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(Wired)   Why Google should demand every Android device come with an option for the Nexus treatment   (wired.com) divider line 108
    More: Obvious  
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4938 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Sep 2012 at 1:15 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 02:43:32 PM  

Gaseous Anomaly: emocomputerjock: moothemagiccow:

Oh and CyanogenMod is dumb as hell. There are too many models to support, so you have to buy the most popular phone. The version that came out for my phone disabled the camera, decreased call quality and disabled some keyboard buttons, according to the people who made it.

Support does differ from model to model, and it's usually better for popular models. Doublecheck the forums before commiting to rooting your device.

I ran into some trouble this way. Got an Incredible 4G when they came out, as I really like the 8960 chipset. Unlocked the HTC bootloader through htcdev.com. Then later the time came for Mrs. Anomaly to get a new phone. Got one like it. Now htcdev.com doesn't allow the Inc4G bootloader to be unlocked because Verizon doesn't want it to be.

Now she has Titanium backups she can't restore. Nobody's "hacked" it yet (as of a week or two ago). Oy.

Have you tried Unrevoked? Link
 
2012-09-27 02:50:27 PM  

Desquamation: They're also not exactly quick with the updates either... JB was finally pushed out, what, last week? It had been made available for the GSM Nexus months ago.


Ahh, gotcha. Stupid Verizon (no wait, stupid ALL providers. Sigh)
 
2012-09-27 02:52:05 PM  
I installed stock Jellybean on my HTC One-X, because I was bored, and I must say it's brilliant. I loved the HTC Sense camera app, but everything else is so much better. I completely agree with the author, if Google could make everyone stick to stock stuff but keep it open so if people want to mod it and customise it they can, it would improve the public perception of it. I am amazed there are people out there still on 2.2 or 2.3. Not by choice but because of carrier buffoonery.

Problem is, I reckon, that the carriers can do what they can with the Senses and the Touchwizzes because Android is free and open so they can make their own stuff. If Google wanted to stop it they could stop Android being open, but that would be far worse than to hear the fragmentation of the wome... err smartphones.

Am I right in saying that people don't want to root their phone and install custom stuff because they're worried they might break it, and make it unusable? Or that it would take a long time, with lots of reading up to learn how to do it properly? That was my fear at first, then when I upgraded phones I decided to use the older phone as a guinea pig to learn how it's done. It's remarkably easy. I think if Google could do something to make the process so simple people don't even need to know about bootloaders, custom recoveries and RUUs then they would see a massive surge in people upgrading before their carrier wants them to... only phone manufacturers could stop them by making the phones unrootable, but why would they? Only carriers want to lock down phones, and they're stuck with what they get from manufacturers and the latest version of Android.

I strongly urge anyone to look into doing a bit of DIY, rather than waiting for official OTA updates.
 
2012-09-27 02:54:33 PM  
I love my android, and I have no problem with allowing carriers to pre-install apps.  Fine, allow them not to be un-installed... but they damn well should not be running in the background if I have no use for them.  Seriously.
 
2012-09-27 02:57:40 PM  

MagSeven: Have you tried Unrevoked? Link


Doesn't work on that phone. Used it on our old Incredibles and it was great though.

S-OFF like that would be nice, no question.

/sucks that we have to hack to do that
 
2012-09-27 03:01:35 PM  

Gaseous Anomaly: MagSeven: Have you tried Unrevoked? Link

Doesn't work on that phone. Used it on our old Incredibles and it was great though.

S-OFF like that would be nice, no question.

/sucks that we have to hack to do that


Ah. Sorry. They had a Thunderbolt link on the far right of the page, but I wasn't sure if there was more than one model of Thunderbolt. Good luck either way.
 
2012-09-27 03:15:23 PM  

BullBearMS: Lord Dimwit: To get to even 90% of the market for Android, you have to write your app for 4.0, 2.3.3, and 2.2. While that's only three versions, it means you have to hit the lowest common version, which is 2.2, which is ancient by tech standards. You also have the problem of wildly different screen sizes and resolutions, different hardware configurations, different processor speeds, different amounts of memory, plus God knows what put on their by the mobile carrier. It's a massive PITA.

Here's the fine print for Major League Baseball's official Android app:

[dl.dropbox.com image 400x331] 

Translation:

Check the list of supported devices to see if you're one of the lucky few!

Our app requires Flash.

Flash is no longer supported and cannot be downloaded from Adobe anymore.

We have no idea if our app will work on your device. Let us know if it does!


You can't install flash anymore?

Link

Shouldn't you be spamming the thread with more graphs?
 
2012-09-27 03:21:57 PM  

NutznGum: CyanogenMod. That is all.


Every third party Android release I've used has been plagued by crippling bugs, and CyanogenMod has been no exception. CM7.1 and 7.2 both caused my phone to randomly crash to the point I had to pop the battery. The CM10-nightly I've been running has been more stable, but it has its share of oddities.

Perhaps my model is just uncommon enough to have fewer eyes doing QA and reporting bugs, but if CM is like this for most phones, it'll never be anything other than a toy.


slayer199: Has anyone rooted and installed Jelly Bean on a Galaxy SIII?


I have it installed on my S. I like it much more than Gingerbread, either with the TouchWiz interface or stock interface. JB runs just as fast and smooth as GB.

images12.fotki.com
 
2012-09-27 03:27:15 PM  

digistil: Electromax: is it realistic to expect this to be announced/released before December

Hard to say. If I were to put a really rough number on it, I'd guess 33% chance of release. The thing is the GeNex isn't exactly new, so it seems like they've got to release something soon. But on the other hand, JB just came out and Google tends to release Nexus devices with a new OS.


There's been no rumor of a new device coming out either. Not that there aren't any other capable devices out right now, but it might be best to skip the older Nex and just wait at this point.

Gaseous Anomaly: MagSeven: Have you tried Unrevoked? Link

Doesn't work on that phone. Used it on our old Incredibles and it was great though.

S-OFF like that would be nice, no question.

/sucks that we have to hack to do that


Sucks indeed. Sony is, as I understand it, playing very nice with the open-source community but other vendors are still being pains about it. The carriers on top of that make it more miserable and for what? It only ensures that the people interested in rooting their devices either go with a different manufacturer or carrier.

BullBearMS: Lord Dimwit: To get to even 90% of the market for Android, you have to write your app for 4.0, 2.3.3, and 2.2. While that's only three versions, it means you have to hit the lowest common version, which is 2.2, which is ancient by tech standards. You also have the problem of wildly different screen sizes and resolutions, different hardware configurations, different processor speeds, different amounts of memory, plus God knows what put on their by the mobile carrier. It's a massive PITA.

Here's the fine print for Major League Baseball's official Android app:

[dl.dropbox.com image 400x331]

Translation:

Check the list of supported devices to see if you're one of the lucky few!

Our app requires Flash.

Flash is no longer supported and cannot be downloaded from Adobe anymore.

We have no idea if our app will work on your device. Let us know if it does!


You can download Flash from Adobe here: Archived Flash Players

It can be sideloaded on devices running Jelly Bean and still works. The issue you have with the linked app isn't with Flash or Android for that matter, it's with MLB. They're the ones responsible for designing and updating that application and they either have not or will not unscrew their app, and neither of those is the fault of the customer, Google, the phone manufacturer, or your mom. Well, maybe your mom.
 
2012-09-27 03:28:28 PM  

change1211: BullBearMS: Lord Dimwit: To get to even 90% of the market for Android, you have to write your app for 4.0, 2.3.3, and 2.2. While that's only three versions, it means you have to hit the lowest common version, which is 2.2, which is ancient by tech standards. You also have the problem of wildly different screen sizes and resolutions, different hardware configurations, different processor speeds, different amounts of memory, plus God knows what put on their by the mobile carrier. It's a massive PITA.

Here's the fine print for Major League Baseball's official Android app:

[dl.dropbox.com image 400x331] 

Translation:

Check the list of supported devices to see if you're one of the lucky few!

Our app requires Flash.

Flash is no longer supported and cannot be downloaded from Adobe anymore.

We have no idea if our app will work on your device. Let us know if it does!

You can't install flash anymore?

Link

Shouldn't you be spamming the thread with more graphs?


Why's it using Flash anyway? The official MLB iOS app doesn't and still does all the same things (stats, scores, game audio, live video, etc).
 
2012-09-27 03:29:29 PM  

Dinjiin: NutznGum: CyanogenMod. That is all.

Every third party Android release I've used has been plagued by crippling bugs, and CyanogenMod has been no exception. CM7.1 and 7.2 both caused my phone to randomly crash to the point I had to pop the battery. The CM10-nightly I've been running has been more stable, but it has its share of oddities.

Perhaps my model is just uncommon enough to have fewer eyes doing QA and reporting bugs, but if CM is like this for most phones, it'll never be anything other than a toy.


slayer199: Has anyone rooted and installed Jelly Bean on a Galaxy SIII?

I have it installed on my S. I like it much more than Gingerbread, either with the TouchWiz interface or stock interface. JB runs just as fast and smooth as GB.

[images12.fotki.com image 282x425]


Glad I'm not the only one. I had CM and while it had loads of nifty features it had nifty problems too, I decided it wasn't worth it and went back to how it originally was on my old phone. I did consider trying CM10 on my One-x, but stock Jellybean has been flawless, I daren't ask any more of it.

Also I have a friend with an S3, installed Jellybean, loved it, installed CM10 and loves that too, so maybe it's worth giving it a go, but I'm good for now.
 
2012-09-27 03:35:39 PM  
For avoiding network bloatware in the UK, get your phone from a Carphone Warehouse store. They only carry factory fresh phone that are not locked to any network and don't have any network bloat or branding.

As for TFA, I'd love to see Google do this with Motorola, and maybe insist that each maker gives their customers the option of, for HTC for example, a One X with Sense and a One X with stock Android. Let the customer decide which version to buy. Or even have a simple option in the Menu to switch Sense on or off? No reason that couldn't be done, especially if Google required it.
I like Sense, but I'd be open to look at a stock Jelly Bean phone. Just can't be bothered to root it or any of that stuff. I should be getting the JB update in a few weeks but I assume it will still have Sense on top?
 
2012-09-27 03:45:03 PM  

Dinjiin: NutznGum: CyanogenMod. That is all.

Every third party Android release I've used has been plagued by crippling bugs, and CyanogenMod has been no exception. CM7.1 and 7.2 both caused my phone to randomly crash to the point I had to pop the battery. The CM10-nightly I've been running has been more stable, but it has its share of oddities.

Perhaps my model is just uncommon enough to have fewer eyes doing QA and reporting bugs, but if CM is like this for most phones, it'll never be anything other than a toy.


What model do you have? CM has run like a dream on my phone (SGS I) since 7.0. I'm running a nightly version of CM10 (jellybean) right now and its working flawlessly. It does depend a lot on the model, a less popular handset will have less users so less bug reports and less development.
 
2012-09-27 03:45:15 PM  
I've owned exactly two Android phones. The very first original G1, and now a Samsung/Google Nexus S 4G. Rooting the phone was extremely easy. Installing a custom bootloader was a fair bit more difficult but ultimately more tedious than difficult. Flashing cyanogenmod was simple.

Currently running cm9 because apparently the CM10 ROM has left out the camera app for now. No biggie. I'll flash when it's a little farther along.

I really wish more people would look into doing this sort of thing. You might be surprised at how easy it can be. There are well documented step by step instructions for every part of the process. If you run into an issue, a quick google search turns up a dozen threads of people who had the same issue and got it resolved.

Courage, my friends. Courage.

/And always make a backup!
 
2012-09-27 03:46:36 PM  

Electromax: I have a 2-year old Droid X. Was due for new phone in June but used it to get my gf an iPhone 4S for her birthday. Now she's about due for upgrade and I'm going to use it.

Was originally thinking S3 as I don't feel compelled to get iPhone 5, but at this point I'm pretty much going between the Galaxy Nexus or whatever the next Nexus phone is.

For those of you who might have more of a finger on the smartphone pulse, is it realistic to expect this to be announced/released before December? I don't mind waiting a couple months because my old droid is still working fine, but if it won't be until March 2013 I'll probably just get the older Nexus.

I love my Nexus 7, first non-iPad tablet I used and opened my eyes to the beauty of Android OS without verizon/whoever's bloat and "improvements". Man is that thing slick and responsive even when I've got Youtube open for a game vid, FPSe running a PS1 game, and GameFAQs on the browser and constantly switching between the 3 windows (damn you Final Fantasy 9 chocographs). I want this capability in phone-size now.


I'm speaking as someone who had a Droid X and stepped up to the Galaxy Nexus on the day of release. My GNex is pretty great, and I've playing around with all the major roms (Bugless Beast at the moment) but the reception leaves something to be desired. My friend's Razer Maxx gets 4G no problem in places where I cannot.

The rumor mill is saying that new Nexus phones will be announced for the holiday season. I'd wait for that, if you can hold out on your Droid X a bit longer. I plan to hold out on my Nexus until the new Google/Motorola partnership produces a Nexus phone. Hoping for superb Motorola build quality and reception on a Nexus phone. However, if the HTC One X 5 inch Nexus phone proves to be more than a rumor, I might have to jump on that...
 
2012-09-27 03:53:43 PM  

NutznGum: ChubbyTiger: Beerguy: I have a Galaxy Nexus and it is glorious.

This.

NutznGum: CyanogenMod. That is all.

And this.

JB is wonderful stock, but CM10 is amazing.

Ya, I have CM10 running on a Galaxy I, a 3 year old phone. Runs better than it ever has.


Really? I have cm10 on a vibrant, and while I love it, the performance is a little twitchy.
 
2012-09-27 03:57:28 PM  

emocomputerjock: The issue you have with the linked app isn't with Flash or Android for that matter, it's with MLB.


No. The issue is that Android is such a fragmented mess in which updates are not provided to customers who aren't willing to buy a new phone that MLB can't make a profit without designing for the lowest common denominator.
 
2012-09-27 04:10:01 PM  

BullBearMS: emocomputerjock: The issue you have with the linked app isn't with Flash or Android for that matter, it's with MLB.

No. The issue is that Android is such a fragmented mess in which updates are not provided to customers who aren't willing to buy a new phone that MLB can't make a profit without designing for the lowest common denominator.


"Fragmentation" is what gives people choice. Choice in handset design, size, function and software look and feel. Complaining about it is like complaining that the US supermarket industry is "fragmented" and demanding that every single supermarket in the US should be a WalMart, totally identical in layout and goods to every other WalMart. No other supermarket chain allowed, no deviation from the standard WalMart store.
 
2012-09-27 04:12:05 PM  

BullBearMS: emocomputerjock: The issue you have with the linked app isn't with Flash or Android for that matter, it's with MLB.

No. The issue is that Android is such a fragmented mess in which updates are not provided to customers who aren't willing to buy a new phone that MLB can't make a profit without designing for the lowest common denominator.


It also drives innovation. That's why almost every Apple "innovation" is something that has been available on other phones for ages already, either as a standard feature or an app.
 
2012-09-27 04:14:39 PM  

Flint Ironstag: "Fragmentation" is what gives people choice.


So why did Google announce that it was a problem and tout a failed initiative to fix it?

At the Google I/O conference in May, many Android phone vendors and U.S. wireless carriers made a long-awaited promise: From then on, any new Android phone would receive timely OS updates for at least 18 months following launch, as part of the then newly christened Google Update Alliance.

The back story: If you own an Android phone, you may have watched with frustration as a new version of the OS hit the market. It's almost never clear if your phone will ever get that upgrade-unlike with iOS or Windows Phones, which always get all upgrades (providing they meet the right hardware requirements). With Android, it seems to depend on the phone vendor, the specific model, the wireless carrier, the Android version itself, and whether Google sent the carrier an inflatable plastic food product as a token of its appreciation that week. Worse-and much to our chagrin-sometimes vendors make promises to customers before the sale that they don't keep once you own the phone.

Many factors contribute to this. But custom versions of Android are the key culprit, either thanks to vendor-specific enhancements (like HTC Sense, Motorola MotoBlur, and Samsung's TouchWiz, though LG, Pantech, Casio, and other vendors do it too), or carrier-specific enhancements of a more dubious nature (such as unnecessary preloaded bloatware and changes to default apps). These changes require many programming hours not just to make in the first place, but to also support and upgrade down the road-resources the carrier would rather throw at making new phones to sell you.

So the Google Update Alliance was a breath of fresh air. It sounded like everyone would finally come together, streamline their OS update timelines, and stop jerking around their customers. The thing is, while the Google Update Alliance ended up being one of the biggest stories to come out of Google I/O, we've heard almost nothing about it since then. You can bet we weren't just going to forget about it and pretend it never happened-especially after the release of Google Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich), which is a huge leap in UI design and overall performance.

So seven months in, we thought we'd circle back and ask all those vendors an important question: How's it going? Here's what they had to say-and unfortunately, it's not at all good:

The original promise wasn't about a vendor evaluating if it would issue an upgrade, or about letting us know sometime next year when it made a decision. It was that hardware permitting, all Android devices would get OS updates in a reasonable amount of time within the first 18 months.

Yet, as we close 2011 and head into 2012, we're still running into the same confused messaging, empty promises, and delayed announcements that have plagued Android OS updates from the beginning. This means that for all intents and purposes, the Google Android Update Alliance is already dead.
 
2012-09-27 04:14:43 PM  

Flint Ironstag: BullBearMS: emocomputerjock: The issue you have with the linked app isn't with Flash or Android for that matter, it's with MLB.

No. The issue is that Android is such a fragmented mess in which updates are not provided to customers who aren't willing to buy a new phone that MLB can't make a profit without designing for the lowest common denominator.

"Fragmentation" is what gives people choice. Choice in handset design, size, function and software look and feel. Complaining about it is like complaining that the US supermarket industry is "fragmented" and demanding that every single supermarket in the US should be a WalMart, totally identical in layout and goods to every other WalMart. No other supermarket chain allowed, no deviation from the standard WalMart store.


Which would be an apt analogy only if some stores for no good damn reason only allowed red cars to park and sold you the same goods as other stores, but that were sometimes randomly placed in unopenable jars.
 
2012-09-27 04:16:47 PM  

BullBearMS: emocomputerjock: The issue you have with the linked app isn't with Flash or Android for that matter, it's with MLB.

No. The issue is that Android is such a fragmented mess in which updates are not provided to customers who aren't willing to buy a new phone that MLB can't make a profit without designing for the lowest common denominator.


The NFL, NBA, NHL, UFC, UEFA, and MLS all have working apps.
 
2012-09-27 04:19:20 PM  

OriginalGamer: Yeah, this is one thing I've never understood about Android and things like bloat ware, or no updates.

People always say "It's not Google's fault, blame the carriers!"

Is there any particular reason Google couldn't say "If you want our OS you have to allow updates when we push them out, and you have to allow removal of bloat or you can Fark off."

The carrier shouldn't even have a say when it comes to updates. I'm not understanding why this is still an issue. So what's going on? Why do all iOS devices get OTA updates simultaneously regardless of whether they are on AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, etc but not Android?

These carriers need to Fark off. The only thing that should be happening is "Google releases new Android OS. Update checker sees if your hardware is capable of running it. If yes, offer update." And nothing else.



Actually, I think it starts with hardware. Google does not control the hardware, so the people who make the phones need to handle the drivers. Any forced push from Google would look like CM hitting a brand new phone whose drivers have yet to be released/cracked. Half the shiat isn't going to work.
Apple gets to test updates on their... 6 different phones is it(or less if they don't update the older ones anymore)? All hardware that they designed and have intimate knowledge of. Full control from drawing board to the end users hands makes it much easier to be so seamless.

Beyond that, then the cell providers are offering a greater incentive for the hardware guys to add bloat than they can resist, either wads of cash, preferential treatment, or maybe threats of some sort, who knows.

Android was a much smaller piece of the market at first, and when you're the new guy, it's easier to gain ground if you're a little more accommodating. If they had a hard line on "no bloat, no custom UI, etc!" then it wouldn't have taken off the way it has.

I know some of the early phones, bloat removal required root, but I just managed to uninstall that dumb "VZ Navigator" app that came on my Galaxy S3 (not rooted yet)

I never really understood the extreme hate against custom UIs though, have used Sense, Touchwiz, CM, default Honeycomb, meh, they all get the job done in their own way. Any time I hit a new one, it seems a little off, but I'm pretty well adjusted to it within a few days.
 
2012-09-27 04:25:50 PM  

Flint Ironstag: It also drives innovation. That's why almost every Apple "innovation" is something that has been available on other phones for ages already, either as a standard feature or an app.


Really?

the iPhone 5 display is a quantum leap better than the display on the iPhone 4. Contrast levels and light output have both been increased, and color performance is astonishing. The full sRGB gamut is present here, and color errors are remarkably low even for a high end desktop display.

To put this in perspective, in the past few years I've reviewed probably 30-40 different displays, from PC monitors to TVs to projectors. Not a single one, out of the box, can put up the Gretag Macbeth dE numbers that the iPhone can, and perhaps one projector (which listed for $20,000) can approach the grayscale and color accuracy out of the box.


Or...

Apple has again taken the lead in methodical refinements and factory calibration that are necessary to produce accurate very high picture quality. Based on our extensive Lab measurements the iPhone 5 has a true state-of-the-art accurate display - it's not perfect and there is plenty of room for improvements (and competitors) but it is the best Smartphone display we have seen to date based on extensive Lab measurements and viewing tests.

Meanwhile, let's look at the Samsung Galaxy S III's crappy pentile display:

the Brightness is about half of the iPhone 5 due to power limits from the lower power efficiency of OLEDs and concerns regarding premature OLED aging.

The Color Gamut is not only much larger than the Standard Color Gamut, which leads to distorted and exaggerated colors, but the Color Gamut is quite lopsided, with Green being a lot more saturated than Red or Blue, which adds a Green color caste to many images.

Samsung has not bothered to correct or calibrate their display colors to bring them into closer agreement with the Standard sRGB / Rec.709 Color Gamut, so many images appear over saturated and gaudy.

Running Time on battery is less than the iPhone 5 due to the lower power efficiency of OLEDs, even given that the Galaxy S III has a much larger battery capacity and much lower Brightness.

The Galaxy S III has a PenTile OLED display, which has only half of the number of Red and Blue sub-pixels as in standard RGB displays
, like those on the iPhones. The eye's resolution for color image detail is lower, so this works well for photographic and video image content, but NOT for computer generated colored text and fine graphics because it produces visible pixelation, moiré, and other very visible artifacts, so a PenTile display is not as sharp as its pixel Resolution and PPI would indicate.


Is Samsung's "innovation" in providing dim, power sucking, inaccurate displays that make everything look green because their crappy pentiled display has twice as many green pixels as it does red or blue?
 
2012-09-27 04:27:40 PM  
There are those who think Android is a great operating system,
There are those who do not.

Both sides know that BullBearMS is a weak-ass troll.
 
2012-09-27 04:38:55 PM  

BullBearMS: Flint Ironstag: "Fragmentation" is what gives people choice.

So why did Google announce that it was a problem and tout a failed initiative to fix it?

At the Google I/O conference in May, many Android phone vendors and U.S. wireless carriers made a long-awaited promise: From then on, any new Android phone would receive timely OS updates for at least 18 months following launch, as part of the then newly christened Google Update Alliance.

The back story: If you own an Android phone, you may have watched with frustration as a new version of the OS hit the market. It's almost never clear if your phone will ever get that upgrade-unlike with iOS or Windows Phones, which always get all upgrades (providing they meet the right hardware requirements). With Android, it seems to depend on the phone vendor, the specific model, the wireless carrier, the Android version itself, and whether Google sent the carrier an inflatable plastic food product as a token of its appreciation that week. Worse-and much to our chagrin-sometimes vendors make promises to customers before the sale that they don't keep once you own the phone.

Many factors contribute to this. But custom versions of Android are the key culprit, either thanks to vendor-specific enhancements (like HTC Sense, Motorola MotoBlur, and Samsung's TouchWiz, though LG, Pantech, Casio, and other vendors do it too), or carrier-specific enhancements of a more dubious nature (such as unnecessary preloaded bloatware and changes to default apps). These changes require many programming hours not just to make in the first place, but to also support and upgrade down the road-resources the carrier would rather throw at making new phones to sell you.

So the Google Update Alliance was a breath of fresh air. It sounded like everyone would finally come together, streamline their OS update timelines, and stop jerking around their customers. The thing is, while the Google Update Alliance ended up being one of the biggest stories to come out ...


None of that says they were trying to eliminate fragmentation. It says they were trying to speed up updates across all (fragmented) makes and models.

Fragmentation does cause problems. But it also give us far, far, more positive benefits that outweigh the problems. It's why Android has led Apple again and again in bringing new features to market. An individual manufacturer can develop a new or better feature and bring it to market without having to get permission from every other manufacturer or worry about compatibility.
 
2012-09-27 04:45:45 PM  

Flint Ironstag: But it also give us far, far, more positive benefits that outweigh the problems.


Buying a phone that never receives needed updates is not a benefit, no matter how much you try to pretend it is.

Google has admitted this. TFA is all about this problem.

Why can't you be honest?
 
2012-09-27 04:48:35 PM  

Linoleum_Blownapart: I have a Samsung Galaxy S with unremovable AT&T bloatware and it's awful.


CyanogenMod.

ChubbyTiger: JB is wonderful stock, but CM10 is amazing.


I rooted my Galaxy Nexus (adblock, FTW), but haven't bothered with CM10 yet. JB is good enough, and I don't want to go through the hassle of backing up and restoring everything. Plus, I have my data partition encrypted, so I don't even know how easy it is to backup/restore.

Unlike CM7, which made gingerbread actually usable, JB seems to be fine on its own. Is there a particular "killer feature" that CM10 is bringing to the table?
 
2012-09-27 04:52:18 PM  

NutznGum: CyanogenMod. That is all.


Unsupported handset (Rezound).

Got anything else?
 
2012-09-27 04:55:11 PM  

Kuroshin: NutznGum: CyanogenMod. That is all.

Unsupported handset (Rezound).

Got anything else?


Unofficial Cynaogen port?
 
2012-09-27 04:58:38 PM  

Tax Boy: Kuroshin: NutznGum: CyanogenMod. That is all.

Unsupported handset (Rezound).

Got anything else?

Unofficial Cynaogen port?


Yyyyyyyyeeeeeeeeaaaaaahhh... Not sure how much I trust that one. ICS works rather well, even if I would like to get rid of HTC's nonsense modifications to the UI.

Such a great phone. Too bad it's apparently a biatch to program for.
 
2012-09-27 05:03:56 PM  

BullBearMS: Flint Ironstag: It also drives innovation. That's why almost every Apple "innovation" is something that has been available on other phones for ages already, either as a standard feature or an app.

Really?

the iPhone 5 display is a quantum leap better than the display on the iPhone 4. Contrast levels and light output have both been increased, and color performance is astonishing. The full sRGB gamut is present here, and color errors are remarkably low even for a high end desktop display.

To put this in perspective, in the past few years I've reviewed probably 30-40 different displays, from PC monitors to TVs to projectors. Not a single one, out of the box, can put up the Gretag Macbeth dE numbers that the iPhone can, and perhaps one projector (which listed for $20,000) can approach the grayscale and color accuracy out of the box.

Or...

Apple has again taken the lead in methodical refinements and factory calibration that are necessary to produce accurate very high picture quality. Based on our extensive Lab measurements the iPhone 5 has a true state-of-the-art accurate display - it's not perfect and there is plenty of room for improvements (and competitors) but it is the best Smartphone display we have seen to date based on extensive Lab measurements and viewing tests.

Meanwhile, let's look at the Samsung Galaxy S III's crappy pentile display:

the Brightness is about half of the iPhone 5 due to power limits from the lower power efficiency of OLEDs and concerns regarding premature OLED aging.

The Color Gamut is not only much larger than the Standard Color Gamut, which leads to distorted and exaggerated colors, but the Color Gamut is quite lopsided, with Green being a lot more saturated than Red or Blue, which adds a Green color caste to many images.

Samsung has not bothered to correct or calibrate their display colors to bring them into closer agreement with the Standard sRGB / Rec.709 Color Gamut, so many images appear over saturated and gaudy.

Running Time ...



"Innovations" that Apple introduced way after they were already available elsewhere.

Panoramic camera. Notification bar, Turn by turn navigation. customer changeable wallpaper. Image crop tool. A flash on the camera. Natural language voice PA (Pannous Voice Actions was out six months before Siri and does the same thing), Multitasking, wifi synch and OTA updates, Open apps directly from lock screen, front facing camera, copy and paste, 4G, NFC...

And being able to attach a file to an email reply from the email client, of course.

Bigger screen? Still some catching up to do.
Burst mode, taking dozens of pics in few seconds? Still waiting.
No shutter lag? Still witing.
Full HD screen (720P capable)? Still waiting
Widgets? Still waiting.
Set any song as ringtone without having to pay Apple again? Don't hold your breath....
App freedom (load any app you want whether Google ,like it or not)? Yeah, right....
Swappable battery, upgradable and swapable storage? Satan will be skating to work before then.
 
2012-09-27 05:07:35 PM  

BullBearMS: Flint Ironstag: But it also give us far, far, more positive benefits that outweigh the problems.

Buying a phone that never receives needed updates is not a benefit, no matter how much you try to pretend it is.

Google has admitted this. TFA is all about this problem.

Why can't you be honest?


Have you admitted you lied when you said Google told you to "walk on water" when you already knew it was suggesting a passenger ferry?


Slow updates is a problem. But fragmentation brings more advantages than disadvantages. That's why Google aren't even remotely suggesting eliminating it, just working to bring updates out sooner.
 
2012-09-27 05:10:25 PM  
BTW Motorola and a couple others now sell developer phones to anyone who wants one, which means it comes with access to root. The issue isn't so much the people who make the phones, it's the cell service providers. Samsung sends the CyanogenMod people free developer phones so they can make sure it works well with them. So it's not like Samsung cares about people rooting their phones and loading whatever they want on their phones.
 
2012-09-27 05:20:16 PM  

Flint Ironstag: "Fragmentation" is what gives people choice.


A variety in hardware gives people choice. A variety in desktop themes and applications gives people choice. Those are valid and creative examples of fragmentation.

In the case of Android OS updates, carriers are restricting choice. They are relegating phones to end-of-life status in as little as one year after their release, halting any new Android OS updates from being available. So you have perfectly good phones stuck at whatever version of Android their carriers dumped them at. The result is Android OS fragmentation.

People wouldn't be complaining [as much] if phones were moved to end-of-life status closer to the end of their natural lifespan. It could be argued that today, that's around 3 or 4 years in age. People could make an informed choice to stay with their current version of Android or upgrade. And application developers would be less pigeonholed into keeping support for Eclair or Gingerbread because users could weigh their choice to upgrade or not.

I don't understand how you believe that OS fragmentation is a "good thing". It retards the adoption of new features as developers are pressured in keeping support for the most common lowest denominator.
 
2012-09-27 05:28:05 PM  

Linoleum_Blownapart: I have a Samsung Galaxy S with unremovable AT&T bloatware and it's awful.


You need to go to samsungs website and upgrade it yourself.

Since the Subby and wired writer is not mentioning is that google is doing this with android 4.0 and above, that OS gives every user the ability to disable/remove all bloatware, that is also why none of the carriers are in a hurry to push out an update for their devices which is why you have to visit your phone manufacturers website to get the updates.

Check for your device here.

I think google's next step is to set up a program similar to itunes that will allow all android phones to connect and automatically search for updates for their OS, Google got in bed with the carriers to start with and got their foot in the door so now they have to force them to allow automatic updates instead of letting carriers handle it since they just want to install their bloatware on devices.
 
2012-09-27 05:37:09 PM  

Flint Ironstag: That's why Google aren't even remotely suggesting eliminating it, just working to bring updates out sooner.


Actually from 4.0 on they are eliminating it and telling phone makers they have to list updates on their sites in a timely manner if they want to continue to use their OS, the reason its not getting a lot of press is because no carrier wants the consumers know that option is out there since you can disable all their shiatty software. Even the ATT store didnt have a clue, I went in to ask them a question and he assumed I had rooted it since "ICS is not on the skyrocket yet because ATT doesnt allow it" I showed him it was the skyrocket, not rooted, bloat ware disabled, and samsung crap gone. I had 5 people crowding around me asking me how I did it and just wanted the site location to see if they could update.

Google's biggest problem is the carriers, that was why iphone was only on ATT, no other carrier wanted to give up that much control until they were forced to, they wanted to push their crappy software and ads to all of us when its useless, I rooted a lot of devices but wanted to stay away from my primary phone because I didnt want to deal with it if I broke the damn thing. Although google restore ability and manufacturers restore have made it a lot easier, all my music and contacts drop right back on the device.
 
2012-09-27 06:28:09 PM  

Dinjiin: Flint Ironstag: "Fragmentation" is what gives people choice.

A variety in hardware gives people choice. A variety in desktop themes and applications gives people choice. Those are valid and creative examples of fragmentation.

In the case of Android OS updates, carriers are restricting choice. They are relegating phones to end-of-life status in as little as one year after their release, halting any new Android OS updates from being available. So you have perfectly good phones stuck at whatever version of Android their carriers dumped them at. The result is Android OS fragmentation.

People wouldn't be complaining [as much] if phones were moved to end-of-life status closer to the end of their natural lifespan. It could be argued that today, that's around 3 or 4 years in age. People could make an informed choice to stay with their current version of Android or upgrade. And application developers would be less pigeonholed into keeping support for Eclair or Gingerbread because users could weigh their choice to upgrade or not.

I don't understand how you believe that OS fragmentation is a "good thing". It retards the adoption of new features as developers are pressured in keeping support for the most common lowest denominator.


OS freedom is a good thing, it allows manufacturers to develop their own skins, new features etc. It leads to update delays and then lack of further updates, which is bad.

But that freedom has still unarguably allowed Android to lead the way with many, many features that Apple has taken time to catch up or, in many cases, has yet to catch up and given people real choice in getting phones that suit them, rather than have every Android phone absolutely identical and the only option is the colour of the case.
 
2012-09-27 06:31:04 PM  

steamingpile: Flint Ironstag: That's why Google aren't even remotely suggesting eliminating it, just working to bring updates out sooner.

Actually from 4.0 on they are eliminating it and telling phone makers they have to list updates on their sites in a timely manner if they want to continue to use their OS, the reason its not getting a lot of press is because no carrier wants the consumers know that option is out there since you can disable all their shiatty software. Even the ATT store didnt have a clue, I went in to ask them a question and he assumed I had rooted it since "ICS is not on the skyrocket yet because ATT doesnt allow it" I showed him it was the skyrocket, not rooted, bloat ware disabled, and samsung crap gone. I had 5 people crowding around me asking me how I did it and just wanted the site location to see if they could update.

Google's biggest problem is the carriers, that was why iphone was only on ATT, no other carrier wanted to give up that much control until they were forced to, they wanted to push their crappy software and ads to all of us when its useless, I rooted a lot of devices but wanted to stay away from my primary phone because I didnt want to deal with it if I broke the damn thing. Although google restore ability and manufacturers restore have made it a lot easier, all my music and contacts drop right back on the device.

 
2012-09-27 06:33:29 PM  

Flint Ironstag: steamingpile: Flint Ironstag: That's why Google aren't even remotely suggesting eliminating it, just working to bring updates out sooner.

Actually from 4.0 on they are eliminating it and telling phone makers they have to list updates on their sites in a timely manner if they want to continue to use their OS, the reason its not getting a lot of press is because no carrier wants the consumers know that option is out there since you can disable all their shiatty software. Even the ATT store didnt have a clue, I went in to ask them a question and he assumed I had rooted it since "ICS is not on the skyrocket yet because ATT doesnt allow it" I showed him it was the skyrocket, not rooted, bloat ware disabled, and samsung crap gone. I had 5 people crowding around me asking me how I did it and just wanted the site location to see if they could update.

Google's biggest problem is the carriers, that was why iphone was only on ATT, no other carrier wanted to give up that much control until they were forced to, they wanted to push their crappy software and ads to all of us when its useless, I rooted a lot of devices but wanted to stay away from my primary phone because I didnt want to deal with it if I broke the damn thing. Although google restore ability and manufacturers restore have made it a lot easier, all my music and contacts drop right back on the device.


They are not eliminating fragmentation. All manufacturers are still allowed to have their own Sense, Touchwiz etc and all carriers are still allowed to have their own bloatware.

They are insisting on timely updates being available, there will still be differences between individual phones and their capabilities, their interfaces etc.
 
2012-09-27 06:42:00 PM  

Bonanza Jellybean: [ficcionesreales.files.wordpress.com image 320x240]


I prefer this basic pleasure model:

mimg.ugo.com

But whatever floats your boat
 
2012-09-27 06:42:49 PM  

Linoleum_Blownapart: Beerguy: I have a Galaxy Nexus and it is glorious.

I have a Samsung Galaxy S with unremovable AT&T bloatware and it's awful.

This week's cool trick, if you spend more then 10 seconds looking at something before you take a picture it locks the controls. To unlock you have to hit the power button, but if you press that button for to long, the phone turns off instead.

Tried to take some pictures of my kids while I was out last weekend, wound up unintentionally rebooting the phone half a dozen times. Too many reboots in a row and it trashed the microSD card.

Still, I'm not moving to an iPhone until they implement a call reject list.


Root the device and install root explorer. Then you can uninstall the bloatware by directly deleting the files.
 
2012-09-27 07:10:09 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Flint Ironstag: steamingpile: Flint Ironstag: That's why Google aren't even remotely suggesting eliminating it, just working to bring updates out sooner.

Actually from 4.0 on they are eliminating it and telling phone makers they have to list updates on their sites in a timely manner if they want to continue to use their OS, the reason its not getting a lot of press is because no carrier wants the consumers know that option is out there since you can disable all their shiatty software. Even the ATT store didnt have a clue, I went in to ask them a question and he assumed I had rooted it since "ICS is not on the skyrocket yet because ATT doesnt allow it" I showed him it was the skyrocket, not rooted, bloat ware disabled, and samsung crap gone. I had 5 people crowding around me asking me how I did it and just wanted the site location to see if they could update.

Google's biggest problem is the carriers, that was why iphone was only on ATT, no other carrier wanted to give up that much control until they were forced to, they wanted to push their crappy software and ads to all of us when its useless, I rooted a lot of devices but wanted to stay away from my primary phone because I didnt want to deal with it if I broke the damn thing. Although google restore ability and manufacturers restore have made it a lot easier, all my music and contacts drop right back on the device.

They are not eliminating fragmentation. All manufacturers are still allowed to have their own Sense, Touchwiz etc and all carriers are still allowed to have their own bloatware.

They are insisting on timely updates being available, there will still be differences between individual phones and their capabilities, their interfaces etc.


You're not reading correctly, they are allowing all that shiat to be deleted/disabled on android 4.0+, it is why no carrier is in a hurry to post updates.

http://www.droid-life.com/2012/07/09/last-reminder-bloatware-can-be-d i sabled-on-the-galaxy-s3/

I have done this on my skyrocket and ICS allows this on any device, that's why you can only get it from the phone makers not the service provider.
 
2012-09-27 07:32:07 PM  
I was expecting pictures of a crying baby and ugly bar graphs. Those are coming soon, right?
 
2012-09-27 07:51:16 PM  

Desquamation: Grither: Desquamation: ...not as happy with Verizon.

Verizon is about a bajillion times better than AT&T, at least in NYC.

It's not their service I have a problem with (their service for the most part is great in Detroit) it's their handling of the Nexus.

I was shocked that VZW actually got Google to go along with allowing some of Verizon's crap apps to be included in the supposedly stock OS.

They're also not exactly quick with the updates either... JB was finally pushed out, what, last week? It had been made available for the GSM Nexus months ago.


The only app I like that Verizon puts on is the data counter widget. That way, I get to laugh and laugh as I take advantage of my unlimited data plan while other people are paying too damn much for a pittance of data.
 
2012-09-27 07:52:37 PM  

machodonkeywrestler: Linoleum_Blownapart: Beerguy: I have a Galaxy Nexus and it is glorious.

I have a Samsung Galaxy S with unremovable AT&T bloatware and it's awful.

This week's cool trick, if you spend more then 10 seconds looking at something before you take a picture it locks the controls. To unlock you have to hit the power button, but if you press that button for to long, the phone turns off instead.

Tried to take some pictures of my kids while I was out last weekend, wound up unintentionally rebooting the phone half a dozen times. Too many reboots in a row and it trashed the microSD card.

Still, I'm not moving to an iPhone until they implement a call reject list.

Root the device and install root explorer. Then you can uninstall the bloatware by directly deleting the files.


This may cause problems when updating the firmware of the phone.... Better option: install an app (forgot the name) that freezes up and hides the bloatware, but any other programs you want to hide.
 
2012-09-27 08:01:09 PM  

RoxtarRyan: machodonkeywrestler: Linoleum_Blownapart: Beerguy: I have a Galaxy Nexus and it is glorious.

I have a Samsung Galaxy S with unremovable AT&T bloatware and it's awful.

This week's cool trick, if you spend more then 10 seconds looking at something before you take a picture it locks the controls. To unlock you have to hit the power button, but if you press that button for to long, the phone turns off instead.

Tried to take some pictures of my kids while I was out last weekend, wound up unintentionally rebooting the phone half a dozen times. Too many reboots in a row and it trashed the microSD card.

Still, I'm not moving to an iPhone until they implement a call reject list.

Root the device and install root explorer. Then you can uninstall the bloatware by directly deleting the files.

This may cause problems when updating the firmware of the phone.... Better option: install an app (forgot the name) that freezes up and hides the bloatware, but any other programs you want to hide.


Titanium Backup. You can either delete it completely or freeze it so it never bothers you again.
 
2012-09-27 08:37:06 PM  

steamingpile: You're not reading correctly, they are allowing all that shiat to be deleted/disabled on android 4.0+, it is why no carrier is in a hurry to post updates.

http://www.droid-life.com/2012/07/09/last-reminder-bloatware-can-be-d i sabled-on-the-galaxy-s3/

I have done this on my skyrocket and ICS allows this on any device, that's why you can only get it from the phone makers not the service provider.


From reading that that disables bloatware apps. It does not disable Sense, Touchwiz etc.

So since those phones will still have different physical capabilities and different Skins they will still need each update to be tailored to each phone by the manufacturer. Otherwise Google would not need to chase everyone and try to make them release updates promptly. They'd just release the new version of Android and bingo, everyone installs it.

Phones will still have lots of different Skins, features etc. It has not eliminated Fragmentation.
 
2012-09-27 08:39:17 PM  
BTW I don't have any bloatware on my phone, it is factory stock, no network apps, lock or branding.. Unless you count Sense as bloatware, which I don't...
 
2012-09-27 08:39:52 PM  
My Galaxy Nexus rocks. I can't even ironically compare it with my palm pre.
 
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