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(Phys Org2)   New black solar panels by Sharp cutting through the design clutter for buildings in Japan   (phys.org) divider line 21
    More: Spiffy, solar panels, Japan, conversion efficiency, heat shield, retrofits, highrises, solar energy, eco  
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3779 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Sep 2012 at 1:13 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 11:19:28 AM
This is what I love about Japan. No matter what they present, they always throw in a hot Asian chick to do the presenting.


Oh...and the solar panels are cool too.
 
2012-09-27 12:39:27 PM
Pretty cool idea, I am surprised they are only getting about 1/3 the efficiency of a normal panel though.. I'd think it could be at least 50%
 
2012-09-27 01:01:35 PM
I really really want solar panels. And not the 'sign the lease here' kind.

UberDave: This is what I love about Japan. No matter what they present, they always throw in a hot Asian chick to do the presenting.


Oh...and the solar panels are cool too.


Japan is amazing for a lot of things. And I find the hot Japanese chick part a requirement for me to believe in the viability of said product.
 
2012-09-27 01:27:55 PM

xsive: Pretty cool idea, I am surprised they are only getting about 1/3 the efficiency of a normal panel though.. I'd think it could be at least 50%


Even if it's less, if they can install them in places solar panels wouldn't be useful for previously then it sounds like a win to me.
 
2012-09-27 01:30:50 PM
Any word on cost? How about whether they would be legal for vehicles (due to level of tint)? For EVs this might be neat. Keep the car cooler (less AC when you start up) and provide a little bit of recharge.
 
2012-09-27 01:38:09 PM
FTFA "If we could retrofit every high-rise building's standard windows with this solar panel glass, buildings would each become its own power plant capable of generating at least a percentage of its energy needs," said environmental writer David Quilty.

WTF does that mean? 1%?
 
2012-09-27 01:51:30 PM
Iceman_Cometh: FTFA "If we could retrofit every high-rise building's standard windows with this solar panel glass, buildings would each become its own power plant capable of generating at least a percentage of its energy needs," said environmental writer David Quilty.

WTF does that mean? 1%?


Duhh. here let me rephrase that for you:

"If we could retrofit every high-rise building's standard windows with this solar panel glass, buildings would each become its own power plant capable of generating 0.00001% - 100% of its energy needs,"

How much more specific can it get?
 
2012-09-27 01:52:30 PM
It seems like they would have to be operable, but it doesn't look flexible. Heating and cooling buildings are the second and first most intense uses of power, with lighting in third. The panels would be helpful for the cooling, but the inefficiency won't help heating the building if it blocks too much light.
 
2012-09-27 01:52:52 PM

xsive: Pretty cool idea, I am surprised they are only getting about 1/3 the efficiency of a normal panel though.. I'd think it could be at least 50%


article states "less than 20%"...

Is this yet another troll innovation that i have come to expect from someone of the totalfark denomination?
 
2012-09-27 02:09:12 PM

Iceman_Cometh: FTFA "If we could retrofit every high-rise building's standard windows with this solar panel glass, buildings would each become its own power plant capable of generating at least a percentage of its energy needs," said environmental writer David Quilty.

WTF does that mean? 1%?


Meaning a portion of (amounts will vary), but not its full load.

mongbiohazard: xsive: Pretty cool idea, I am surprised they are only getting about 1/3 the efficiency of a normal panel though.. I'd think it could be at least 50%

Even if it's less, if they can install them in places solar panels wouldn't be useful for previously then it sounds like a win to me.


Pretty much. If you can start having collection tech integrated with more materials and components, you can be less efficient, and typically, less efficient means lower cost in large-scale production levels.
 
2012-09-27 02:18:44 PM

GiantPeon: xsive: Pretty cool idea, I am surprised they are only getting about 1/3 the efficiency of a normal panel though.. I'd think it could be at least 50%

article states "less than 20%"...

Is this yet another troll innovation that i have come to expect from someone of the totalfark denomination?


article:
A reaction to the announcement outside Sharp has been one of interest but also notations about the product's downside in the fact that the maximum power output of the new panels is only 95 watts with around 6.8 percent efficiency, less than the 20 percent efficiency being produced on other modern solar panels


So, that would put its efficiency at roughly a third (less then, actually) of other standard panels.

\\RIF
 
2012-09-27 02:38:18 PM
You know, I want to cover my back porch, I wonder if these would work as the roof for converting it into a sunroom
 
2012-09-27 02:53:58 PM
is it just me or is this slightly racist?

oh,
i wonder if the black panels are bigger than the white panels?
 
2012-09-27 03:01:00 PM

munko: is it just me or is this slightly racist?

oh,
i wonder if the black panels are bigger than the white panels?


Just try these, you won't want those other panels anymore.
 
2012-09-27 03:01:45 PM
See, that'd be great, replacing all windows with those would cut down on energy costs, but then some clever mathematician will work out the installation costs, how long it'd take to repay, and the environmental damage the creation of one pane of that glass costs and then people will go "oh... ok, well it's an early prototype, things will get better", and hold off... then in 10 years they will make a much better one, and we'll say "wow that's great, but they'll bring out a better one soon, no point spending £1bn on some glass when in 4 years we'll have to do the same again!"

So I guess the lesson here is make some with 100% efficiency so we can all buy it now and not worry about future models. Unless some crazy evil scientists create one with 110% efficiency and destroy science.
 
2012-09-27 03:03:46 PM

munko: is it just me or is this slightly racist?

oh,
i wonder if the black panels are bigger than the white panels?


They're bigger, but everyone knows the black panels don't work.

/so sorry.
 
2012-09-27 04:30:43 PM

Slaxl: See, that'd be great, replacing all windows with those would cut down on energy costs, but then some clever mathematician will work out the installation costs, how long it'd take to repay, and the environmental damage the creation of one pane of that glass costs and then people will go "oh... ok, well it's an early prototype, things will get better", and hold off... then in 10 years they will make a much better one, and we'll say "wow that's great, but they'll bring out a better one soon, no point spending £1bn on some glass when in 4 years we'll have to do the same again!"

So I guess the lesson here is make some with 100% efficiency so we can all buy it now and not worry about future models. Unless some crazy evil scientists create one with 110% efficiency and destroy science.


They're probably not going to replace every window in a skyscraper, that would be crazy expensive. But, if you're building a new sky scraper you have to think...Gee, I can pay x dollars per regular window, or y dollars per window that generates electicity. Then you do the math.
 
2012-09-27 06:15:11 PM

kevinfra: Slaxl: See, that'd be great, replacing all windows with those would cut down on energy costs, but then some clever mathematician will work out the installation costs, how long it'd take to repay, and the environmental damage the creation of one pane of that glass costs and then people will go "oh... ok, well it's an early prototype, things will get better", and hold off... then in 10 years they will make a much better one, and we'll say "wow that's great, but they'll bring out a better one soon, no point spending £1bn on some glass when in 4 years we'll have to do the same again!"

So I guess the lesson here is make some with 100% efficiency so we can all buy it now and not worry about future models. Unless some crazy evil scientists create one with 110% efficiency and destroy science.

They're probably not going to replace every window in a skyscraper, that would be crazy expensive. But, if you're building a new sky scraper you have to think...Gee, I can pay x dollars per regular window, or y dollars per window that generates electicity. Then you do the math.


Some jurisdictions award tax breaks for 'green' building, which may encourage some owners to convert, as such provisions multiply the cost benefits of doing it. It's also good PR.
 
2012-09-27 07:45:45 PM
Does "efficiency" include all the light falling on the window, or only the light blocked? 3M already has a film you can apply to any glass that has 20% efficiency.
 
2012-09-27 09:17:44 PM
Just how black are they? Blacker than the blackest black times infinity?
 
2012-09-28 08:54:43 AM

thecpt: It seems like they would have to be operable, but it doesn't look flexible. Heating and cooling buildings are the second and first most intense uses of power, with lighting in third. The panels would be helpful for the cooling, but the inefficiency won't help heating the building if it blocks too much light.


You would need more lighting near the windows on the sun facing sides on the upper floors where this stuff would go in. The rest of the office still needs regular lighting or gets regular glass.
 
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