If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Wired)   Amateur astronomer maps Jupiter's moon Ganymede in amazing detail   (wired.com) divider line 19
    More: Interesting, Ganymede, amateur astronomers, Scott Ian, maps Jupiter, Fangoria, Wired Science, Very Large Telescope, Keck Observatory  
•       •       •

4521 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Sep 2012 at 8:27 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-09-27 08:41:22 PM
But what about girls, young man??
 
2012-09-27 08:53:20 PM
All these worlds are yours except Europa. Attempt no landing there.
 
2012-09-27 08:58:51 PM
You know, the planets and their moons which orbit the earth are really amazing.
 
2012-09-27 09:10:43 PM

born_yesterday: You know, the planets and their moons which orbit the earth are really amazing.


Copernicus would like to see you.
 
2012-09-27 09:31:48 PM
science.nasa.gov
 
2012-09-27 09:58:38 PM
neatnik2009.files.wordpress.com 

Damn that is detailed.
 
2012-09-27 10:29:57 PM
Still waiting for pics of Uranus' moon.

/obvious
 
2012-09-27 10:35:29 PM

Balchinian: Still waiting for pics of Uranus' moon.

/obvious


Have you seen the rings around Uranus?
 
2012-09-27 10:38:33 PM

HillbillyBubba: Balchinian: Still waiting for pics of Uranus' moon.

/obvious

Have you seen the rings around Uranus?


Does Uranus have sufficient mass for its self-gravity to overcome rigid body forces so that it assumes a hydrostatic equilibrium (nearly round) shape?
 
2012-09-27 10:39:09 PM
Another guy who does spectacular planetary astrophotography with off-the-shelf equipment.

www.damianpeach.com

His movie of Jupiter's rotation is as good as anything returned by the Pioneer probes on their Jupiter flybys.
 
2012-09-27 11:15:21 PM
Many years ago, I posted a CSB story on fark about how, as a kid, I sent off requests to JPL for educational materials about the Voyager missions. From JPL, I got fat packets of missions sheets, info, and 8X10 lithographs of the fly-bys. A farker posted that in that thread his dad was a JPL engineer at the time, probably one of the guys who sent those out on their own dime.

/CSBcsb
 
2012-09-27 11:15:29 PM
Such an extensive network of canali!
And the aerodromes outside the cities are so numerous and large!
 
2012-09-28 01:21:27 AM

vicejay: Many years ago, I posted a CSB story on fark about how, as a kid, I sent off requests to JPL for educational materials about the Voyager missions. From JPL, I got fat packets of missions sheets, info, and 8X10 lithographs of the fly-bys. A farker posted that in that thread his dad was a JPL engineer at the time, probably one of the guys who sent those out on their own dime.

/CSBcsb


That so farking rocks!
 
2012-09-28 03:38:40 AM
It's great that "citizen scientists" can make so many useful and original contributions to science, but it seems very ironic that astronomy, which deals with the most distant objects, is one of the sciences where the simplest equipment and the most numerous amateurs can really do a lot of important work.

The busy work of science gets very little credit--thousands of women who took science in the early XXth century were put to drudge work scanning photographic plates. Today, amateurs can still do this but automation would make good sense, freeing amateurs to do more important work requiring human intelligence. With enough equipment, the bulk of science could be done by volunteers with simple equipment and computers, like the various "screensaver" down-time programs that run on millions of computers around the world, including mine.

There's simply so much stuff out there, and the big scientific equipment is so expensive and rare, that many scientists simply haven't got time or resources to do science of this sort. Small automated telescopes would probably do a gazillion times as much work as one super observatory--and because you are basically counting photons that come from far away, they could be networked into giant planet-wide or even solar-system wide telescopes that target stars, planets and lesser objects one by one while gathering information about many parts of the sky. The main ingredient is the software that guides the telescopes and the software that combines the data with sufficient accuracy to combine hours or years of data with extraordinary accuracy.

The same is true of meteorology, climate science, etc. The masses can do the work with very little equipment or effort, building up accurate data one photon or pixel at a time, so to speak.

We have only begun to scratch the surface of what can be done by crowd-sourcing and networks of micro-sensors and micro-projects multiplied by the billions of humans on Earth with a bit of time on their hands.

Another example besides these science projects, is genealogy. One of the great sources I use is a website called automatedgenealogy.ca, where volunteers have been transcribing and correcting the Census records of Canadian provincial and federal Censuses. You can even feed-back corrections when you notice that a name has been misread. All you need is a bit of knowledge of your family and the ability to read bad handwriting and to guess what the Census taker heard or misremembered.

One pixel can make a difference in astronomy, where pixels are the size of stars and planets.

If you were able to watch one pixel of the sky for long enough, with enough accuracy, you could map a planet millions or billions of years away one photon at a time. Of course, this means compensating for all kinds of things, including the smallest and largest movements of the Earth, the stars, galaxies, etc., but it is possible in theory and accomplished by fellows like the guy in this article.

In a way, Leibnitz was right and the world is composed of monads that contain a whole image of the rest of the world in themselves (like human minds, but also like holographs). It's amazing how big and small things are interconnected.
 
2012-09-28 10:15:10 AM
Agreed! I caught a bug to make a telescope a few months ago, and one of the better home brewed mirror was made buy a guy who is becoming the leading cataloger of neo objects. Neat that people with a hobby can contribute in meaningful ways to the world's knowledge.
 
2012-09-28 12:43:24 PM

GypsyJoker: Another guy who does spectacular planetary astrophotography with off-the-shelf equipment.

[www.damianpeach.com image 850x711]

His movie of Jupiter's rotation is as good as anything returned by the Pioneer probes on their Jupiter flybys.


Why is the Great Red Spot in the northern hemisphere?
 
2012-09-28 01:34:38 PM

Riotboy: GypsyJoker: Another guy who does spectacular planetary astrophotography with off-the-shelf equipment.

[www.damianpeach.com image 850x711]

His movie of Jupiter's rotation is as good as anything returned by the Pioneer probes on their Jupiter flybys.

Why is the Great Red Spot in the northern hemisphere?


North is often at the bottom in astrophotographs. Telescopes flip north and south (and, depending on the number of mirrors in the system, east and west), and many astrophotographers leave their images that way to match the eyepiece view.
 
2012-09-28 02:40:27 PM

GypsyJoker: Riotboy: GypsyJoker: Another guy who does spectacular planetary astrophotography with off-the-shelf equipment.

[www.damianpeach.com image 850x711]

His movie of Jupiter's rotation is as good as anything returned by the Pioneer probes on their Jupiter flybys.

Why is the Great Red Spot in the northern hemisphere?

North is often at the bottom in astrophotographs. Telescopes flip north and south (and, depending on the number of mirrors in the system, east and west), and many astrophotographers leave their images that way to match the eyepiece view.


GypsyJoker: Riotboy: GypsyJoker: Another guy who does spectacular planetary astrophotography with off-the-shelf equipment.

[www.damianpeach.com image 850x711]

His movie of Jupiter's rotation is as good as anything returned by the Pioneer probes on their Jupiter flybys.

Why is the Great Red Spot in the northern hemisphere?

North is often at the bottom in astrophotographs. Telescopes flip north and south (and, depending on the number of mirrors in the system, east and west), and many astrophotographers leave their images that way to match the eyepiece view.


I see said the blind man.

/thanks!
 
2012-09-30 09:04:40 AM
I hear the Lobsters from there have great shelf life.
 
Displayed 19 of 19 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report