we humans are #1
 
2012-09-27 08:56:37 PM

Ambivalence: So what happened to it?


I think the theory is that Mars lost its magnetic field and solar radiation fried the place. Any scienticians feel free to correct me if I'm off base.
 
2012-09-27 09:00:24 PM

markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..


Mars Jesus!
 
2012-09-27 09:02:48 PM

fusillade762: markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..

I wonder if the folks at NASA are kicking themselves right about now?

Curiosity rover: why Nasa isn't looking for life on Mars


That's just like, your opinion,of his opinion, man
 
2012-09-27 09:07:27 PM

fusillade762: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

I think the theory is that Mars lost its magnetic field and solar radiation fried the place. Any scienticians feel free to correct me if I'm off base.


I'm not a scientician, but I do have an internet degree in doctorology.
 
2012-09-27 09:08:49 PM
It's NASA, not Nasa, though I am probably guilty of it too.
 
2012-09-27 09:12:01 PM

fusillade762: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

I think the theory is that Mars lost its magnetic field and solar radiation fried the place. Any scienticians feel free to correct me if I'm off base.


True. The atmosphere, even of Earth, needs a constant refresh of gasses to replenish the losses to space and the solar wind. Having a magnetic field is crucial to not having your gas shield stripped away.

Now pass me the sunblock. And don't forget to do the tops of your ears - you'll thank me when you're 90.
 
2012-09-27 09:20:50 PM

cman: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

Probably someone on our planet had some sort of tame-travelling predestination paradox into the past and somehow killed all life on Mars by accident. When it comes to destroying life, we humans are #1


You betcha.
 
2012-09-27 09:30:18 PM
Just because it's a fluid, does not mean it's water...

/or did I not get the memo?
 
2012-09-27 09:38:27 PM

Ambivalence: So what happened to it?


Oh, sorry, my bad.

We're cool though, right?
 
2012-09-27 09:55:41 PM

markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..


Trilobites look pretty advanced, all things considered. I'd settle for fossilized bacteria, if the rover can detect it.
 
2012-09-27 10:10:29 PM

FloydA: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

Oh, sorry, my bad.

We're cool though, right?


I can't believe you drank the whole planet...
 
2012-09-27 11:18:04 PM
and it is this water that gives Jack Daniels a flavor that cannot be copied.
 
2012-09-27 11:18:09 PM

Richard Saunders: Just because it's a fluid, does not mean it's water...

/or did I not get the memo?


Other solvents tend not to wear rock in the same fashion. Mars rock is composed from a lot of silicon and lesser basalts than Earth, but water erosion is distinct from streams of, say, liquid methane. Water is polar; it hydrates silica minerals, and has an astonishing vapor pressure to atomic weight ratio.

Meanwhile the chances of Mars getting cold enough to liquefy methane in volume and rain it from the sky in sufficient quantities to erode rock is between slim and none.
 
2012-09-27 11:19:55 PM
The Doctor approves.
 
2012-09-27 11:21:30 PM

markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..


We'll have to buy it a cell phone?

www.theblaze.com
 
2012-09-27 11:23:43 PM
Water? You mean, like, from the toilet?
 
2012-09-27 11:24:39 PM
I'm sure it did -- right before politician-run energy companies raped it dry, destroyed the atmosphere, and destroyed the entire planet.
 
2012-09-27 11:27:03 PM
Hey, look what else they found!

img3.imageshack.us

/stop calling jeebus a zombie
//he was a martian
 
2012-09-27 11:27:14 PM
When it comes to destroying life, we humans are #1

Yeah, because nothing died out before humans came along... Remember the first time humans rode on dinosaurs?


Dumbass
 
2012-09-27 11:29:00 PM
The science that will be accomplished by the robot will run circles around the accomplishments of the International Space System.

For most space exploration tasks in the foreseeable future, robots > humans.
 
2012-09-27 11:29:10 PM

Marcus Aurelius: Richard Saunders: Just because it's a fluid, does not mean it's water...

/or did I not get the memo?

Other solvents tend not to wear rock in the same fashion. Mars rock is composed from a lot of silicon and lesser basalts than Earth, but water erosion is distinct from streams of, say, liquid methane. Water is polar; it hydrates silica minerals, and has an astonishing vapor pressure to atomic weight ratio.

Meanwhile the chances of Mars getting cold enough to liquefy methane in volume and rain it from the sky in sufficient quantities to erode rock is between slim and none.


well sure. but what if it wasn't liquid methane but rather iced tea? didn't think of that, did ya?
 
2012-09-27 11:30:23 PM
You're right, no human being would stack books like this.
 
2012-09-27 11:30:29 PM

Xaxor: It's NASA, not Nasa, though I am probably guilty of it too.


It can be either. It depends entirely upon the style guidelines of whatever organization is publishing the material or the personal preference of the copy editor. Maybe you should make sure you actually know what you're talking about before you get all preachy.

Pronunciation-dependent style
At the copyediting end of the publishing industry, where the aforementioned distinction between acronyms (pronounced as a word) and initialisms (pronounced as a series of letters) is usually maintained, some publishers choose to use cap/lowercase (c/lc) styling for acronyms, reserving all-caps styling for initialisms. Thus Nato and Aids (c/lc), but USA and FBI (caps). For example, this is the style used in The Guardian,[41] and BBC News typically edits to this style (though its official style guide, dating from 2003, still recommends all-caps [42]). The logic of this style is that the pronunciation is reflected graphically by the capitalization scheme.
Some style manuals also base the letters' case on their number. The New York Times, for example, keeps NATO in all capitals (while several guides in the British press may render it Nato), but uses lower case in Unicef (from "United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund") because it is more than four letters, and to style it in caps might look ungainly (flirting with the appearance of "shouting capitals").
 
2012-09-27 11:30:45 PM
So THAT'S where Jesus put all the water left over from the flood!
 
2012-09-27 11:31:21 PM

Marcus Aurelius: fusillade762: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

I think the theory is that Mars lost its magnetic field and solar radiation fried the place. Any scienticians feel free to correct me if I'm off base.

True. The atmosphere, even of Earth, needs a constant refresh of gasses to replenish the losses to space and the solar wind. Having a magnetic field is crucial to not having your gas shield stripped away.

Now pass me the sunblock. And don't forget to do the tops of your ears - you'll thank me when you're 90.


If I recall the Science Channel thingus I saw a while back, the composition of Mar's core was insufficiently dense to sustain proper magnetic poles. Instead it may have have multiple smaller, wandering magnetic poles. Eventually, the atmosphere and the water held therein burned off in the solar winds - dead planet.
 
2012-09-27 11:32:01 PM
Yeah, the Alien Brain was trying to tell me something about that when I took it out with the Blaster Launcher.

lparchive.org
 
2012-09-27 11:33:42 PM
Fast moving water ?
 
2012-09-27 11:34:13 PM

brianbankerus: fusillade762: Ambivalence: So what happened to it?

I think the theory is that Mars lost its magnetic field and solar radiation fried the place. Any scienticians feel free to correct me if I'm off base.

I'm not a scientician, but I do have an internet degree in doctorology.


Actually it's more like Mars never really had one worth mentioning. Nor does it have much gravity. So the atmosphere escapes, temperature drops and thus liquids can't survive on the surface any more.
 
2012-09-27 11:35:40 PM

Lsherm: markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..

Trilobites look pretty advanced, all things considered. I'd settle for fossilized bacteria, if the rover can detect it.


The problem being that finding life, or fossil life, would set a mandate for a manned mission to study one of the most revolutionary discoveries in the history of mankind.
I'm going to play the conspiracy thoery card and say that no scientist or politican with a fiefdom to protect wants their hands tied like that.

Whatever piece of equipment disovers anything will be declared faulty and the results inconclusive.
 
2012-09-27 11:35:43 PM
has anyone actually googled my penis shrank ?
 
2012-09-27 11:35:59 PM
Pretty much Mission To Mars covers where the water went.
Big farking Rock, massive atmosphere exodus and the water dissipates into space.

/causing life on earth
//Taa Daa
 
2012-09-27 11:37:16 PM

mudpants: Fast moving water ?


It's an old river bed.
 
2012-09-27 11:37:21 PM
yeah, plenty of water -- just don't drink any.

dvdmedia.ign.com
 
2012-09-27 11:38:11 PM

mudpants: has anyone actually googled my penis shrank ?


We're all very sorry for your loss and society's gain.
 
2012-09-27 11:39:13 PM

doglover: mudpants: Fast moving water ?

It's an old river bed.


You have taken euphamisms out of the parkkk
 
2012-09-27 11:40:55 PM

cman: COULD HAVE, but unlikely.


Bacteria, while not particularly interesting, are still technically life. Damn things can live anywhere.
 
2012-09-27 11:41:04 PM
Oh if I only speek english
 
2012-09-27 11:42:04 PM

soosh: Marcus Aurelius: Richard Saunders: Just because it's a fluid, does not mean it's water...

/or did I not get the memo?

Other solvents tend not to wear rock in the same fashion. Mars rock is composed from a lot of silicon and lesser basalts than Earth, but water erosion is distinct from streams of, say, liquid methane. Water is polar; it hydrates silica minerals, and has an astonishing vapor pressure to atomic weight ratio.

Meanwhile the chances of Mars getting cold enough to liquefy methane in volume and rain it from the sky in sufficient quantities to erode rock is between slim and none.

well sure. but what if it wasn't liquid methane but rather iced tea? didn't think of that, did ya?


That would explain the red color, no doubt. But given the convenience stores wars we have on this planet between Wawa and 7-11 and the Gook-n-Go, I think we can assume that Taco Bell won the war on that planet.

Sad, really.
 
2012-09-27 11:42:33 PM
because water is the only liquid in the universe
 
2012-09-27 11:42:56 PM

markie_farkie: I bet we stumble across some kind of primitive trilobite-like fossil before too long.

Think of the implications..


That means another planet I'll never get to go fishing on. :(
 
2012-09-27 11:44:30 PM

Marcus Aurelius: soosh: Marcus Aurelius: Richard Saunders: Just because it's a fluid, does not mean it's water...

/or did I not get the memo?

Other solvents tend not to wear rock in the same fashion. Mars rock is composed from a lot of silicon and lesser basalts than Earth, but water erosion is distinct from streams of, say, liquid methane. Water is polar; it hydrates silica minerals, and has an astonishing vapor pressure to atomic weight ratio.

Meanwhile the chances of Mars getting cold enough to liquefy methane in volume and rain it from the sky in sufficient quantities to erode rock is between slim and none.

well sure. but what if it wasn't liquid methane but rather iced tea? didn't think of that, did ya?

That would explain the red color, no doubt. But given the convenience stores wars we have on this planet between Wawa and 7-11 and the Gook-n-Go, I think we can assume that Taco Bell won the war on that planet.

Sad, really.


are you gay cause I have a couson that't gaay. and he is really cute and stuff.
 
2012-09-27 11:44:40 PM

mudpants: Fast moving water ?


Slow-moving brain?
 
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