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(BBC)   Four out of 10 UK pupils fail new phonics test, according to the Worcestershire Institute   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 89
    More: Followup, Worcestershire Institute, official statistics, Department for Education, school meal, Year One, eggs  
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2178 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2012 at 1:15 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 10:01:39 AM
This headline is FULL of win

/If you live in England or New England in the USA, you would get the headline
 
2012-09-27 10:05:32 AM
In fairness, their monkey arrived in the box dead.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-09-27 10:22:22 AM

cman: This headline is FULL of win

/If you live in England or New England in the USA, you would get the headline


It certainly explains why.
 
2012-09-27 10:24:05 AM

vpb: cman: This headline is FULL of win

/If you live in England or New England in the USA, you would get the headline

It certainly explains why.


If you dont get it, Worcestershire is not pronounced anything close to how it is written. It actually sounds like "rooster" only with a W instead of an R
 
2012-09-27 10:29:03 AM

cman: vpb: cman: This headline is FULL of win

/If you live in England or New England in the USA, you would get the headline

It certainly explains why.

If you dont get it, Worcestershire is not pronounced anything close to how it is written. It actually sounds like "rooster" only with a W instead of an R


Or Worcester rather. I dont spell it oft so I usually only copy-pasta it when I write it.
 
2012-09-27 10:29:34 AM
Saucy!
 
2012-09-27 10:53:53 AM
Damn Romans and their icky sauce made from dead fishies. Now it even has its own institute.
 
2012-09-27 11:07:09 AM
i2.ytimg.com

It's not pronounced Wooster-cester-shister-shyster-schuster-shuster-shister-shire?
 
2012-09-27 11:11:58 AM
Being a human that can pass a phonics test based on the English language is akin to being a dog that can pass a calculus test. It's incredibly impressive if you manage it, but no one really thinks you should be able to.
 
2012-09-27 11:37:34 AM

cman: cman: vpb: cman: This headline is FULL of win

/If you live in England or New England in the USA, you would get the headline

It certainly explains why.

If you dont get it, Worcestershire is not pronounced anything close to how it is written. It actually sounds like "rooster" only with a W instead of an R

Or Worcester rather. I dont spell it oft so I usually only copy-pasta it when I write it.


Repeat after the native: Wuh-stah. Wuhstah. Worcester.
 
2012-09-27 11:52:28 AM

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: cman: cman: vpb: cman: This headline is FULL of win

/If you live in England or New England in the USA, you would get the headline

It certainly explains why.

If you dont get it, Worcestershire is not pronounced anything close to how it is written. It actually sounds like "rooster" only with a W instead of an R

Or Worcester rather. I dont spell it oft so I usually only copy-pasta it when I write it.

Repeat after the native: Wuh-stah. Wuhstah. Worcester.


I may be from New England, but General American is what I speak, none of that Mainer/Mass crap
 
2012-09-27 01:13:32 PM
Wore-sess-ter-sure.

Is that so hard?
 
2012-09-27 01:19:23 PM

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Repeat after the native: Wuh-stah. Wuhstah. Worcester.


This. The first syllable sounds similar to "whoosh". The second syllable is either "stir" or "stah", depending upon your distance from Boston.
 
2012-09-27 01:20:14 PM
And the UK pronounces it In-sta-chew-te
 
2012-09-27 01:20:59 PM
WHORE-SISTER-PERSPIRE SAUCE...there...that wasn't so hard.
 
2012-09-27 01:21:35 PM
It's pronounced Wooster-shire, folks.

I grew up in a time when Phonics was the rage. I remember being taught it in grade 2. I found it completely idiotic. I honestly thought the teachers were brain damaged or something. I remember I asked my mother if I had been put in the "slow learners" class by mistake.
 
2012-09-27 01:26:01 PM
Having to read "Hypromethyldisulformidic corn gluten" isn't fair to children.
 
2012-09-27 01:28:20 PM
 
2012-09-27 01:29:05 PM
Ohhhh, you mean wer-shest-er sauce. Yeah, good stuff.
 
2012-09-27 01:33:07 PM

gopher321: Wore-sess-ter-sure.

Is that so hard?


Turrible. Try "wooster-shur"
Go to the libary and look it up.
 
2012-09-27 01:33:35 PM
Fetherstonhaugh for the win.
 
2012-09-27 01:35:12 PM

Ikahoshi: It's pronounced Wooster-shire, folks.

I grew up in a time when Phonics was the rage. I remember being taught it in grade 2. I found it completely idiotic. I honestly thought the teachers were brain damaged or something. I remember I asked my mother if I had been put in the "slow learners" class by mistake.


And this is why I don't trust the educational system. It's fad driven. Just because you send somebody to school for 4 or 5 years doesn't mean they understand how people learn. Kee-ryst, I remember open classrooms when I was a kid. You could just walk in and out. Fortunately that didn't last long.
 
2012-09-27 01:36:18 PM
It goes well with whore's divorce.
 
2012-09-27 01:36:38 PM

stonelotus: Worcestershire


That link hits the nail on the head why the Brits failed phonics.

Worcestershire -- on first glance, you'd think it'd be pronounced woar - chest - er - shy - er .... maybe even woar - sest - er - shy - er.

Nope. Wrong. It's pronounced wuh - stuh - sher.

Derbyshire -- same thing. You think it would be der - bee - shy - er.

Nope. der - buh - sher.
 
2012-09-27 01:37:18 PM
Were the tests held at Leicester Square?
 
2012-09-27 01:38:38 PM

brobdiggy: stonelotus: Worcestershire

Derbyshire -- same thing. You think it would be der - bee - shy - er.

Nope. der - buh - sher.


Derbyshire is pronounced Dar-Bee-Sher
 
2012-09-27 01:39:02 PM
www.theantiroom.com

Is surprised it was only 4 out of 10
 
2012-09-27 01:44:18 PM

brobdiggy: stonelotus: Worcestershire

That link hits the nail on the head why the Brits failed phonics.

Worcestershire -- on first glance, you'd think it'd be pronounced woar - chest - er - shy - er .... maybe even woar - sest - er - shy - er.

Nope. Wrong. It's pronounced wuh - stuh - sher.

Derbyshire -- same thing. You think it would be der - bee - shy - er.

Nope. der - buh - sher.


The problem lies with the fact that English writers refuse to keep up with the written to spoken word. English has changed SO MUCH since the Chancery Standard and yet we have many archaic things that clog up our language and cause confusion. For instance, we no longer pronounce the K and the GH in Knight. We lost both the Germanic KN and the Germanic Yogh (ch in German) but yet we keep writing it. Through and Thou both use the OU, but only the OU in Thou shifted whereas the OU in Through remained the original vowel sound. We use the old vowel sound in children, but Child shifted to a long I. Breakfast isnt close to the pronounciation and yet we still keep the spelling the same. Silent E's were once spoken and they provide nothing now (such in "have" and "gave". The Silent E shifted to mean a long A in some cases, but still...)
 
2012-09-27 01:46:43 PM
Wor-teshter...Woshta-tesh...Wooshter-tesh...fark it. Just pass the A1 Sauce.
 
2012-09-27 01:47:25 PM
Do you chart phonics on a phonograph?
 
2012-09-27 01:48:50 PM
Worchestershire Institute?

I assume you mean the Seamus Beauchamp Chomdeley Farqueharsen Institute of Irish Spelling, English Pronunciation and Scottish Toponymy?

They have American regional branches in Tucson, Versailles, and NOLA.
 
2012-09-27 01:49:32 PM
+1 headline win.

I was constantly reminded during Olympics coverage that nobody had taught NBC's people to even pronounce "Buckingham" correctly

/The stress is on the first syllable
//Don't even get me started on "Edinburgh"
 
2012-09-27 01:51:56 PM

cman: vpb: cman: This headline is FULL of win

/If you live in England or New England in the USA, you would get the headline

It certainly explains why.

If you dont get it, Worcestershire is not pronounced anything close to how it is written. It actually sounds like "rooster" only with a W instead of an R


Not quite. WUH-stah (WUH sounds like BOOK), WIS-tah, WUH-ster, or WIS-ter, depending on your neighborhood or little section of burbs.

/grew up in WUH-ster.
 
2012-09-27 01:52:35 PM

Valiente: Fetherstonhaugh for the win.


Fan-shaw.
I knew an ape that went by that name...
 
2012-09-27 01:54:46 PM
When I lived in Nashville I worked with a woman who was from Cookeville. She pronounced it CUH-vul.
 
2012-09-27 01:55:04 PM

Gulper Eel: [i2.ytimg.com image 320x180]

It's not pronounced Wooster-cester-shister-shyster-schuster-shuster-shister-shire?


theatreofreason.files.wordpress.com

...as you say, sir.
 
2012-09-27 01:55:54 PM
cman: brobdiggy: stonelotus: Worcestershire

That link hits the nail on the head why the Brits failed phonics.

Worcestershire -- on first glance, you'd think it'd be pronounced woar - chest - er - shy - er .... maybe even woar - sest - er - shy - er.

Nope. Wrong. It's pronounced wuh - stuh - sher.

Derbyshire -- same thing. You think it would be der - bee - shy - er.

Nope. der - buh - sher.

The problem lies with the fact that English writers refuse to keep up with the written to spoken word. English has changed SO MUCH since the Chancery Standard and yet we have many archaic things that clog up our language and cause confusion. For instance, we no longer pronounce the K and the GH in Knight. We lost both the Germanic KN and the Germanic Yogh (ch in German) but yet we keep writing it. Through and Thou both use the OU, but only the OU in Thou shifted whereas the OU in Through remained the original vowel sound. We use the old vowel sound in children, but Child shifted to a long I. Breakfast isnt close to the pronounciation and yet we still keep the spelling the same. Silent E's were once spoken and they provide nothing now (such in "have" and "gave". The Silent E shifted to mean a long A in some cases, but still...)


I like ghoti and chips.
 
2012-09-27 01:56:34 PM
Headline +1

thats a good one...
 
2012-09-27 01:58:03 PM
I was told there would be no readings...
 
2012-09-27 02:00:31 PM
Pronounce 'em
Bow - tied with ribbon;
Bow - bending at the waist to show deference;
Bow - launches an arrow;
Bow - front of a boat;
Bough - tree branch.

Sure, Easy.


Bough, Enough, Through - Why do these not all rhyme?


And don't lets start on the Their, There, They're, or the apostraphe.

Its v. It's. The apostrophe shows possession, except when it doesn't.

English is a pstupid language.
 
2012-09-27 02:01:21 PM
It's pronounced , "Throat Warbler Mangrove".
 
2012-09-27 02:05:26 PM

AngryJailhouseFistfark: Pronounce 'em
Bow - tied with ribbon;
Bow - bending at the waist to show deference;
Bow - launches an arrow;
Bow - front of a boat;
Bough - tree branch.

Sure, Easy.


Bough, Enough, Through - Why do these not all rhyme?


And don't lets start on the Their, There, They're, or the apostraphe.

Its v. It's. The apostrophe shows possession, except when it doesn't.

English is a pstupid language.


Thanks, but you're no George Carlin.
Come to think of it, George Carlin isn't any George Carlin anymore, either.
 
2012-09-27 02:06:10 PM

AngryJailhouseFistfark: or the apostraphe.


Sounds like a sex toy for librarians. The apostraphe-on.
 
2012-09-27 02:06:21 PM
All of the above is why I love German.
 
2012-09-27 02:09:27 PM
An American tourist once asked my brother which train was going to "Loo-ga ba-rooga". Apparently he wanted to go to Loughborough. (Luffbra). In Lie-sester-shire.
 
2012-09-27 02:09:33 PM
Now to TFA: THIS IS A GOOD TEST when used in combination with other reading assessments such as whole language and comprehension. This test is how we finally were able to diagnose my wicked smart (did I mention I grew up in Worcester) dyslexic kid. She's smart enough to have faked it up through the end of fourth grade. Her vocabulary has always been HUGE and she has always comprehended light years ahead of her grade. She looked at a word and got the beginning sound and the ending sound, but the middle of the word was basically a mish-mash jumble. So she'd flip through the brain-thesaurus to find a word that started and ended the same, and fit in context. We knew there was a problem as early as kindergarten, yet she would test on level whenever she was tested in the school. The problem was, as she got older, she encountered words on which her techniques didn't work. Sacagawea? Yeah, WTF? There isn't anything close. Also, as she began writing papers, she often couldn't get close enough to the word for spell check to kick out something that made sense.

Finally we had her te$ted independently by an Educational P$ychologi$t, and through the test in TFA, found out that she was decoding at below first grade level. Basically, she couldn't. So she got a giant helping of phonics along with her other reading. She will always be dyslexic, and never be a speller, but she's a voracious reader in Honors classes.

No, Phonics should not be the only method of reading instruction. It should be a part of a broader program. But these teachers need to STFU because this test is useful and has its place.
 
2012-09-27 02:09:41 PM

Galloping Galoshes: AngryJailhouseFistfark: or the apostraphe.

Sounds like a sex toy for librarians. The apostraphe-on.


Peg-on.
 
2012-09-27 02:10:36 PM
Let's not overlook the fact that they are expecting kids to read random new words at six years old. Britain's school system is archaic and broken. This is a great example.
 
2012-09-27 02:10:52 PM

brantgoose: Worchestershire Institute?

I assume you mean the Seamus Beauchamp Chomdeley Farqueharsen Institute of Irish Spelling, English Pronunciation and Scottish Toponymy?


President: Siobhan McGrath
 
2012-09-27 02:11:20 PM

Ikahoshi: It's pronounced Wooster-shire, folks.


Or, as I prefer, Woo-sti-sure
 
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