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(BBC)   Americans are sounding more like Brits every day. Bloody hell   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 278
    More: Cool, Americans, Chandra Levy, bloody hell, American English, Merriam-Webster, London Evening Standard, University of Delaware, British English  
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14267 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2012 at 5:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 12:13:59 AM
Just a bunch of wankers trying to sound cool.
 
2012-09-27 12:19:09 AM
Pull the other one, ya silly git
 
2012-09-27 12:22:06 AM
See what happens when people start watching British dramas?
 
2012-09-27 12:30:50 AM
We are one people, separated by a common language.
 
2012-09-27 12:35:18 AM
I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!
 
2012-09-27 12:42:44 AM

Ambivalence: I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!


Also, "buggery" is a much more fun and friendly sounding word than sodomy.

Sodomy sounds scary and painful. Buggery sounds like something fun you do with your buds after a night of drinking
 
2012-09-27 12:53:48 AM

FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?


and interacting with british people online.

FirstNationalBastard: Ambivalence: I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!

Also, "buggery" is a much more fun and friendly sounding word than sodomy.

Sodomy sounds scary and painful. Buggery sounds like something fun you do with your buds after a night of drinking


agreed
 
2012-09-27 12:58:29 AM

FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?


I blame Monty Python
 
2012-09-27 01:00:35 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python


Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.
 
2012-09-27 01:00:55 AM
i253.photobucket.comBrits need to put olives on the tips of their fingers it feels good AND IT'S THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE OF FUN!
 
2012-09-27 01:03:51 AM
Oddly enough, Americans have preserved in some isolated communities, a more "true" British dialect than the current wash of BBC English and urban dialects.

Even as English has changed here, influenced by waves of immigration, changed in the Caribbean, changed in Australia, English was doing the same thing in England as well. Modern dialects are NOT the same as they were, and English is a language that is wonderfully adaptive, in its ability to absorb linguistic elements from languages it's near. The ability to absorb loan words, to still maintain structures, and in some ways, the "backwoods" dialects of America, have preserved many older elements of English.

Mass communication has done some interesting things with transmission of linguistic elements. Cultures aren't preserving changes for as long, and there is an odd bit of homogenization between cultures, including between sub-cultures across nations. It's a neat time to be a linguist. Even with the spread of film and even radio, there was a rise for a sort of "standard" dialect. BBC Standard, American Standard, and others, as a sort of "official" dialect, and entirely artificial, as opposed to the regionals, and the rise of folks aping the dialects that they heard on radio and in films, it sort of slowed linguistic drift, but now that we have a wider range of dialects spread quickly with mass communication, and less than official channels where just about anyone can upload videos, music and more, we get to see a lot more diversity, and oddly enough, folks aping one another.

Like I said, neat time to be a linguist.
 
2012-09-27 01:05:00 AM

FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

Are You Being Served?

and Keeping Up Appearances were both pretty popular

/personally I was a big fan of Waiting For God, too
 
2012-09-27 01:05:05 AM

FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.


It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.
 
2012-09-27 01:10:40 AM
I like the phrase "get sorted"
 
2012-09-27 01:12:58 AM

quickdraw: I like the phrase "get sorted"


"Bunk up" has some appeal, but then again, I ain't good people...
 
2012-09-27 01:29:27 AM
I blame Madonna.
 
2012-09-27 01:39:49 AM

FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?


Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers
 
2012-09-27 01:39:56 AM
Shall we continue to use the dreaded English tongue? I thought that the folk tongue was about as pop as a bog roll after a mint chock chip festival
 
2012-09-27 01:41:19 AM

Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.


You misspelled "Spaced".
 
2012-09-27 01:41:27 AM

alienated: FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers


RED DWARF AND THE IT CROWD farkING RULES

British comedy is awesome. I would like to praise our English brethren for being some very funny farkers across the pond.
 
2012-09-27 01:46:22 AM
Oh, I forgot the inbetweeners- that is an odd duck of a show, but worth a check out, gov

Link
 
2012-09-27 01:59:37 AM
FTFA: "some words which Brits regard as typically American - including "candy", "the fall", and "diaper""

Brits don't say "the fall" because they cut down 90% of their trees. The country gets by with a couple hundred rakes.
 
2012-09-27 02:07:55 AM

Triumph: FTFA: "some words which Brits regard as typically American - including "candy", "the fall", and "diaper""

Brits don't say "the fall" because they cut down 90% of their trees. The country gets by with a couple hundred rakes.


Fall (as in the season) came from British English. It was pretty much gone from British English by WWII. We in America kept it alive and it is making a comeback in our grandmother's tongue.
 
2012-09-27 02:22:43 AM
Brilliant.
 
2012-09-27 02:23:33 AM
I never thought of "will do" as a British phrase.
 
2012-09-27 02:36:38 AM
I blame Top Gear

/and 22 years of working at Renaissance Festivals.
 
2012-09-27 02:50:50 AM

Shadow Blasko: /and 22 years of working at Renaissance Festivals.


lulz
 
2012-09-27 02:52:32 AM

brap: [i253.photobucket.com image 375x282]Brits need to put olives on the tips of their fingers it feels good AND IT'S THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE OF FUN!


Did you find this while looking for something else in a GIS, or are you do you actually have a "young girls playing with olives" folder?

/still lol'd, though
 
2012-09-27 03:08:11 AM

alienated: Shadow Blasko: /and 22 years of working at Renaissance Festivals.

lulz


Tis true...


BTW, you get 10,000 points for your name on your bio.

/Named my car Talyn.
 
2012-09-27 04:24:46 AM
The use of ginger in the US to describe red hair took off with publication of the first Harry Potter book in 1998,

Pretty sure it was South Park that took the word mainstream.

Americans use "expiration date" for the British sell-by date - the date by which supermarket food must be sold.

They are two different things. One is when the food should no longer be consumed, the other is when it should no longer be sold. I've heard the useage of both since the 80's.

Now, if American's start using the ugly term "snogging" for kissing, or "rough sleeper" for homeless people, then I'm going to shoot myself.
 
2012-09-27 05:46:57 AM
Forsooth.
 
2012-09-27 05:50:50 AM
It might be CALLED english, but its our language, we will take what we want, and you will like it.
 
2012-09-27 05:52:08 AM
No need to start sledging.
 
2012-09-27 05:53:40 AM

alienated: FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers


I think Cheers was American originally. You also forgot Blackadder and Fawlty Towers.

Obviously English is going to merge a lot more - there are plenty of Americanisms coming the other way as well of course, and no doubt as India/China grow and assuming they carry on using English for business then sooner or later lots more words from there will transfer across (British English already has quite a number of words derived from links with India, but most are old enough transfers for most people not to know their origins).
 
2012-09-27 05:54:32 AM

alienated: Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers


I think it depends on whether the show is "topical" or not.

2012 (an absurdist type comedy about the build up to the Olympics) may not have done as well as it was very topical, but very funny.

Rev and Miranda would probably do better.

Mrs Brown's Boys, if my parents are anything to judge by, would do brilliantly.

Mrs. Brown and the Mormons
 
2012-09-27 05:56:10 AM
The average American doesn't have all that good of a grasp on the English language anyway.

I blame hip/hop, texting, and MTV (not in that order).
 
2012-09-27 05:57:07 AM
Bally Jerry, pranged his kite right in the how's-your-father; hairy blighter, dicky-birded, feathered back on his sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harpers and caught his can in the Bertie.
 
2012-09-27 05:58:43 AM

SquiggsIN: The average American doesn't have all that good of a grasp on the English language anyway.


Irony?
 
2012-09-27 06:01:09 AM
What's all this, then?
 
2012-09-27 06:04:20 AM
Hate to break this to you Britain, but you talked more like we do prior to the Revolutionary War.

Not our fault you went all barmy on us after that.
 
2012-09-27 06:08:31 AM
I was in a thread the other day and was one of about half a dozen people recommending QI. Of course, I'm a Kiwi and we're a bit more culturally inclined towards British stuff, but we got a few converts. Enjoying the work of Stephen Fry is one of my personal litmus tests for whether I will probably like someone.
 
2012-09-27 06:09:55 AM
flowery twats.
 
2012-09-27 06:16:40 AM
As an Australian, I'm bombarded by both British and American culture all the time, so the distinctions here are lost on me.
 
2012-09-27 06:17:34 AM

thisispete: I was in a thread the other day and was one of about half a dozen people recommending QI. Of course, I'm a Kiwi and we're a bit more culturally inclined towards British stuff, but we got a few converts. Enjoying the work of Stephen Fry is one of my personal litmus tests for whether I will probably like someone.


You converted me on that show a few months back. Keep up the good fight!
 
2012-09-27 06:18:51 AM

Shadow Blasko: I blame Top Gear


Same here, and that's not a bad thing.
 
2012-09-27 06:26:25 AM
I was talking to my American friend (in Cambridge, UK but born and raised in the other Cambridge) and we were writing an email together; he asked me if we have 'dibs' over here (i.e., to 'have first dibs'). I was amazed because I always thought that 'dibs' was certainly an English thing, and not only that but a northern English thing. Having moved down south I suddenly realised that I had a vocabulary very different to my southern friends and I've got used to blaming our verbal misunderstandings on my Geordiespeak. From my internets research, it seems as though I might have picked up 'dibs' from American sources, somehow! Language is fascinating.
 
2012-09-27 06:28:02 AM
Go missing? Really?
 
2012-09-27 06:28:37 AM

Nick Nostril: Shadow Blasko: I blame Top Gear


Same here, and that's not a bad thing.


I find myself using "Oh Cock" and other James May-isms all the time.

"Give it the beans"... etc.

I have been saying boot instead of trunk since I was in Australia in 97. Just makes more sense. (as well as windscreen... Bonnet doesn't seem to fit, so I still say hood)
 
2012-09-27 06:30:57 AM
We're going to steal your words and there's nothing you can do about, you nancy boy tossers.
 
2012-09-27 06:31:32 AM
U wot m8
 
xcv
2012-09-27 06:33:51 AM

Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.


Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.
 
2012-09-27 06:34:26 AM

hubiestubert: Oddly enough, Americans have preserved in some isolated communities, a more "true" British dialect than the current wash of BBC English and urban dialects.

Even as English has changed here, influenced by waves of immigration, changed in the Caribbean, changed in Australia, English was doing the same thing in England as well. Modern dialects are NOT the same as they were, and English is a language that is wonderfully adaptive, in its ability to absorb linguistic elements from languages it's near. The ability to absorb loan words, to still maintain structures, and in some ways, the "backwoods" dialects of America, have preserved many older elements of English.

Mass communication has done some interesting things with transmission of linguistic elements. Cultures aren't preserving changes for as long, and there is an odd bit of homogenization between cultures, including between sub-cultures across nations. It's a neat time to be a linguist. Even with the spread of film and even radio, there was a rise for a sort of "standard" dialect. BBC Standard, American Standard, and others, as a sort of "official" dialect, and entirely artificial, as opposed to the regionals, and the rise of folks aping the dialects that they heard on radio and in films, it sort of slowed linguistic drift, but now that we have a wider range of dialects spread quickly with mass communication, and less than official channels where just about anyone can upload videos, music and more, we get to see a lot more diversity, and oddly enough, folks aping one another.

Like I said, neat time to be a linguist.


You said aping twice, you cunning linguist you.
 
2012-09-27 06:38:20 AM
I blame whatever has happened to me on working with Indians for the past 8 years. When you are around people who keep repeating the same phrases, it rubs off. Actual British people I have worked with were all in the Banking industry and I did not get along with them very well.
 
2012-09-27 06:38:41 AM
Cheers!
 
2012-09-27 06:45:59 AM
The one that annoys the hell out of me is the use of 'from' rather than 'starting' or 'as of':

From today, you can read this message online.
 
2012-09-27 06:46:58 AM

Rufus Lee King: All this is a new experiment in sharing cultures.

[25.media.tumblr.com image 448x339]


I've got a Porsche!
 
2012-09-27 06:48:19 AM

xcv: Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


I want to hit you.
 
2012-09-27 06:49:07 AM
Along with Top Gear and Monty Python, I also blame Eddie Izzard and Billy Connolly.
 
2012-09-27 06:51:50 AM
This thread is bollocks.

That is all....
 
2012-09-27 06:52:50 AM
Good.
 
2012-09-27 06:53:25 AM
I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.
 
2012-09-27 06:55:43 AM

DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.


You monster.
 
2012-09-27 06:57:04 AM

DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.


One of us! One of us! One of us!
 
2012-09-27 06:58:30 AM
I don't think there's any point in getting all mardy about it!
 
2012-09-27 07:01:57 AM

quickdraw: I like the phrase "get sorted"


Top one Nice one Get sorted.
 
2012-09-27 07:03:21 AM

Triumph: Brits don't say "the fall" because they cut down 90% of their trees.


If they hadn't, to build their navies, you would be calling it "automne" with a swishy French accent.
 
2012-09-27 07:04:06 AM
American English is the bee's knees. Anyone who uses "Britishisms" can just bugger off. Farking silly twats.
 
2012-09-27 07:04:14 AM

DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.


And I always spell "gray" as "grey". It looks less gay.
 
2012-09-27 07:06:05 AM
Mind you, American train stations still need some gaps to mind.
 
2012-09-27 07:08:56 AM

Rufus Lee King: I'm sure this is already known, but a person was, in the days of merrie olde England, not supposed to use the adjective "bloody", as it invoked the blood of Christ, which was considered blasphemy.


I don't see why. He got better, didn't he?
 
2012-09-27 07:12:28 AM

flamingboard: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

You monster.


Don't you mean "mounster"?
 
2012-09-27 07:12:34 AM
At least it's just British. When Australian "English" begins to creep into this country I'm going to start shooting people.
 
2012-09-27 07:13:03 AM

jmsvrsn: At least it's just British. When Australian "English" begins to creep into this country I'm going to start shooting people.


Good on you, mate.
 
2012-09-27 07:14:03 AM
Unlike in the UK, there is no anti-ginger prejudice in the US

img.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-27 07:14:25 AM

smadge1: As an Australian, I'm bombarded by both British and American culture all the time, so the distinctions here are lost on me.


Wheras I as an Englishman, am bombarded by so little Australian culture, sometimes I forget you even exist.
 
2012-09-27 07:15:16 AM

Kazan: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

and interacting with british people online.

FirstNationalBastard: Ambivalence: I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!

Also, "buggery" is a much more fun and friendly sounding word than sodomy.

Sodomy sounds scary and painful. Buggery sounds like something fun you do with your buds after a night of drinking

agreed


Only if you're Greek or Turkish.
 
2012-09-27 07:22:45 AM
does this mean eventually I don't need to explain to visiting Americans the difference between 2 and fark you?
 
2012-09-27 07:25:17 AM
My boss from my last job was British. He and I had so much fun together when it came to cultural differences. The one we'd argue the most about was the gesture for "two", b/c I'd put up two fingers while I was talking reflexively, and of course, in Britain, it's a way of flipping someone off. He's always bring it up when I did it, and I'd always tell him "when in Rome". I hated that job, but he was the best boss I've ever had.
 
2012-09-27 07:26:41 AM

jmsvrsn: At least it's just British. When Australian "English" begins to creep into this country I'm going to start shooting people.


No worries.
 
2012-09-27 07:27:20 AM
Ambivalence: I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!

I love the resurgence of this word...when I was a kid in the 1970's, it rhymed with "cot" and sounded filthy and offensive, right up there with the "C-word." But once I heard Ricky Gervaise pronounce it as rhyming with "cat" it became harmless and fun.

Funny, that.
 
2012-09-27 07:27:58 AM
The writer does understand we are using the same language so it should share some expressions, right?
 
2012-09-27 07:29:42 AM
I just submitted a comment that was almost entirely swear words, and it didn't appear. Does Fark have some kind of "profanity overload trip" built in? (or "circuit breaker" as we would call it in the UK)
 
2012-09-27 07:31:37 AM
Until recently, I thought "Gone pear shaped" was an American phrase. I was really surprised to find out it was a British-ism.

Also, this guy shows Mitt how it's done: You "plebs".
 
2012-09-27 07:33:20 AM
30 years in the UK, 10 years in USA. I forget which spelling and phrases are which. Occasionally someone reminds me. Usually people get my drift.
 
2012-09-27 07:34:36 AM

xria: alienated: FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers

I think Cheers was American originally. You also forgot Blackadder and Fawlty Towers.

Obviously English is going to merge a lot more - there are plenty of Americanisms coming the other way as well of course, and no doubt as India/China grow and assuming they carry on using English for business then sooner or later lots more words from there will transfer across (British English already has quite a number of words derived from links with India, but most are old enough transfers for most people not to know their origins).


Fawlty Towers gets a nod from the hotel & restaurant folks, but everyone else I've shown it to just didn't seem to get it.

Some of my other favorites have been Are You Being Served (and I liked Grace and Favour too, but I guess I'm weird), Red Dwarf, The IT Crowd, Blackadder, Vicar of Dibley, etc. I also find the British versions of Being Human and The Office much better than the American ones. Personally, I've never liked AbFab or Doctor Who, but to each his own.

Simon Pegg has done a bit on the film front as well. I know people who hate "British shows" but love Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz. Sure, they're a bit Americanised, but they've still got that British background & humor that just makes Americans go "WTF did he say?"

I have to admit... "Britishisms" have crept into my speech, probably from all the British shows over the years. Strangely enough, it's sneaking into my spelling as well. I constantly have to go back to get rid of extra u's, check for the s/z switches (recognised, etc), et al.
 
2012-09-27 07:36:52 AM

Jgok: check for the s/z switches (recognised, etc), et al.


for fun, start saying "zed" instead of "zee"

Once that one's in there, it's hard to go back. I was correcting myself all over the place on my last visit to my parents.
 
2012-09-27 07:41:41 AM
Are you suggesting coconuts migrate???
 
2012-09-27 07:43:58 AM
Any bird fancy a shag?

I'm also noticing American media omitting the definite article more often, such as "Fredbox is in hospital after asking if any bird fancies a shag"
 
2012-09-27 07:47:12 AM

enry: The one that annoys the hell out of me is the use of 'from' rather than 'starting' or 'as of':

From today, you can read this message online.


I detest the use of "off of" by Americans instead of 'off' or 'from'. The word 'from' seems to have disappeared from their vocabulary.
 
2012-09-27 07:52:54 AM
Well, this is all a bit confusing, innit?
 
2012-09-27 07:55:17 AM
Throw another shrimp on the barbie
 
2012-09-27 07:56:16 AM

theoutlaw: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

One of us! One of us! One of us!


To be fair, I come by it honestly, as my mother is Irish.

0Icky0: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

And I always spell "gray" as "grey". It looks less gay.


www4.pictures.zimbio.com

Doesn't have a problem with that.
 
2012-09-27 07:58:38 AM
First one to mention rogering?

\makes me giggle every time I see it.
 
2012-09-27 08:03:14 AM
I can't read this article without hearing it in this guy's voice.

images4.wikia.nocookie.net
Now, neither can you.
 
2012-09-27 08:07:22 AM

TV's Vinnie: I can't read this article without hearing it in this guy's voice.

[images4.wikia.nocookie.net image 427x464]
Now, neither can you.


I can. I have no idea what that guy's voice sounds like.
 
2012-09-27 08:08:26 AM

DjangoStonereaver: theoutlaw: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

One of us! One of us! One of us!

To be fair, I come by it honestly, as my mother is Irish.0Icky0: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

And I always spell "gray" as "grey". It looks less gay.

[www4.pictures.zimbio.com image 419x594]

Doesn't have a problem with that.


strange i always thought grey looked more ghey. in fact it's only 1 letter away from ghey.
 
2012-09-27 08:09:00 AM
Does this mean Niall Ferguson, Piers Morgan, Tina Brown, Simon Cowell, and Gordon Ramsay will be out of work, as Americans lose their fascination with the Brit-speak and realize these twats are just frothing out utter rubbish?
 
2012-09-27 08:10:05 AM
I blame my Canuck mother and grandparents, who typically rattled off "bloody", "arse", "knackered" and other sorts of phrases that made some of my friends scratch their heads in confusion. And Monty Python....

/"oh, 'ad enough, eh?"
 
2012-09-27 08:11:10 AM
I've got blisters on me fingahs!!!
 
2012-09-27 08:15:34 AM
it's like the opposite of marmite. nobody loves or hates it. it's just there.
 
2012-09-27 08:16:20 AM
i can even remember a time when fark was an american site

pish posh
 
2012-09-27 08:17:25 AM
I blame Madonna.
 
2012-09-27 08:17:55 AM

Jon iz teh kewl: it's like the opposite of marmite. nobody loves or hates it. it's just there.


Wait. I thought you either loved or hated marmite. Am I getting my ad campaigns wrong?
 
2012-09-27 08:22:13 AM

EyeballKid: Jon iz teh kewl: it's like the opposite of marmite. nobody loves or hates it. it's just there.

Wait. I thought you either loved or hated marmite. Am I getting my ad campaigns wrong?


Oh, "opposite." Sorry, I guess I should start drinking my coffee, then.
 
2012-09-27 08:29:58 AM
FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.
 
2012-09-27 08:31:39 AM
Jesus christ.. I wish people would stop trying to halt the evolution of language. LANGUAGE CHANGES OVER TIME. get the fark over it and stop complaining about every new thing like some sort of farking troglodyte.
 
2012-09-27 08:33:41 AM

TheOriginalEd: Jesus christ.. I wish people would stop trying to halt the evolution of language. LANGUAGE CHANGES OVER TIME. get the fark over it and stop complaining about every new thing like some sort of farking troglodyte.


www.file-extensions.org
 
2012-09-27 08:34:12 AM
Quick crash course for you Septics...

bollocks = bad
the bollocks = good
the dog's bollocks = very good
 
2012-09-27 08:35:10 AM
Not me. I try to sound irish whenever I can.

/Ya dozy cow!
 
2012-09-27 08:37:31 AM
This thread is as thick as two short planks
 
2012-09-27 08:37:52 AM

Ikam: FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.


Funniest damn thing I ever heard accent wise was a guy from Bristol saying Chicago (shi-car-go)

/love the Bristol accent, really
 
2012-09-27 08:38:36 AM

fredbox: Any bird fancy a shag?

I'm also noticing American media omitting the definite article more often, such as "Fredbox is in hospital after asking if any bird fancies a shag"


Also, you write to someone and you may do this on a specified day.
Repeat after me : "I wrote to Ted on Monday", not "I wrote Ted Monday".

/math(ematic)s is plural, you flids.
 
2012-09-27 08:39:06 AM
I don't mind most of it, but it bothers me when brits put the accent on the wrong syllable.

Not going to start saying "pins" for legs.
 
2012-09-27 08:39:24 AM

Jesus Burnt My Hotdog: Quick crash course for you Septics...

bollocks = bad
the bollocks = good
the dog's bollocks = very good


shiat = bad
the shiat = good
the dog's shiat = ... ok it breaks down here and I can't be arsed to find a better one

Oi!
 
2012-09-27 08:39:55 AM
Dwanky clarts.
 
2012-09-27 08:40:48 AM

stellarossa: 30 years in the UK, 10 years in USA. I forget which spelling and phrases are which. Occasionally someone reminds me. Usually people get my drift.


Sometimes I find myself thinking: I can't remember if I say "shed-ule" or "sked-ule"...
 
2012-09-27 08:41:04 AM

Jgok: I have to admit... "Britishisms" have crept into my speech, probably from all the British shows over the years. Strangely enough, it's sneaking into my spelling as well. I constantly have to go back to get rid of extra u's, check for the s/z switches (recognised, etc), et al.


The removal of u's can purely be based on Noah Webster of course, and I guess I can see the point, but of course it doesn't help when the two cultures start merging again, but I guess he can't be blamed for not predicting the globalization of culture would come so far. The s/z switch strangely enough isn't actually an American/British thing, but actually a long running issue between Oxford and Cambridge Universities and their sphere's of influence (certain dictionaries, their book publishers, and beyond).

I have been on the internet way too long I guess because I can seamlessly switch between US and UK spelling mode. Doesn't work with the choice of words to match the culture as is being discussed in the linked article - just would be too much effort to try and track down which words you pick up are used in which cultures and try and remember that when you are writing. If you are on the internet then finding out what a word you don't understand means is only a click or two away at most, so it seems a trivial thing to pay much attention to (unless you are a sociologisit/linquist that can use the flow of words between cultures to make inferences about broader changes or whatever).
 
2012-09-27 08:46:06 AM

smadge1: As an Australian, I'm bombarded by both British and American culture all the time, so the distinctions here are lost on me.


Same. Apart from "snog" and "college", they just read like simple synonyms to me, neither British nor American.
 
2012-09-27 08:46:15 AM
I blame Billie Joe Armstrong.

Bloody poser.
 
2012-09-27 08:46:53 AM
WTF!? I've heard or been using most of those for my entire life and I'm 50.
 
2012-09-27 08:47:24 AM

Doctor Jan Itor:
shiat = bad
the shiat = good
the dog's shiat = ... ok it breaks down here and I can't be arsed to find a better one

Oi!


Why Americans think faeces is something to aspire to I have no idea. At least one can be proud of one's testicles.
 
2012-09-27 08:47:32 AM
I blame Clarkson and Top Gear...
 
2012-09-27 08:51:15 AM

Rufus Lee King: thisone: does this mean eventually I don't need to explain to visiting Americans the difference between 2 and fark you?

Well, I'e sort of used this earlier in the thread, but WTH?

[s2.postimage.org image 180x144]


Something exclusively British - the 2 finger salute. The British, OTOH, think it's universal. Completely oblivious, these guys sometimes. Originates in some battle against the French. The French used to chop off the only 2 useful fingers off of any captured English bowman; index and middle finger. Quite humane, really, for the day. Giving those two fingers (across the battlefield) meant: Neener neener neener, I've still got them.
 
2012-09-27 08:56:14 AM
www.igorwaver.com

rpnidev.files.wordpress.com


Oh no, even the meme's are turning decidedly British.
 
2012-09-27 08:58:03 AM
Pissed/ pissed off. Gets me all the time as often when an American says pissed meaning 'angry', 'drunk' fits as well.

"He was so pissed when he crashed his car."

"He was so pissed off when he crashed his car because he was pissed on Babycham."
 
2012-09-27 08:58:50 AM
Trousers? Go back and look at old American footage from the 30s-60s. People will say trousers (or slacks or dungarees, depending on the fabric) They won't say pants because that means underwear. Referring to trousers as pants is a newer phenomenon. The fashion went from kickers to longer trousers and they were called, in America, knickers and then trousers. It makes the rest of the article suspect.
 
2012-09-27 09:03:10 AM
Pants is a funny one. We use pants as an abbreviation for 'underpants', you use pants as an abbreviation of 'pantaloons'. Underpants must come from 'under-pantaloons' though.

Of course to call something pants over here means it's rubbish.
 
2012-09-27 09:11:41 AM
Sound like a bunch of cheeky gits to me.
 
2012-09-27 09:12:12 AM

xcv: Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


TCP/IP PUNCH!
 
2012-09-27 09:16:28 AM

Rufus Lee King: Cor, I'm farking my posts all up.


Sit daahn an' 'ave a cup o' tea guv'nor.
 
2012-09-27 09:25:49 AM

alienated: Oh, I forgot the inbetweeners- that is an odd duck of a show, but worth a check out, gov

Link


The Inbetweeners is good, but not as good (IMHO) as We Are Klang, and if you ever get the chance, watch Greg Davies stand up show, Throwing Cheeseballs at a Dog.
 
2012-09-27 09:28:20 AM

Wasilla Hillbilly: I've got blisters on me fingahs!!!


this was not lost on me. A++++
 
2012-09-27 09:28:43 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python


This. I've been watching British shows since the 70s when Channel 13 ran Monty Python & Channel 11 (or was it 9?) ran Benny Hill & Dave Allen. Later, I got hooked on Are You Being Served, Chef!, and AbFab. Now I watch as much BBC America as I do any other channel.

I'm sure a lot of the language transfer has to do with Harry Potter and even Gordon Ramsay. When you have that much British in your pop culture, it's bound to rub off. I've caught myself saying spot on, pear-shaped, brilliant, gobsmacked... I'm sure to most I probably come off as pretentious but I really can't help it--it's not intentional.
 
2012-09-27 09:29:11 AM
I think that with reference to advertising using "u" (colours, etc).. there's the factor that it's cheaper to make one advertisement that covers as much ground as possible, minimizing the adaptation to local areas makes sense when you look at it that way... The U is also present in Canada, which means you get an extra country by using it.

The U, in England and Canada, is perceived as correct usage (obviously), so if it's not there it gives a negative connotation to the statement used.

In America, two things happen.. One, folks suspect you're being a little snobbish by using it, or worldly, depending upon the level of hipster. Two, it sticks in your head a little as being unusual, which of course, is desirable in an advertisement. Not having the "U" means nothing "extra" to the Americans. Though if the President spelled color with a U, we might kinda start wondering about who's running the show.

Also, translation services around the world often have a tendency to cater to British English, rather than American English, as perhaps a perception that they are interchangeable, though the British English is perceived as "most correct" by outsiders for the same reason Spanish in Spain is considered the "most correct" version of Spanish to learn.
 
2012-09-27 09:34:05 AM

Ikam: FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.


Like people actually IN or even from the Manhattan area. I'm from Jersey City and, although I've (thankfully) lost 99% of that accent, I don't pronounce the t's in Manhattan or the 1st t in important. Nobody in my area does. You don't start to hear it until you get down by the Philly area.
 
2012-09-27 09:39:28 AM
I was just thinking about this the other day as I was lobbing Bob the Knob across the gob.
 
OKO
2012-09-27 09:41:16 AM
Threads like this make me Rabid Dog so, so much.

Even a Pommie can be a good bugger, now and then.
 
2012-09-27 09:45:11 AM
It's ok limeys, you'll all be speaking arabic soon enough.
 
2012-09-27 09:48:46 AM

Dead-Guy: I think that with reference to advertising using "u" (colours, etc).. there's the factor that it's cheaper to make one advertisement that covers as much ground as possible, minimizing the adaptation to local areas makes sense when you look at it that way... The U is also present in Canada, which means you get an extra country by using it.

The U, in England and Canada, is perceived as correct usage (obviously), so if it's not there it gives a negative connotation to the statement used.

In America, two things happen.. One, folks suspect you're being a little snobbish by using it, or worldly, depending upon the level of hipster. Two, it sticks in your head a little as being unusual, which of course, is desirable in an advertisement. Not having the "U" means nothing "extra" to the Americans. Though if the President spelled color with a U, we might kinda start wondering about who's running the show.

Also, translation services around the world often have a tendency to cater to British English, rather than American English, as perhaps a perception that they are interchangeable, though the British English is perceived as "most correct" by outsiders for the same reason Spanish in Spain is considered the "most correct" version of Spanish to learn.


In a previous job I was told to use the American spelling for 'Localisation' (z in place of the s) as our American clients thought we, a localisation company, couldn't spell 'localization'.
 
2012-09-27 09:50:59 AM
I will never, ever say "jag-yu-ar."
 
2012-09-27 09:51:14 AM
Bollocks to this.


I say 'bloody hell' a lot. Doesn't mean I'm trying to be 'British'
 
2012-09-27 09:52:18 AM
I'll still keep my job translating Manchester English into Toronto Canadian for tourists from Texas.


I blame this guy.


i7.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-27 09:52:40 AM

hubiestubert: Oddly enough, Americans have preserved in some isolated communities, a more "true" British dialect than the current wash of BBC English and urban dialects.

Even as English has changed here, influenced by waves of immigration, changed in the Caribbean, changed in Australia, English was doing the same thing in England as well. Modern dialects are NOT the same as they were, and English is a language that is wonderfully adaptive, in its ability to absorb linguistic elements from languages it's near. The ability to absorb loan words, to still maintain structures, and in some ways, the "backwoods" dialects of America, have preserved many older elements of English.

Mass communication has done some interesting things with transmission of linguistic elements. Cultures aren't preserving changes for as long, and there is an odd bit of homogenization between cultures, including between sub-cultures across nations. It's a neat time to be a linguist. Even with the spread of film and even radio, there was a rise for a sort of "standard" dialect. BBC Standard, American Standard, and others, as a sort of "official" dialect, and entirely artificial, as opposed to the regionals, and the rise of folks aping the dialects that they heard on radio and in films, it sort of slowed linguistic drift, but now that we have a wider range of dialects spread quickly with mass communication, and less than official channels where just about anyone can upload videos, music and more, we get to see a lot more diversity, and oddly enough, folks aping one another.

Like I said, neat time to be a linguist.


When British linguists want to take a better guess at how the Great Vowel Shift played out, they go to little barrier islands off the Mid-Atlantic states, or climb into the Appalachian hills. Suddenly, recitations of Shakespeare rhyme better.

Shakespeare wot loike he wuz spoke: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s

It's fascinating to hear and the case that "this is London English 400 years ago" is trechantly argued.
 
2012-09-27 09:54:10 AM
Well, here's some "American English" for the article writer: Shut the fark up, biatch.

Ive been saying "will do" since I was 8...before I knew British people even existed.
 
2012-09-27 09:54:49 AM

jigoro: I will never, ever say "jag-yu-ar."


but will you say "ahh-DEE-dahs" or "nyk"

/I do like annoying people with the US pronunciation of Adidas
//and saying Nike is a US company, I think I know how to pronounce it tyvm :)
//I have no friends
 
2012-09-27 09:58:00 AM
Im just gonna go around saying 'Ni!" to old women.
 
2012-09-27 09:58:43 AM

xcv: Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


We need to remove this post IMMEDIATELY before Hollywood gets buzz and puts this into production. I will not let Shia LaBeouf rape the Doctor the way he raped Indiana Jones.

Crystal skull? More like crystal skull-farked. AMIRITE?
 
2012-09-27 09:58:47 AM
I find myself using British words far too often and it drives me crazy. I guess from my time living in New Zealand and now most of my expat friends are British. I even started spelling words incorrectly but corrected that nasty habit.
 
2012-09-27 09:59:45 AM
Whatever you do, don't go for the "banger in the mouth."

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-09-27 10:00:01 AM

xcv: Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


Masterful trolling, dude.
 
2012-09-27 10:13:35 AM
hah, forgot "mewling quim" was in The Avengers.
 
2012-09-27 10:15:19 AM

xcv: Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


You should be beaten with an oar for just coming up with that.
 
2012-09-27 10:16:27 AM
BBC presenters(!) are weird. They keep telling me the President's name is Bear Rack Obammar. I don't know who that is.
 
2012-09-27 10:18:48 AM

jigoro: I will never, ever say "jag-yu-ar."


As long as you also don't say jagwire.
 
2012-09-27 10:21:51 AM
<b><a href="http://www.fark.com/comments/7349878/79648925#c79648925" target="_blank">OKO</a>:</b> <i>Threads like this make me Rabid Dog so, so much.</i>

Threads like this make us ALL Rabid Dog.
 
2012-09-27 10:22:05 AM

LDM90: jigoro: I will never, ever say "jag-yu-ar."

As long as you also don't say jagwire.


Jag-war?
 
2012-09-27 10:23:05 AM

impaler: Brilliant.


Bwilleeint.
 
2012-09-27 10:25:04 AM

jigoro: I will never, ever say "jag-yu-ar."


Or al-oo-min-ee-um.
 
2012-09-27 10:26:05 AM

Bedstead Polisher: LDM90: jigoro: I will never, ever say "jag-yu-ar."

As long as you also don't say jagwire.

Jag-war?


That is correct.
 
2012-09-27 10:27:16 AM

FirstNationalBastard: Ambivalence: I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!

Also, "buggery" is a much more fun and friendly sounding word than sodomy.

Sodomy sounds scary and painful. Buggery sounds like something fun you do with your buds after a night of drinking


What you do is your business.

/NTTAWWT
 
2012-09-27 10:28:31 AM
THIS IS AN OUTRAGE!

We must act now to defend the purity of our hick-speak and not allow it to be polluted by these foreign infidels, with their pretenses and linguistic affectations.
 
2012-09-27 10:28:46 AM

Valiente: When British linguists want to take a better guess at how the Great Vowel Shift played out, they go to little barrier islands off the Mid-Atlantic states, or climb into the Appalachian hills. Suddenly, recitations of Shakespeare rhyme better.

Shakespeare wot loike he wuz spoke: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s

It's fascinating to hear and the case that "this is London English 400 years ago" is trechantly argued.


That was a great piece.
 
2012-09-27 10:29:40 AM

Rufus Lee King: What bothers me is that I'm sixteen, right? Old enough to have...intercourse...with the partner of my choice, yet I still can't go drinkn' in pubs...

And if you filmed yourself doing it you'd have to wait another two years before you could watch it.

 
2012-09-27 10:32:00 AM

xcv: Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet?


Oh, they tried to give us an American version of Doctor Who...
 
2012-09-27 10:32:34 AM
The two that annoy me the most are pluralizing "math" and using words like "hospital" by themselves. It makes me want to bomb them.

It is not "hospital", it is "THE hospital". Do they also go to Store as well?
 
2012-09-27 10:33:18 AM
We got Aussieisms creeping into conversation at my office. You can hear Americans saying "no worries, mate" throughout the day.
 
2012-09-27 10:33:34 AM
Nah, I'm mostly sober now.
 
2012-09-27 10:35:11 AM

Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.


Smeghead.
 
2012-09-27 10:35:12 AM
I catch myself saying "sort out" when referring to problems, and I do blame my constant watching of BBC America.

/ Not my fault they have a lot of good shows
// The U.S. Being Human is better than the U.K. version, though
/// The complete opposite goes for Top Gear.
 
2012-09-27 10:37:07 AM

thisone: Ikam: FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.

Funniest damn thing I ever heard accent wise was a guy from Bristol saying Chicago (shi-car-go)

/love the Bristol accent, really



Thanks (or not) to my upbringing, I've been told that I sport an accent that my fellow mid-westerners have described as "an unholy mix of Chicago and northeast" (yes, I'm aware that there are several northeastern accents, but usually the people commenting on my accent seem not to be) and I spent a few months living in the UK. One of the funnier things I heard was their attempts at my accent after a few drinks, and I'm pretty sure one of funnier things they heard was my attempt at theirs after the same amount of drinks, as while I'm fairly good at recognizing accents, I suck at imitating them, especially since most Brits can drink me under the table and on a few occasions, tried to.
 
2012-09-27 10:37:22 AM

Valiente: Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.

Masterful trolling, dude.


Definitely well done because I can absolutely see someone hating the viewing public enough to make The Beef The Doctor. Rihanna wouldn't be a ridiculous stretch considering Martha as the prototype.

The other two, I pray, are too far beyond the imagination of the most sadistic television exec to consider. Hopefully...
 
2012-09-27 10:37:52 AM
This thread is the dog's bollocks.
 
2012-09-27 10:41:10 AM

FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?


And the reboot of Doctor Who.
 
2012-09-27 10:43:16 AM
news.bbcimg.co.uk

Cool image. Shows how we are using 'snog' to mean kiss and 'ginger' to refer to a spice. Because previously it was a Brittish spice that only the Brittish ate.
 
2012-09-27 10:44:25 AM
Crikey!
 
2012-09-27 10:46:08 AM

JackieRabbit: THIS IS AN OUTRAGE!

We must act now to defend the purity of our hick-speak and not allow it to be polluted by these foreign infidels, with their pretenses and linguistic affectations.


profile.ak.fbcdn.net
 
2012-09-27 10:48:14 AM

JeffDenver: The two that annoy me the most are pluralizing "math" and using words like "hospital" by themselves. It makes me want to bomb them.

It is not "hospital", it is "THE hospital". Do they also go to Store as well?


u don't go to "the church"
u go to church

their hospital is like our church.
ours will be soon if ObamaCare becomes law.
 
2012-09-27 10:54:47 AM
Meh. Wake me up when we start using the word "fanny" like the Brits do.
 
2012-09-27 11:01:16 AM
My 12 year old has been calling it "the loo" for 3 or 4 years. She thinks it is funny. The part that is funny is seeing the looks on peoples faces when a kid walks in, in the middle of Kansas and asks to use the loo.

She likes knickers too, uses it any chance she gets.
 
2012-09-27 11:02:24 AM

untaken_name: flamingboard: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

You monster.

Don't you mean "mounster"?


No, the correct spelling is monstre.

/just ask John Majour or Margaret Thatchre
 
2012-09-27 11:05:31 AM
Actually, I think is the solution to a problem as Americans don't mind speaking like Brits and generally think it's fun, whereas Brits go positively apeshiat over supposed "Americanisms".

Brits: Overreacting to shiat since 1773.
 
2012-09-27 11:09:24 AM

hubiestubert: Valiente: When British linguists want to take a better guess at how the Great Vowel Shift played out, they go to little barrier islands off the Mid-Atlantic states, or climb into the Appalachian hills. Suddenly, recitations of Shakespeare rhyme better.

Shakespeare wot loike he wuz spoke: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s

It's fascinating to hear and the case that "this is London English 400 years ago" is trechantly argued.

That was a great piece.


I had a feeling you'd enjoy it, and I didn't even have to write my post in IPA.

I had an English teacher in high school who was either the son of Danish immigrants to Canada or came here as a kid (maybe a WWII refugee thing). Because he spoke Danish, he had a leg up on Anglo-Saxon, and eventually mastered Middle English.

So we had recitations of Chaucer "as he was spake". Great stuff, if hard, at first, to follow. That naturally introduced Caxton's spelling innovations, the Great Vowel Shift and the concept of wandering rhotacisms and how the American accent of the northern Atlantic states is still similar to parts of East Anglia today. My favourite Fuddite is Lucy Worsley, a jolly hockey sticks sort of historian on the BBC with the least flattering haircut on Earth: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_Worsley

I was lucky to go to high school when there were still teachers unafraid to bring university-level subject matter to the classroom, and there was still enough money in the system to allow such intellectual roaming.
 
2012-09-27 11:15:38 AM
Top Gear, Dr. Who, and FARK links to Daily Mail.

Just yesterday I was trying to describe my friend's ex-wife to someone, and the only thing I could think of was "chav".

We need a word like that over here.
 
2012-09-27 11:19:05 AM

fickenchucker: Top Gear, Dr. Who, and FARK links to Daily Mail.

Just yesterday I was trying to describe my friend's ex-wife to someone, and the only thing I could think of was "chav".

We need a word like that over here.


Does 'skank' not work for ya?
 
2012-09-27 11:20:27 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

Are You Being Served? and Keeping Up Appearances were both pretty popular

/personally I was a big fan of Waiting For God, too


Fawlty Towers!
 
2012-09-27 11:32:14 AM

brigid_fitch: Ikam: FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.

Like people actually IN or even from the Manhattan area. I'm from Jersey City and, although I've (thankfully) lost 99% of that accent, I don't pronounce the t's in Manhattan or the 1st t in important. Nobody in my area does. You don't start to hear it until you get down by the Philly area.


I'm from Connecticut and I don't know anyone from this part of the state who pronounces the t's in 'Manhattan', though most people seem to pronounce 'important' with a very soft t at the end. Parts of CT lean towards what I call the Massachusetts pronunciation, while others are very influenced by NYC.
 
2012-09-27 11:32:24 AM

xcv: Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


Blasphemy!! Especially considering Doctor Who is still running, and doing smashingly well.

/Canadian with British husband
 
2012-09-27 11:34:10 AM
Ooh arr.
 
2012-09-27 11:37:49 AM
Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

This is nothing new for those of use from New York/New Jersey.
 
2012-09-27 11:39:27 AM

Valiente: hubiestubert: Valiente: When British linguists want to take a better guess at how the Great Vowel Shift played out, they go to little barrier islands off the Mid-Atlantic states, or climb into the Appalachian hills. Suddenly, recitations of Shakespeare rhyme better.

Shakespeare wot loike he wuz spoke: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s

It's fascinating to hear and the case that "this is London English 400 years ago" is trechantly argued.

That was a great piece.

I had a feeling you'd enjoy it, and I didn't even have to write my post in IPA.

I had an English teacher in high school who was either the son of Danish immigrants to Canada or came here as a kid (maybe a WWII refugee thing). Because he spoke Danish, he had a leg up on Anglo-Saxon, and eventually mastered Middle English.

So we had recitations of Chaucer "as he was spake". Great stuff, if hard, at first, to follow. That naturally introduced Caxton's spelling innovations, the Great Vowel Shift and the concept of wandering rhotacisms and how the American accent of the northern Atlantic states is still similar to parts of East Anglia today. My favourite Fuddite is Lucy Worsley, a jolly hockey sticks sort of historian on the BBC with the least flattering haircut on Earth: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_Worsley

I was lucky to go to high school when there were still teachers unafraid to bring university-level subject matter to the classroom, and there was still enough money in the system to allow such intellectual roaming.


I was lucky enough to have two great professors at UMF. Karl Franson was a brilliant Shakespeare scholar, and while he was perhaps the most buttoned down Ivy League educated, prep school accented wee man clad in Kelly Green possible, he loved the language, not just of Shakespeare, but Bunyon as well. He taught these works as living pieces, still. Clad perhaps in armor of a language that had shifted beneath them, but reaching out from that past into today, with power and majesty. A tiny wee man, barely 5'4" and spritely in his Boston Brahmin accented ways, he instilled a love of that language. Jay Hoar, who is sadly no longer with us, was the only member of the UMF faculty to have a building named for him while he was still alive. He had an amazing career as a linguist. Jay could place folks within 50 miles of where they were born, or at least lived during their childhood. An amazing ear for accent and dialect, he made it a regular exercise to speak to folks and infer where they'd come from within minutes, by their choice of words, their accent, and he was startlingly precise. He also loved English as a living language, in all its eccentricity and oddness. His "Ain't is a Beautiful Word" was a lesson he did every year, and it was one of those classes that you'd ask to sit in on, again and again, because it was an eloquent and bold and unabashedly fond look at how English is used. Not enshrined and venerable, but working, breathing, always in motion. Use creates accents and dialects. They form, and those bonds help form communities, identities, bridges gulfs between people. What occurs when cultures meet, and how those traditions are preserved, that is the story of English as a language. America, for its vast melting pot, created very much Americanisms, that spread across the globe, and many more were preserved and still used today in pockets, a testament to the inventiveness and flexibility and sheer exuberance with the tongue. These two men helped form a love of the language, in all its boisterous and sometimes reckless abandon. For both, the language's joy wasn't in keeping it pristine and ensconced in some dry bin, but in its use. Its growth. Knowing how Old English became Middle English to Modern English was a journey, not just of words and accent, but of the sweep of history, how a people grew and changed, and their language did the same thing. The literature is a snapshot not just of the language of the time, but of its people and their journeys.
 
2012-09-27 11:40:03 AM
The vocabulary is probably becoming more similar, but I've read that the actual accents continue to diverge. A type of British accent that an American has never heard before can be very difficult to understand, and I'd guess it would work the other way around too, if it wasn't for the fact that Brits have been so exposed to various American accents from movies.
 
2012-09-27 11:42:20 AM
Meight! After playing Eve Online for 6 years, it's only natural.
 
2012-09-27 11:49:32 AM

Need_MindBleach: The vocabulary is probably becoming more similar, but I've read that the actual accents continue to diverge. A type of British accent that an American has never heard before can be very difficult to understand, and I'd guess it would work the other way around too, if it wasn't for the fact that Brits have been so exposed to various American accents from movies.


I discovered a bunch of British podcasts done by comedians. When I first starting listening to them I couldn't understand quite a bit. It didn't take long to pick it up though and listening to them became a regular thing at my dull job. I hardly ever watch TV but I do like British comedy, as most dorks here do. And in my WoW guild there are a substantial number of British and Australian members, rarely do we do a raid without at least two foreign accents coming over the VOIP we use.

So I guess I'm really exposed to it. Is it any wonder some of that doesn't creep into my own language? Funny thing is I'll be in conversation (see right there?) with a friend and unconsciously throw in a British way of saying things or slang and later I see hear them use it as well. Overall, I'm okay with that. I think it's really cool that us English-speaking countries are, in some ways, closer on a personal level than we ever have.
 
2012-09-27 11:51:26 AM

20/20: I don't mind most of it, but it bothers me when brits put the accent on the wrong syllable.

Not going to start saying "pins" for legs.


Very much this. My british hubby pronounces Saskatchewan as SASka CHEWin

/also hate how he says oregano
 
2012-09-27 11:53:37 AM

Smoky Dragon Dish: Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

This is nothing new for those of use from New York/New Jersey.


I'm pretty sure this is nothing new to 90% of American dialects, and the author didn't exactly consult a linguist on this one.
 
2012-09-27 12:00:37 PM

LDM90: Bedstead Polisher: LDM90: jigoro: I will never, ever say "jag-yu-ar."

As long as you also don't say jagwire.

Jag-war?

That is incorrect.


FTFY.
 
2012-09-27 12:03:47 PM

Milk D: Wasilla Hillbilly: I've got blisters on me fingahs!!!

this was not lost on me. A++++


Nor I! A++++++++++++++++++
 
2012-09-27 12:06:25 PM
"There was a dustup on the flyover this afternoon"
 
2012-09-27 12:09:18 PM

hubiestubert: I was lucky enough to have two great professors at UMF.


Why did they not teach you how to break a wall of text up into paragraphs?
 
2012-09-27 12:17:55 PM

Need_MindBleach: Smoky Dragon Dish: Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

This is nothing new for those of use from New York/New Jersey.

I'm pretty sure this is nothing new to 90% of American dialects, and the author didn't exactly consult a linguist on this one.


I would agree, but I am no linguist either.

/It's Boo'n, not Boonton.
 
2012-09-27 12:18:55 PM
I blame Red Dwarf and Keeping up Appearances. Hyacinth rules.
 
2012-09-27 12:21:34 PM
I also blame this, the Death Star canteen:

Link
 
2012-09-27 12:26:11 PM

trappedspirit: fickenchucker: Top Gear, Dr. Who, and FARK links to Daily Mail.

Just yesterday I was trying to describe my friend's ex-wife to someone, and the only thing I could think of was "chav".

We need a word like that over here.

Does 'skank' not work for ya?


No. You can have chavs in both sexes, and chavs, while potentially indiscrimately promiscuous, are more about being stupid, violent and cheaply fashion-conscious while unashamedly sucking at the tit of the welfare state.

I've never heard "skank" applied to a male, although it's hard to determine why not. "Manho", maybe? "Slot"?
 
2012-09-27 12:29:10 PM

WalMartian: Milk D: Wasilla Hillbilly: I've got blisters on me fingahs!!!

this was not lost on me. A++++

Nor I! A++++++++++++++++++


Thank you girl. It's all too much.
 
2012-09-27 12:31:23 PM

Rufus Lee King: Rufus Lee King: When will the government reaise, right, that we youth have something important to contribute to society?

I should stress, though, that you do have to to have a degree... 

/pardon me while I seduce your parrot


No parrots here squire. My leopard gecko, on the other hand, is a saucy minx. A nod's as good a wink to a blind bat if you know what I mean.
 
2012-09-27 12:31:58 PM

Zizzowop: I also blame this, the Death Star canteen:

Link


Genius.

"I'm your boss."
"You're Mr. Stevens?"
 
2012-09-27 12:35:14 PM
It's perfectly ordinary banter, Squiffy. Bally Jerry, pranged his kite right in the how's-your-father; hairy blighter, dicky-birded, feathered back on his sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harpers and caught his can in the Bertie.
 
2012-09-27 12:38:49 PM

Triumph: FTFA: "some words which Brits regard as typically American - including "candy", "the fall", and "diaper""

Brits don't say "the fall" because they cut down 90% of their trees. The country gets by with a couple hundred rakes.


but they do "fall pregnant" in the UK....
 
2012-09-27 12:40:22 PM

hubiestubert: Jay could place folks within 50 miles of where they were born, or at least lived during their childhood. An amazing ear for accent and dialect, he made it a regular exercise to speak to folks and infer where they'd come from within minutes, by their choice of words, their accent, and he was startlingly precise.


Thanks to having some training in linguistics, and having a Welsh father who travelled a great deal and was able to mimic regional accents, I have this skill to some degree. My particular variation is not only to figure out where you were born, but how long you've been "away" by the example of how much drift was audible in the accent.

I guessed recently that a 70 year old doctor who otherwise sounded very RP (BBC English, or "educated Londoner", more or less for the non-linguists), and who had spent 25 years as a doctor in Africa, was originally from Devon and had spent approximately 35 years or half his life based in Toronto.

The astonished answer was "Devon" and "36 years".

The hardest one ever was guessing that a fellow who had moved to South Africa in his late teens until 30, and then Canada, was actually from Tasmania, mainly because I've encountered perhaps five Tasmanians in my life. He sounded like a cat being sick on Steve Irwin. Yis.

It's a party trick, but a good one that earns me free pints. I credit being raised on Britcoms and nature documentaries for my good ear, although I can pull off separating a Chilean from an Argentinian if both are speaking English, can distinguish the six or so major Irish accents, and nailing most American regional dialects is pretty easy, unless it's something really out there like Gullah. I can't vocally replicate all the dialects myself, however: the dialect words trip me up, or "oop", or "ehp".
 
2012-09-27 12:42:04 PM

trappedspirit: hubiestubert: I was lucky enough to have two great professors at UMF.

Why did they not teach you how to break a wall of text up into paragraphs?


I guess they inculcated a love of not breaking up a paragraph into nonsensical breaks, as opposed to a goldfish length attention span...
 
2012-09-27 12:48:26 PM

The Envoy: Zizzowop: I also blame this, the Death Star canteen:

Link

Genius.

"I'm your boss."
"You're Mr. Stevens?"



Are you Jeff Vader?

Inevitably recalls this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEET4g9DiNk
 
2012-09-27 01:03:26 PM
TIs ok, Brits are looking more like Americans every day.
 
2012-09-27 01:10:05 PM

Valiente: trappedspirit: fickenchucker: Top Gear, Dr. Who, and FARK links to Daily Mail.

Just yesterday I was trying to describe my friend's ex-wife to someone, and the only thing I could think of was "chav".

We need a word like that over here.

Does 'skank' not work for ya?

No. You can have chavs in both sexes, and chavs, while potentially indiscrimately promiscuous, are more about being stupid, violent and cheaply fashion-conscious while unashamedly sucking at the tit of the welfare state.

I've never heard "skank" applied to a male, although it's hard to determine why not. "Manho", maybe? "Slot"?




Well said. "Chav" sums up everything in one little word, of which we no equivalent.
 
2012-09-27 01:13:19 PM

hubiestubert: trappedspirit: hubiestubert: I was lucky enough to have two great professors at UMF.

Why did they not teach you how to break a wall of text up into paragraphs?

I guess they inculcated a love of not breaking up a paragraph into nonsensical breaks, as opposed to a goldfish length attention span...


First you attack my eyes with a "wall of text" ™ then you insinuate I have a short attention span? It was not love they inculcated in you. Not love.
 
2012-09-27 01:27:59 PM
Has anyone ever been culcated?

Possibly leading to gruntlement?
 
2012-09-27 01:39:04 PM

I sound fat: It might be CALLED english, but its our language, we will take what we want, and you will like it.


From a previous Fark thread I enjoyed this statement:

"Dear English people. There are more of us than there are of you, therefore we now define modern english language.

PS: Don't tell the Indians about this"
 
2012-09-27 01:49:53 PM
"Now Rory knows that claret is imminent , but doesn't want to miss any of his game. So, calm as a coma, he picks up the fire extinguisher, walks right past the jam rolls who are ready for action, and plonks it outside the front door. He then goes back and orders an Aristotle of the most ping pong tiddly in the nuclear sub, and switches back to his footer. "That's farking it!" says the geezer. "That's farking what?" says Rory. He then gobs out a mouthful of booze, covering fatty. He then flicks a flaming match into his bird's nest, and the bastard's lit up like a leaking gas pipe. Unfazed, Rory turns back to his game. His team's won too. Four-nil."
 
2012-09-27 01:55:31 PM

Camus' Ghost: "Now Rory knows that claret is imminent , but doesn't want to miss any of his game. So, calm as a coma, he picks up the fire extinguisher, walks right past the jam rolls who are ready for action, and plonks it outside the front door. He then goes back and orders an Aristotle of the most ping pong tiddly in the nuclear sub, and switches back to his footer. "That's farking it!" says the geezer. "That's farking what?" says Rory. He then gobs out a mouthful of booze, covering fatty. He then flicks a flaming match into his bird's nest, and the bastard's lit up like a leaking gas pipe. Unfazed, Rory turns back to his game. His team's won too. Four-nil."


....the Aristocrats?
 
2012-09-27 01:56:38 PM

FirstNationalBastard: I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.


The British version of The Office is not a comedy.

It is a dramatic mockumentary with the odd funny moment. Overall it is extremely dark and depressing. They are horrid people living meaningless, horrible lives.

Basically the US Office makes me wish I worked at a paper company.

The UK Office has convinced me that suicide is the only answe if I ever work at a paper company.

That doesn't mean either version is without merit, but for as much material as they share, they are in no way even similar shows.
 
2012-09-27 02:00:50 PM
Ok really nobody brought these up?

Jeeves and wooster, Pocoyo (voiced by Stephen Fry), Downton Abbey, Little Big Planet, basically anything Steven Fry or Hugh Laurie has done.

// currently working with a Brit, we have good chats.
 
2012-09-27 02:33:18 PM
Whatever---- American living in Europe.... no one understands half the American slang I use. If I say I have to run, they think I am going jogging.

Actually 'spot on' sounds ridiculous with an American accent, due to how the 't' is pronounced.

Speaking of "Americanisms" I have been away long enough that I find the American way of overstating everything to be hilarious. Everything is spoken using extreme descriptors--- 'the meal was excellent' etc.... 'everything was great'.... 'it was the best ever'..... 'it is wonderful to see you again....' "I loved the cheese" "I hated the movie" "it was the worst ever...." "I was very disappointed that....."
 
2012-09-27 02:39:52 PM

I can't get the cap off!: The British version of The Office is not a comedy.

It is a dramatic mockumentary with the odd funny moment. Overall it is extremely dark and depressing. They are horrid people living meaningless, horrible lives.


It's just a dark comedy... It's definitely comedy, just of the very uncomfortable sort that you don't know whether to cringe at or laugh at... (I usually do both...) Somehow, it just never feels wrong laughing at Michael Scott, and no matter how outrageous the shiat he pulls is, it never feels cringeworthy; but, David Brent on the other hand just makes you feel genuinely embarrased for the poor bastard, while still wanting to laugh at him... The same with Dwight vs. Gareth... I think it's just that the Brits are better at playing their humor straight and dry...
 
2012-09-27 02:57:26 PM

Hermione_Granger: Actually, I think is the solution to a problem as Americans don't mind speaking like Brits and generally think it's fun, whereas Brits go positively apeshiat over supposed "Americanisms".

Brits: Overreacting to shiat since 1773.


Meh, my boss is like that, but it isn't all that common - plenty of Americanisms come across all the time, most people don't care. To take a non-linguistic example, over 1.5 million pumpkins were sold for Halloween last year in the UK, growing 10%+ each year, from almost none a decade or two ago.
 
2012-09-27 03:00:31 PM

xria: Hermione_Granger: Actually, I think is the solution to a problem as Americans don't mind speaking like Brits and generally think it's fun, whereas Brits go positively apeshiat over supposed "Americanisms".

Brits: Overreacting to shiat since 1773.

Meh, my boss is like that, but it isn't all that common - plenty of Americanisms come across all the time, most people don't care. To take a non-linguistic example, over 1.5 million pumpkins were sold for Halloween last year in the UK, growing 10%+ each year, from almost none a decade or two ago.


To be fair, they were sort of offended by Americans differentiating our English since the days of Noah Webster...
 
2012-09-27 03:08:01 PM

RobSeace:
The same with Dwight vs. Gareth... I think it's just that the Brits are better at playing their humor straight and dry...


I think it is because Dwight is actually supposed to be a good person who is misunderstood.

Gareth on the other hand comes off as an actual bigot. When he says that a gay man shouldn't be allowed around animals, it isn't a joke. He actually believes that.
 
2012-09-27 03:32:59 PM

I can't get the cap off!: RobSeace:
The same with Dwight vs. Gareth... I think it's just that the Brits are better at playing their humor straight and dry...

I think it is because Dwight is actually supposed to be a good person who is misunderstood.

Gareth on the other hand comes off as an actual bigot. When he says that a gay man shouldn't be allowed around animals, it isn't a joke. He actually believes that.


and that's why it's funny.

Something I do notice is that folks aren't afraid to portray horrid people, with no redeeming qualities in comedies. I think sometimes, that actually seeing people espouse such nastiness, in an unrepentant way, can be good. Perhaps those on the borderline of shiathead who are watching, may just tip the other way.
 
2012-09-27 04:00:17 PM

FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.


QI, Top Gear they both are educational with loads of humor.
 
2012-09-27 04:09:20 PM
What a pain in the arse.
 
2012-09-27 04:52:55 PM

xria: canisms come across all the time, most people don't care. To take a non-linguistic example, over 1.5 million pumpkins were sold for Halloween last year in the UK, growing 10%+ each year, from almost none a decade or two ago.


You realize that represents a revival of Hallowe'en, right?

It's not an American holiday. Presidents' Day is an American holiday.
 
2012-09-27 05:00:07 PM

JeffDenver: The two that annoy me the most are pluralizing "math" and using words like "hospital" by themselves. It makes me want to bomb them.

It is not "hospital", it is "THE hospital". Do they also go to Store as well?


No, they go to Tesco.
 
2012-09-27 05:20:39 PM

FirstNationalBastard:

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.




I for one never get tired of American men putting on a funny voice to do a Monty Python routine.
If you can't laugh at that, you have no soul.
 
2012-09-27 05:43:56 PM

LDM90: BBC presenters(!) are weird. They keep telling me the President's name is Bear Rack Obammar. I don't know who that is.


'es the wog in the white 'ouse's oo e is.

/sorry.
 
2012-09-27 05:51:49 PM

I can't get the cap off!: The British version of The Office is not a comedy.


Enormous, gigantic, unmitigated, unparalelled, stupendous FAIL.
 
2012-09-27 05:54:47 PM
Well I understand most dialects of UK English and even Canuk English better than I can understand the northeastern US dialects, especially the Masshole dialect.
 
2012-09-27 06:18:43 PM
Some words, often the more formal ones, were once common on both sides of the Atlantic, but dropped out of American English usage while remaining popular in Britain, says Yagoda - amongst (instead of among), trousers (instead of pants), and fortnight (two weeks) are examples.

Yagoda has obviously never been to hillbilly country here in America. "Amongst", "trousers", and "fortnight" never dropped out of style.
 
2012-09-27 06:30:57 PM
Jeeves & Wooster time!
 
2012-09-27 07:04:23 PM

Rufus Lee King: All this is a new experiment in sharing cultures.

[25.media.tumblr.com image 448x339]


THANK YOU!
 
2012-09-27 07:05:29 PM

xcv: Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


I will kill the living shiat out of you.
 
2012-09-27 07:06:34 PM

Rufus Lee King: The prob em is, we're Just not "hip" around here.

[content8.flixster.com image 359x270]


The voice of youth! Did you see that??? They're still wearing flared trousers!


/there's always room for the Young Ones.
 
2012-09-27 07:42:53 PM
I for one blame it on watching to much British Top Gear.

/wankers

www.hypermiler.co.uk
 
2012-09-27 07:47:23 PM

JeffDenver: The two that annoy me the most are pluralizing "math" and using words like "hospital" by themselves. It makes me want to bomb them.

It is not "hospital", it is "THE hospital". Do they also go to Store as well?


Some of them even go to university.
 
2012-09-27 07:59:43 PM
I've noticed Steven King uses a lot of Britishisms in his more recent novels.
 
2012-09-27 08:01:21 PM

cman: alienated: FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers

RED DWARF AND THE IT CROWD farkING RULES

British comedy is awesome. I would like to praise our English brethren for being some very funny farkers across the pond.


You should watch Coupling. It's like an adults only version of Friends and one of the funniest sitcoms I've ever seen.
 
2012-09-27 08:13:07 PM
Resistance is futile.
 
2012-09-27 08:14:15 PM

kg2095: cman: alienated: FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers

RED DWARF AND THE IT CROWD farkING RULES

British comedy is awesome. I would like to praise our English brethren for being some very funny farkers across the pond.

You should watch Coupling. It's like an adults only version of Friends and one of the funniest sitcoms I've ever seen.


Three words: Lesbian. Spank. Inferno.
 
2012-09-27 09:14:24 PM

The Envoy: I can't get the cap off!: The British version of The Office is not a comedy.

Enormous, gigantic, unmitigated, unparalelled, stupendous FAIL.


Do tell.

The show is an examination of the futility of human existence. That doesn't exactly scream comedy, even if there were humorous moments.

I spent the entire second series waiting for David Brent's suicide, and given the tone of the show, the shoehorned-in happy ending given to us by the Christmas Special actually seems more likely to be the delusional product of his hypoxic brain as he is hanging from the ceiling of his old office.

That show was farking dark.
 
2012-09-27 09:47:51 PM

Ambivalence: Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.


Red Dwarf.
 
2012-09-27 10:03:30 PM

brigid_fitch: Like people actually IN or even from the Manhattan area. I'm from Jersey City and, although I've (thankfully) lost 99% of that accent, I don't pronounce the t's in Manhattan or the 1st t in important. Nobody in my area does. You don't start to hear it until you get down by the Philly area.


Manhattan is a Native American word, probably from one of the Algonquin languages. Do the Brits think they own the proper pronunciation of Cuyahoga, Seattle, or Wampanoag?

Jersey is of course pronounced "Joisey". The one in England with the same spelling is pronounced differently.
 
2012-09-27 10:58:49 PM
Flamin' Nora!
 
2012-09-28 12:58:42 AM

LincolnLogolas: We got Aussieisms creeping into conversation at my office. You can hear Americans saying "no worries, mate" throughout the day.


You can turn it up a notch with "no wuckin' furries" (that last word being pronounced to rhyme with 'worries') and then move into "no wuckers"
 
2012-09-28 10:15:38 AM

I can't get the cap off!: Do tell.

The show is an examination of the futility of human existence. That doesn't exactly scream comedy, even if there were humorous moments.

I spent the entire second series waiting for David Brent's suicide, and given the tone of the show, the shoehorned-in happy ending given to us by the Christmas Special actually seems more likely to be the delusional product of his hypoxic brain as he is hanging from the ceiling of his old office.

That show was farking dark.


I'm sure you can explain how its being dark precludes it from being funny. It is black comedy and is acknowledged as being very, very funny.

At the British Comedy Awards in 2001, The Office won the Best New TV Comedy award. In 2002, the series won the Best TV Comedy award, and Gervais the Best TV Comedy Actor award.

In 2004, The Office won the Golden Globe Award for "Best Television Series: Musical Or Comedy", beating nominees Arrested Development, Monk, Sex and the City and Will & Grace. It was the only British comedy in 25 years to be nominated for a Golden Globe, and the first ever to win one. Ricky Gervais was also awarded the Golden Globe for "Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series: Musical or Comedy" for his role.

Also in 2004, the BBC's Britain's Best Sitcom public poll voted the programme the 25th all-time favourite out of a preselected list of 100.
 
2012-09-28 11:35:20 AM

cloud_van_dame: Ambivalence: Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Red Dwarf.


Talking of Red Dwarf, Series 10 is about to hit UK TV screens. It will either be awsome-sauce or total fail.
 
2012-09-28 12:10:42 PM

Pinko_Commie: cloud_van_dame: Ambivalence: Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Red Dwarf.

Talking of Red Dwarf, Series 10 is about to hit UK TV screens. It will either be awsome-sauce or total fail.


Sadly, judging by the last attempt, I think it will be the latter. Like all old relationships, you can't go back.
 
2012-09-28 12:32:36 PM

The Envoy:
I'm sure you can explain how its being dark precludes it from being funny.


It doesn't. However, it depends upon what the show is centered.

The UK Office is a drama with comedic moments. You could take the comedic moments out of the show, and it would still work. It may not be as good, but it would stand alone as an excellent mockumentary on the depressing futility of human existence.

The US Office is a comedy with dramatic moments. It is the exact opposite of the UK version. You could take the dramatic moments out of the show and it would still work as a comedy, albeit a bit slapsticky.

For whatever reason, the media has an obsession of labeling any show that cracks a single joke as a comedy. That doesn't make it correct.
 
2012-09-28 03:04:13 PM

I can't get the cap off!: The UK Office is a drama with comedic moments. You could take the comedic moments out of the show, and it would still work.


That's like saying you could take all the comedy out of "M*A*S*H", and it would still work as a great drama series... Maybe, but it wouldn't be the same show... It's so great precisely because it combines the two genres via skillful use of black comedy...

Plus, I'm not sure you're fully seeing all of the "comedic moments"... I suspect some of what you consider unfunny drama, a lot of us are laughing at... Because, honestly, if you cut out all the funny parts, I think you'd be left with maybe 5 minutes of runtime per episode, if that...
 
2012-09-28 04:33:46 PM
Wow. I just realised that a huge amoung of the coastal Southern New England English I grew up with is apparently 'British'. To be fair, I've long respected what I've termed 'North Atlantic English,' and I use some version of it most of the time myself. But I had no idea that so many common terms and expressions that I honestly believed were conventional American speech apparently are not.

One thing I started thinking about several years ago is that English hasn't been, well, English for many years -- really, not since the end of the 18th Century, when English-speaking expatriates started to exist in huge numbers and in their own countries. By this point, English is a truly global language, and no one owns it. And yet, and yet: What exists of the standardisation of English in international use (or at least the pretense thereof) IS predominantly, if not British, at least Commonwealth. And in that international community of large, wealthy, influential traders constantly yammering across oceans, only one of them follows the discrete habits of American English -- our dearth of 'ou,' our preference for 'z' over 's' in terminal syllables, and some other traits. As powerful as America is, we are nevertheless vastly outnumbered in the much more equanimious space of the Internet, where more and more of what happens of consequence in the world -- especially communication -- takes place.

In short, some form of International English almost has to win out, no matter how Americans may feel about it, and that form almost can't help but have a strong Commonwealth cast to it, as formal International English does now. Since people learn their language from daily conversation, and so much of that happens online now, it's probably inevitable that distinctly American English will slowly fade, along with other distinct dialects, over the course of this century, and we'll likely end it with a more uniform international tongue, probably looking and sounding more Commonwealth than American, though also coloured (yes, coloUred) with many other languages -- perhaps, as Jos Wheadon predicts, including Mandarin.
 
2012-09-28 04:50:02 PM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: I was just thinking about this the other day as I was lobbing Bob the Knob across the gob.


Battle of Epping Forest Sweet!
 
2012-09-28 05:03:34 PM

JeffDenver: The two that annoy me the most are pluralizing "math" and using words like "hospital" by themselves. It makes me want to bomb them.

It is not "hospital", it is "THE hospital". Do they also go to Store as well?


Yes, This is Dog.

I am Police Chief.
 
2012-09-28 05:19:01 PM

SquiggsIN: The average American doesn't have all that good of a grasp on the English language anyway.

I blame hip/hop, texting, and MTV (not in that order).


And who was to blame before all that came along?

It's been parents all along, trust me.
 
2012-09-28 05:20:40 PM

thisispete: Enjoying the work of Stephen Fry is one of my personal litmus tests for whether I will probably like someone.


O yes, yes. Well, more like, if someone *doesn't* like Fry, then I probably won't enjoy their company.
 
2012-09-28 05:24:02 PM

xcv: Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


I would piss myself laughing for about two minutes of that. Then look for who to kill.
 
2012-09-28 05:30:44 PM

fredbox: Any bird fancy a shag?

I'm also noticing American media omitting the definite article more often, such as "Fredbox is in hospital after asking if any bird fancies a shag"


We do that here, too, in New England. (Not everyone, but it's common.) We also commonly "go to university."
 
2012-09-28 05:31:33 PM

Camus' Ghost: "Now Rory knows that claret is imminent , but doesn't want to miss any of his game. So, calm as a coma, he picks up the fire extinguisher, walks right past the jam rolls who are ready for action, and plonks it outside the front door. He then goes back and orders an Aristotle of the most ping pong tiddly in the nuclear sub, and switches back to his footer. "That's farking it!" says the geezer. "That's farking what?" says Rory. He then gobs out a mouthful of booze, covering fatty. He then flicks a flaming match into his bird's nest, and the bastard's lit up like a leaking gas pipe. Unfazed, Rory turns back to his game. His team's won too. Four-nil."


Amusing, but I'm not sure that colloquialisms are the same thing as referring to a like object using completely different words truck/lorry elevator/lift diapers/nappies. Most of those phrases aren't used universally across the entire UK are they?

Just curious. Also what is the origin of lorry? I can understand a lot of them, but I've never heard where that one comes from.

If anyone could answer I would appreciate it.

=]
 
2012-09-28 05:40:44 PM

filter: Whatever---- American living in Europe.... no one understands half the American slang I use. If I say I have to run, they think I am going jogging.

Actually 'spot on' sounds ridiculous with an American accent, due to how the 't' is pronounced.

Speaking of "Americanisms" I have been away long enough that I find the American way of overstating everything to be hilarious. Everything is spoken using extreme descriptors--- 'the meal was excellent' etc.... 'everything was great'.... 'it was the best ever'..... 'it is wonderful to see you again....' "I loved the cheese" "I hated the movie" "it was the worst ever...." "I was very disappointed that....."


Eddie Izzard has a great bit about the overuse of the word awesome- it should mean something miraculous, rare, and wonderful that could literally bring you to your knees in amazement, and Americans use it to describe chili dogs and Nickelback songs :P

(obviously not everyone)
 
2012-09-28 05:50:46 PM

xria: Hermione_Granger: Actually, I think is the solution to a problem as Americans don't mind speaking like Brits and generally think it's fun, whereas Brits go positively apeshiat over supposed "Americanisms".

Brits: Overreacting to shiat since 1773.

Meh, my boss is like that, but it isn't all that common - plenty of Americanisms come across all the time, most people don't care. To take a non-linguistic example, over 1.5 million pumpkins were sold for Halloween last year in the UK, growing 10%+ each year, from almost none a decade or two ago.


The American version of Halloween seems to be catching on in Europe the last few years.

It's fun as hell, the kids are adorable and for them it's the most crazy, sugar charged holiday of the year.

It's a good excuse to don the French Maid outfit and get pissed with your friends.

What's not to love?

=]
 
2012-09-28 06:21:42 PM

Soulcatcher: Eddie Izzard has a great bit about the overuse of the word awesome- it should mean something miraculous, rare, and wonderful that could literally bring you to your knees in amazement, and Americans use it to describe chili dogs and Nickelback songs :P


I love that bit:

And the universe is unbelievable. I mean our galaxy, the Milky Way, a hundred billion stars - a hundred billion stars! We wouldn't count up to a hundred billion. We could count up to a hundred billion, but we would not. They have clusters of galaxies, and then there's big, big bits of nothing, so it's awesome, yeah?. The universe is awesome using the original version, the meaning of the word awesome, yeah? Not the new one which is sort of for socks and hot dogs: "Hey! Red and yellow - awesome! You got red and yellow socks, they're awesome!" You know. But if they were you'd be (gasps). I saw an advert for 'awesome hot dogs, only $2.99'. If they were awesome you'd be going, (gasping for breath) "I can not breathe for the way the sausage is held by the bun. It is it is speaking to me. It is saying 'we are lips and thighs of a donkey. Please eat us but do not think that we are lips when you eat us, otherwise you'll throw up'." Which is true! It's awesome!

America needs the old version of awesome, because you're the only ones going into space. You've got a bit of cash and you go up there, and you need 'awesome' because you're going to be going to the next sun to us. And your President's going to be going (American voice) "Can you tell me, astronaut, can you tell me what it's like?" "It's awesome, sir." "What, like a hot dog?" "Like a hundred billion hot dogs, sir. Sir, it's the dog's bollocks, that's what it is!"


/Link to video
 
2012-09-28 10:27:15 PM

Soulcatcher: JeffDenver: The two that annoy me the most are pluralizing "math" and using words like "hospital" by themselves. It makes me want to bomb them.

It is not "hospital", it is "THE hospital". Do they also go to Store as well?

Yes, This is Dog.

I am Police Chief.


This made me laugh.
 
2012-09-28 10:39:01 PM

Jgok: I constantly have to go back to get rid of extra u's, check for the s/z switches (recognised, etc), et al.


No, you don't. :)

I use some (constantly changing) version of the 'Atlantic English' I mentioned above (basically, most New England English with mostly British spelling, but more similar to Canadian overall), and I've worked successfully as an editor of American English. The variant spellings don't bother me, and I can keep them straight when I have to.
 
2012-09-28 10:41:26 PM

EyeballKid: Does this mean Niall Ferguson, Piers Morgan, Tina Brown, Simon Cowell, and Gordon Ramsay will be out of work, as Americans lose their fascination with the Brit-speak and realize these twats are just frothing out utter rubbish?


Not likely, I think, as our gibbering twats aren't any better, but British people just 'sound' smarter to most Americans. Which kind of tells you how smart most Americans are, don'it?
 
2012-09-28 10:46:08 PM

Ikam: FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.


Connecticut-raised here. (Not -born, but I wasn't even five when we moved here, so as far as I'm concerned, this is where I'm from.) Lot of that here, among us natives. New Britain: "New Bri'ain," that sort of thing. And I've always known Manhattan as "Manhat'n," and so far as I can tell most natives there do also. None of this is even slightly new, at least not on the order of my lifetime.
 
2012-09-29 01:12:18 AM

Doctor Jan Itor: shiat = bad
the shiat = good
the dog's shiat = ... ok it breaks down here and I can't be arsed to find a better one


Same here, more or less. (PNSFW - bad werdz)
 
2012-09-29 02:45:43 AM

Jesus Burnt My Hotdog: Rufus Lee King: What bothers me is that I'm sixteen, right? Old enough to have...intercourse...with the partner of my choice, yet I still can't go drinkn' in pubs...

And if you filmed yourself doing it you'd have to wait another two years before you could watch it.


Those laws are indeed bizarre, and I think pretty obviously moulded on various people's notions of what's 'moral' or 'appropriate' in some other more or less arbitrary way. I've found it especially hard to defend that someone old enough to fight and die for their country can't legally drink in it.*

Some years ago, friends and I did a little thought experiment, wherein we each made up our own country and described it. In mine, all rights of majority came not at any predetermined age, but instead on a case-by-case basis through a process I called 'warrant'. In this process, all youth were legal minors by default, and remained so until they achieved warrant. The actual warrant of majority was a legal instrument, gained by the minor winning the support (warranty) of at least three legal adult citizens, none of whom needed to be the minor's own parents or other adult relatives. I thought this neatly solved a bunch of problems, from age of majority to minor emancipation, without pegging them to any arbitrary ages. The logic is that everyone ages and mateurs differently, at different rates, and so instead of the calendar deciding when you could do certain things, (presumably) responsible adults in your community would. O, and *all* rights of majority come with it, all at once. None of this teatotalling soldier nonsense.

Separately, I don't feel it's valid that a person who knowingly and willingly creates images or recordings of themselves in a manner that it would be illegal for others to is actionable themselves for it, since I think it's difficult to press the concept of 'victimisation' or 'exploitation' in such cases. Someone who takes phone snaps of their own naughty bits and shares them has done something they shouldn't, for a bunch of reasons, but I can't see how it could be called criminal. I can understand the perspective of law enforcement that it could be done under duress or coercion, and that could be a cover for legitimately illegal actions, but I feel there should be a way to avoid charging witless minors with sex crimes.
 
2012-09-29 03:00:47 AM

Jack Kerouac: brigid_fitch: Ikam: FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.

Like people actually IN or even from the Manhattan area. I'm from Jersey City and, although I've (thankfully) lost 99% of that accent, I don't pronounce the t's in Manhattan or the 1st t in important. Nobody in my area does. You don't start to hear it until you get down by the Philly area.

I'm from Connecticut and I don't know anyone from this part of the state who pronounces the t's in 'Manhattan', though most people seem to pronounce 'important' with a very soft t at the end. Parts of CT lean towards what I call the Massachusetts pronunciation, while others are very influenced by NYC.


New Haven here, and I definitely have the New York / Corridor blend, like most people here do. Glottal stops in place of T's, vaguely watered-down British diction, a mixture of American and Commonwealth, the whole shebang. I notice that heading north through the Corridor, once you get past New Britain ("New Bri'ain"), there are a few subtle but noticeable changes. One of the more noticeable in the Hartford area is "aigs" (eggs), and along the Mass. border you start to hear the Eastern Mass. non-rhotic thing ("cah," etc., but *much* softer than the hard Boston sound); I also hear that east of Bolton Notch (Connecticut's Appalachia). Back in New Haven, from The Green on down, it's the East-of-Manhattan sound, as heard across lower Westchester and Fairfield Counties, and this extends as far east as Clinton, I think. But it drops off fast as you head inland: It's completely absent everywhere I've been in Beacon Valley, for example. (It's a pretty close correlation to the main Metro North line, no surprise.) And Waterbury is its own 20th Century museum of culture and dialect.
 
2012-09-29 03:04:01 AM

hubiestubert: Valiente: hubiestubert: Valiente: When British linguists want to take a better guess at how the Great Vowel Shift played out, they go to little barrier islands off the Mid-Atlantic states, or climb into the Appalachian hills. Suddenly, recitations of Shakespeare rhyme better.

Shakespeare wot loike he wuz spoke: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s

It's fascinating to hear and the case that "this is London English 400 years ago" is trechantly argued.

That was a great piece.

I had a feeling you'd enjoy it, and I didn't even have to write my post in IPA.

I had an English teacher in high school who was either the son of Danish immigrants to Canada or came here as a kid (maybe a WWII refugee thing). Because he spoke Danish, he had a leg up on Anglo-Saxon, and eventually mastered Middle English.

So we had recitations of Chaucer "as he was spake". Great stuff, if hard, at first, to follow. That naturally introduced Caxton's spelling innovations, the Great Vowel Shift and the concept of wandering rhotacisms and how the American accent of the northern Atlantic states is still similar to parts of East Anglia today. My favourite Fuddite is Lucy Worsley, a jolly hockey sticks sort of historian on the BBC with the least flattering haircut on Earth: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_Worsley

I was lucky to go to high school when there were still teachers unafraid to bring university-level subject matter to the classroom, and there was still enough money in the system to allow such intellectual roaming.

I was lucky enough to have two great professors at UMF. Karl Franson was a brilliant Shakespeare scholar, and while he was perhaps the most buttoned down Ivy League educated, prep school accented wee man clad in Kelly Green possible, he loved the language, not just of Shakespeare, but Bunyon as well. He taught these works as living pieces, still. Clad perhaps in armor of a language that had shifted beneath them, but reaching out from that past into today, with power an ...


What a beautiful reverie. Thank you so much!
 
2012-09-29 03:16:57 AM

I can't get the cap off!: FirstNationalBastard: I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

The British version of The Office is not a comedy.

It is a dramatic mockumentary with the odd funny moment. Overall it is extremely dark and depressing. They are horrid people living meaningless, horrible lives.

Basically the US Office makes me wish I worked at a paper company.

The UK Office has convinced me that suicide is the only answe if I ever work at a paper company.

That doesn't mean either version is without merit, but for as much material as they share, they are in no way even similar shows.


That's the way it is for *every* version. It's in many countries now, and they're *all* very different, both from each other and from the original. None of them are loyal to the original except in the most basic ways.
 
2012-09-29 03:39:08 AM

kg2095: cman: alienated: FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers

RED DWARF AND THE IT CROWD farkING RULES

British comedy is awesome. I would like to praise our English brethren for being some very funny farkers across the pond.

You should watch Coupling. It's like an adults only version of Friends and one of the funniest sitcoms I've ever seen.


I will watch anything with Gina Bellman in it.
 
2012-09-29 03:43:51 AM

I can't get the cap off!: The Envoy:
I'm sure you can explain how its being dark precludes it from being funny.

It doesn't. However, it depends upon what the show is centered.

The UK Office is a drama with comedic moments. You could take the comedic moments out of the show, and it would still work. It may not be as good, but it would stand alone as an excellent mockumentary on the depressing futility of human existence.

The US Office is a comedy with dramatic moments. It is the exact opposite of the UK version. You could take the dramatic moments out of the show and it would still work as a comedy, albeit a bit slapsticky.

For whatever reason, the media has an obsession of labeling any show that cracks a single joke as a comedy. That doesn't make it correct.


I'm beginning to think you don't really know what a "dark comedy" is.
 
2012-09-29 03:58:02 AM

Soulcatcher: Just curious. Also what is the origin of lorry? I can understand a lot of them, but I've never heard where that one comes from.

If anyone could answer I would appreciate it.


According to the few sources I checked, the origin is uncertain, but may be derived from the Northern English dialectical term 'lurry,' meaning to lug or haul. I can't help wondering, though, if it might be something else, or a blend of that and something else (as often happens). The reason I wonder is that the original usage was not for the modern motor-truck, but for a horse-drawn trolley, and specifically one with an unusually low bed, similar to the sort of thing used now to haul heavy vehicles -- very low bed, small wheels mounted alongside instead of underneath. The term then became applied to the motorised version of that, and then to motor trucks generally. What has me wondering about this is what seems to me the peculiar movement from 'u' to 'o' that would have to have occurred if it was derived strictly from 'lurry;' that seems an odd change by itself. But what if it was *also* (or instead) derived from something like "low-riding trolley"?
 
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