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(Koldcast TV)   Everyone knows that shipping containers might be the next living space. But what's surprising is how good they can be made to look   (blog.koldcast.tv) divider line 54
    More: Cool, composting toilet, bucket list, vacation homes, adaptability, Aquarius, American Dream, containers, building materials  
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7948 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Sep 2012 at 3:31 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 12:34:46 PM
How about no.

I'd rather live in one of those shoebox Tokyo apartments than an old shipping container, and I've been called a "farking hipster" before.
 
2012-09-27 01:05:46 PM
At some point these stop being shipping containers and start being regular ol' modular housing.
 
2012-09-27 01:26:52 PM

meat0918: How about no.

I'd rather live in one of those shoebox Tokyo apartments than an old shipping container, and I've been called a "farking hipster" before.


I got "hipster Doofus" from some craycray I met briefly at an online dating site.
After one email.
Cray cray lives on those sites.
 
2012-09-27 01:28:11 PM
I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.
 
2012-09-27 01:30:05 PM
Home is where you hang your hat. I've lived in worse.
 
2012-09-27 01:31:35 PM

gopher321: Home is where you hang your hat poop most comfortably. I've lived in worse.


FTFY
 
2012-09-27 01:31:43 PM
the modern shipping container remains the linchpin of the world's global distribution network. Everything from Chinese toys, textiles from India, grain from America, and German cars to Japanese electronics cross our great oceans in them. However, steel shipping containers outlive their usefulness as cargo carriers within five years

Interesting. I bet whoever is manufacturing these things is making a killing.
 
2012-09-27 01:49:03 PM
Just make sure your air pipe doesn't get crimped. 

i522.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-27 02:02:22 PM

scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.


I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.
 
2012-09-27 02:35:12 PM

tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.


You have to reinforce the walls. Shipping containers are very strong vertically, but they're not made to withstand pressure on the sides like what being buried would do. Also, you'd have to do some serious rust prevention.

There is a pretty big secondary market for used shipping containers, of all sizes and configurations.
 
2012-09-27 02:40:36 PM

scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.


Yep, here in tornado land, with some waterproofing/rustproofing, it might make a decent sized emergency tornado zombie shelter.
 
2012-09-27 02:43:44 PM
I see that someone recently watched chaos;head.
 
2012-09-27 02:51:38 PM

pudding7: tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.

You have to reinforce the walls. Shipping containers are very strong vertically, but they're not made to withstand pressure on the sides like what being buried would do. Also, you'd have to do some serious rust prevention.

There is a pretty big secondary market for used shipping containers, of all sizes and configurations.


H beams 3/4 of the way around in a couple of spots would probably do it. And I was thinking that Rhino lining stuff they use on pickup boxes.
 
2012-09-27 03:17:00 PM

gopher321: the modern shipping container remains the linchpin of the world's global distribution network. Everything from Chinese toys, textiles from India, grain from America, and German cars to Japanese electronics cross our great oceans in them. However, steel shipping containers outlive their usefulness as cargo carriers within five years

Interesting. I bet whoever is manufacturing these things is making a killing.


It's cheaper to make new ones than ship empty ones back to their origin point to re-use.
 
2012-09-27 03:19:18 PM
Dig out a hillside, bury a six-pack of those things with one end exposed, and turn it into a great semi-underground home.
 
2012-09-27 03:33:59 PM
Given that it would be bigger with better climate controls than my last apartment, where do I sign up?
 
2012-09-27 03:40:03 PM

give me doughnuts: It's cheaper to make new ones than ship empty ones back to their origin point to re-use.


Uhhhh what? Are we only allowed to ship things one-way these days?
 
2012-09-27 03:42:34 PM

basemetal: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

Yep, here in tornado land, with some waterproofing/rustproofing, it might make a decent sized emergency tornado zombie shelter.


My mind is boggling at the thought of a "tornado zombie."

Band name?
Best drink ever?
Super-Villain?

The possibilities are nigh endless.
 
2012-09-27 04:03:01 PM
Been there, done that.

Link
 
2012-09-27 04:04:46 PM

Grither: give me doughnuts: It's cheaper to make new ones than ship empty ones back to their origin point to re-use.

Uhhhh what? Are we only allowed to ship things one-way these days?


Oh, no, you can ship things both ways.

However, the amount of material by sheer volume that is being shipped from China to the US is far far greater than what is shipped from the US to China, by an incredible amount.

Maybe cause cheap toys and electronics have a decent amount of volume, while jobs and money can take considerably less so.

/ba-dum-ching
 
2012-09-27 04:14:03 PM

pudding7: tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.

You have to reinforce the walls. Shipping containers are very strong vertically, but they're not made to withstand pressure on the sides like what being buried would do. Also, you'd have to do some serious rust prevention.

There is a pretty big secondary market for used shipping containers, of all sizes and configurations.


Why would burying it put pressure on the sides? Provided of course you buried it rightside up.
 
2012-09-27 04:19:16 PM
"...textiles from India, grain from America, and German cars..."

Maybe one off examples but I'm pretty sure they don't transport new cars from the manufacturer to the US that way. It would be hugely inefficient. Car ships are designed so they can drive the cars on and off, and they stack them inches apart.
 
2012-09-27 04:20:24 PM

Magnanimous_J: Why would burying it put pressure on the sides? Provided of course you buried it rightside up.


because the soil would be pushing against the walls
 
2012-09-27 04:25:39 PM
Containers? Pfft.... amateurs.

Man living in N.Y. tunnel
 
2012-09-27 04:31:38 PM
Only one or two of those could be categorized as 'nice', and that was because of locationlocationlocation, and not the container itself.

LLL
image.static01.koldcast.tv
image.static01.koldcast.tv

Also
image.static01.koldcast.tvimages.cryhavok.org
 
2012-09-27 04:33:42 PM
Now, they're gaining increasing recognition for their durability, adaptability, light weight, and ease of stacking, spurring a recycling trend that has resulted in shipping container sculpture, homes, hotels, museums and more.

"Now"? The "im-going-to-make-a-building-out-of-containers" idea was already cliche in architecture school nearly two decades ago.

/jesus,wait. Was that two decades ago???
//fark im old
 
2012-09-27 04:40:56 PM

Magnanimous_J: pudding7: tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.

You have to reinforce the walls. Shipping containers are very strong vertically, but they're not made to withstand pressure on the sides like what being buried would do. Also, you'd have to do some serious rust prevention.

There is a pretty big secondary market for used shipping containers, of all sizes and configurations.

Why would burying it put pressure on the sides? Provided of course you buried it rightside up.


Water.
 
2012-09-27 04:50:22 PM

pudding7: tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.

You have to reinforce the walls. Shipping containers are very strong vertically, but they're not made to withstand pressure on the sides like what being buried would do. Also, you'd have to do some serious rust prevention.

There is a pretty big secondary market for used shipping containers, of all sizes and configurations.


Yes, they are very strong on the edges and corners, but have terrible side/top strength. I think the ceilings will bow if you walk on them. They're not suitable for burying without a lot of structural work and rust proofing, unfortunately.
 
2012-09-27 04:58:42 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
Been there, done that.
 
2012-09-27 05:58:07 PM

Grither: give me doughnuts: It's cheaper to make new ones than ship empty ones back to their origin point to re-use.

Uhhhh what? Are we only allowed to ship things one-way these days?


Well, it's expensive to ship anything, and empty containers don't generate revenue at the other end. Do the math. If we built stuff to fill them them with, it would make sense, but we mostly don't anymore. Anyway, steel is plentiful and reusable, and used containers have many uses. A friend of mine parked one at a rental lot, and uses it as a massive private storage locker.

One idea I've had for years is to take a shorty, fix it up as a little truck diner, and put it on a short flatbed truck. Yes, it's a nausating hipster notion, but just think, of the money you could make. The idea started when I lived in Providence, where there are plenty of these containers. (Someone even built an entire office building out of them there.) My original concept was to see how ugly a truck diner could be, and then that dovetailed with a notion for reuse and reduced waste, blah blah crunchy hippy shiat blah blah. I was also inspired by a tour of PIPS' Urban Agriculture Unit, a greenhouse built in an old shipping container. I've lost interest in it at this point, but I hope someone does something like it someday.
 
2012-09-27 05:58:56 PM
I oddly would love to have a couple of them slapped together, or just one of the larger ones.

But I like small living spaces much more than large ones. I mean, reallistically, I occupy 2 rooms regularly; the bedroom for sleep, and the other room for TV/reading/computer/eating/etc.

Clearly I'm single, no kids, etc.
 
2012-09-27 06:05:38 PM

Magnanimous_J: pudding7: tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.

You have to reinforce the walls. Shipping containers are very strong vertically, but they're not made to withstand pressure on the sides like what being buried would do. Also, you'd have to do some serious rust prevention.

There is a pretty big secondary market for used shipping containers, of all sizes and configurations.

Why would burying it put pressure on the sides? Provided of course you buried it rightside up.


What we call 'ground' is really just piled up dirt. The dirt presses sideways as well as down, but fills the space provided. If you make a pile of sand or salt or sugar, you can see the same thing: the pile pushes outwards as well as down. We mostly never think of these forces, but they're there; they're just in equilibrium in most places most of the time.

When you dig into the ground, you disrupt that equilibrium, and if you dig deep enough, the lateral forces will eventually lead to wall failure, a kind of slope failure. That's why, when you see workmen digging deep trenches, they brace them with steel wall modules that are braced primarily along the lateral axis, against wall failure. Otherwise, the trenches would be in danger of collapse from these lateral forces. Anything sunk into the ground needs to be strong enough to resist this.

A shipping container is tall enough that if it was sunk into the ground, it would also have to be reinforced against lateral pressure, since it's not designed for that originally.
 
2012-09-27 06:11:50 PM

tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.


Seconded. Need to figure out ventilation and waste removal, but the rest of it can be done very cheaply
 
2012-09-27 06:21:44 PM
i1172.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-27 06:45:28 PM
Or the new DYING space!
Heyo images1.wikia.nocookie.net

//dint no they wuz gurls in that can
 
2012-09-27 07:50:24 PM
Dear beloved nitwits:

First you have to buy the land and get easement/access to it, plus water and electricity feeds.

Yes, stupid cat is stating the obvious.

Apologies for offense.
 
2012-09-27 07:54:14 PM
Is this where Dr. Rosen lives?..........
 
2012-09-27 07:57:58 PM
aren't they made of thick steel or something? it would be like living in a giant EMP-shielded faraday cage. ... this is kinda a wet dream a' mine.
 
2012-09-27 08:02:44 PM

utah dude: aren't they made of thick steel or something? it would be like living in a giant EMP-shielded faraday cage. ... this is kinda a wet dream a' mine.


and you could bury it kinda, using concrete that lead shot is mixed into for additional strength and some radiation absorption ... dude, that would be so rhad. i would love sleeping in that.
 
2012-09-27 08:14:55 PM
ypcommando.com
 
2012-09-27 08:21:05 PM

robbiex0r: pudding7: tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.

You have to reinforce the walls. Shipping containers are very strong vertically, but they're not made to withstand pressure on the sides like what being buried would do. Also, you'd have to do some serious rust prevention.

There is a pretty big secondary market for used shipping containers, of all sizes and configurations.

Yes, they are very strong on the edges and corners, but have terrible side/top strength. I think the ceilings will bow if you walk on them. They're not suitable for burying without a lot of structural work and rust proofing, unfortunately.


There not suitable for much other than stacking vertically as well. The strength is in the 4 corner columns and the sides act as a webbing between the top and bottom rails. If you try to take out a side like you would between 2 containers side by side you'd have to reinforce both the top and bottom beam or else it would deflect. Cutting small holes for windows is OK but anything more will weaken it too much. The floors also contain some very nasty chemicals to prevent bug problems. The roof will collapse and drag in the sides with as little as 1ft of snow. Plain stacks like you'd see in a port are fine, but the elaborately stacked designs require lots of reinforcing.
 
2012-09-27 08:26:22 PM

pudding7: tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.

You have to reinforce the walls. Shipping containers are very strong vertically, but they're not made to withstand pressure on the sides like what being buried would do. Also, you'd have to do some serious rust prevention.



They're normally made of Corten Steel (also called weathering steel). Unlike most steels that flake when it oxidizes it forms a protective layer, similar to aluminum. It doesn't need corrosion protection unless you're putting it in an extreme environment, like exposing it to salt water spray.

Earth pressure is about 60 pounds per foot depth, so at ~10 feet there would be a pretty high load on the sides. You could reduce this by either backfilling with coarse gravel or otherwise lay geotectile layers every foot or so, which would keep the earth pressure to about 60 pounds/foot across the depth.

Provided you're not below the water table, which would raise lateral pressures and if it's high enough could start to push the container out of the ground and cause some waterproofing issues. The buoyancy could be fixed by adding weight to the top when you bury it, waterproofing could be trickier without some specialized sealant or waterproofing system on the entire exterior.
 
2012-09-27 08:45:13 PM
[enjoying the thoughts going on here]
 
2012-09-27 08:53:19 PM

The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: pudding7: tin_man: scottydoesntknow: I wouldn't live in one. I would bury one in my backyard and turn it into a cool underground shelter. Maybe put one of those old-school bomb shelter hatches on it.

I don't know how often you have great ideas, but you just had one.

You have to reinforce the walls. Shipping containers are very strong vertically, but they're not made to withstand pressure on the sides like what being buried would do. Also, you'd have to do some serious rust prevention.



They're normally made of Corten Steel (also called weathering steel). Unlike most steels that flake when it oxidizes it forms a protective layer, similar to aluminum. It doesn't need corrosion protection unless you're putting it in an extreme environment, like exposing it to salt water spray.

Earth pressure is about 60 pounds per foot depth, so at ~10 feet there would be a pretty high load on the sides. You could reduce this by either backfilling with coarse gravel or otherwise lay geotectile layers every foot or so, which would keep the earth pressure to about 60 pounds/foot across the depth.

Provided you're not below the water table, which would raise lateral pressures and if it's high enough could start to push the container out of the ground and cause some waterproofing issues. The buoyancy could be fixed by adding weight to the top when you bury it, waterproofing could be trickier without some specialized sealant or waterproofing system on the entire exterior.


A shipping container? Exposed to saltwater spray? What are the chances? One in a million!


/A wave hit it.
//And the front fell off.
 
2012-09-27 09:29:05 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Grither: give me doughnuts: It's cheaper to make new ones than ship empty ones back to their origin point to re-use.

Uhhhh what? Are we only allowed to ship things one-way these days?

Well, it's expensive to ship anything, and empty containers don't generate revenue at the other end. Do the math. If we built stuff to fill them them with, it would make sense, but we mostly don't anymore. Anyway, steel is plentiful and reusable, and used containers have many uses. A friend of mine parked one at a rental lot, and uses it as a massive private storage locker.

One idea I've had for years is to take a shorty, fix it up as a little truck diner, and put it on a short flatbed truck. Yes, it's a nausating hipster notion, but just think, of the money you could make. The idea started when I lived in Providence, where there are plenty of these containers. (Someone even built an entire office building out of them there.) My original concept was to see how ugly a truck diner could be, and then that dovetailed with a notion for reuse and reduced waste, blah blah crunchy hippy shiat blah blah. I was also inspired by a tour of PIPS' Urban Agriculture Unit, a greenhouse built in an old shipping container. I've lost interest in it at this point, but I hope someone does something like it someday.


how about a few restauraunts Link

or as part of one

Link

Link
 
2012-09-27 09:56:38 PM
If you were somebody that moved around a lot for your job, the concept of having a fold-out home made out of a shipping container is something that might be worth looking into.

Look at high end mobile homes, with some planning to you probably do something similar and have a place that could travel with you.
 
2012-09-27 10:04:16 PM
If Khan's wife hadn't died on Ceti Alpha V she could have got those cargo carriers decorated better.
 
2012-09-27 10:52:56 PM
I like designs with shipping containers. I think that several combined with above and below earth construction could recycle heat well enough to be efficient. Add geothermal as well as solar and wind, cisterns and grey water reuse and you could live cheap.
 
2012-09-28 12:46:22 AM

rev. dave: I like designs with shipping containers. I think that several combined with above and below earth construction could recycle heat well enough to be efficient. Add geothermal as well as solar and wind, cisterns and grey water reuse and you could live cheap.


A similar sort of structure - higher tech than a shipping container but a similar living area. In DC in mid summer the solar powered AC was able to keep the inside cool as long as you didn't have the door open too long. If you hooked it up to a geothermal system I'd imaging it would coast through most high demand energy situations.

IIRC the guy in charge of the program reckoned it would cost about $70k
 
2012-09-28 12:47:34 AM

The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: rev. dave: I like designs with shipping containers. I think that several combined with above and below earth construction could recycle heat well enough to be efficient. Add geothermal as well as solar and wind, cisterns and grey water reuse and you could live cheap.

A similar sort of structure - higher tech than a shipping container but a similar living area. In DC in mid summer the solar powered AC was able to keep the inside cool as long as you didn't have the door open too long. If you hooked it up to a geothermal system I'd imaging it would coast through most high demand energy situations.

IIRC the guy in charge of the program reckoned it would cost about $70k



And the link... sorry about the double post folks.

Link
 
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