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(BBC)   Americans are sounding more like Brits every day. Bloody hell   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 278
    More: Cool, Americans, Chandra Levy, bloody hell, American English, Merriam-Webster, London Evening Standard, University of Delaware, British English  
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14265 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2012 at 5:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 08:16:20 AM
i can even remember a time when fark was an american site

pish posh
 
2012-09-27 08:17:25 AM
I blame Madonna.
 
2012-09-27 08:17:55 AM

Jon iz teh kewl: it's like the opposite of marmite. nobody loves or hates it. it's just there.


Wait. I thought you either loved or hated marmite. Am I getting my ad campaigns wrong?
 
2012-09-27 08:22:13 AM

EyeballKid: Jon iz teh kewl: it's like the opposite of marmite. nobody loves or hates it. it's just there.

Wait. I thought you either loved or hated marmite. Am I getting my ad campaigns wrong?


Oh, "opposite." Sorry, I guess I should start drinking my coffee, then.
 
2012-09-27 08:29:58 AM
FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.
 
2012-09-27 08:31:39 AM
Jesus christ.. I wish people would stop trying to halt the evolution of language. LANGUAGE CHANGES OVER TIME. get the fark over it and stop complaining about every new thing like some sort of farking troglodyte.
 
2012-09-27 08:33:41 AM

TheOriginalEd: Jesus christ.. I wish people would stop trying to halt the evolution of language. LANGUAGE CHANGES OVER TIME. get the fark over it and stop complaining about every new thing like some sort of farking troglodyte.


www.file-extensions.org
 
2012-09-27 08:34:12 AM
Quick crash course for you Septics...

bollocks = bad
the bollocks = good
the dog's bollocks = very good
 
2012-09-27 08:35:10 AM
Not me. I try to sound irish whenever I can.

/Ya dozy cow!
 
2012-09-27 08:37:31 AM
This thread is as thick as two short planks
 
2012-09-27 08:37:52 AM

Ikam: FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.


Funniest damn thing I ever heard accent wise was a guy from Bristol saying Chicago (shi-car-go)

/love the Bristol accent, really
 
2012-09-27 08:38:36 AM

fredbox: Any bird fancy a shag?

I'm also noticing American media omitting the definite article more often, such as "Fredbox is in hospital after asking if any bird fancies a shag"


Also, you write to someone and you may do this on a specified day.
Repeat after me : "I wrote to Ted on Monday", not "I wrote Ted Monday".

/math(ematic)s is plural, you flids.
 
2012-09-27 08:39:06 AM
I don't mind most of it, but it bothers me when brits put the accent on the wrong syllable.

Not going to start saying "pins" for legs.
 
2012-09-27 08:39:24 AM

Jesus Burnt My Hotdog: Quick crash course for you Septics...

bollocks = bad
the bollocks = good
the dog's bollocks = very good


shiat = bad
the shiat = good
the dog's shiat = ... ok it breaks down here and I can't be arsed to find a better one

Oi!
 
2012-09-27 08:39:55 AM
Dwanky clarts.
 
2012-09-27 08:40:48 AM

stellarossa: 30 years in the UK, 10 years in USA. I forget which spelling and phrases are which. Occasionally someone reminds me. Usually people get my drift.


Sometimes I find myself thinking: I can't remember if I say "shed-ule" or "sked-ule"...
 
2012-09-27 08:41:04 AM

Jgok: I have to admit... "Britishisms" have crept into my speech, probably from all the British shows over the years. Strangely enough, it's sneaking into my spelling as well. I constantly have to go back to get rid of extra u's, check for the s/z switches (recognised, etc), et al.


The removal of u's can purely be based on Noah Webster of course, and I guess I can see the point, but of course it doesn't help when the two cultures start merging again, but I guess he can't be blamed for not predicting the globalization of culture would come so far. The s/z switch strangely enough isn't actually an American/British thing, but actually a long running issue between Oxford and Cambridge Universities and their sphere's of influence (certain dictionaries, their book publishers, and beyond).

I have been on the internet way too long I guess because I can seamlessly switch between US and UK spelling mode. Doesn't work with the choice of words to match the culture as is being discussed in the linked article - just would be too much effort to try and track down which words you pick up are used in which cultures and try and remember that when you are writing. If you are on the internet then finding out what a word you don't understand means is only a click or two away at most, so it seems a trivial thing to pay much attention to (unless you are a sociologisit/linquist that can use the flow of words between cultures to make inferences about broader changes or whatever).
 
2012-09-27 08:46:06 AM

smadge1: As an Australian, I'm bombarded by both British and American culture all the time, so the distinctions here are lost on me.


Same. Apart from "snog" and "college", they just read like simple synonyms to me, neither British nor American.
 
2012-09-27 08:46:15 AM
I blame Billie Joe Armstrong.

Bloody poser.
 
2012-09-27 08:46:53 AM
WTF!? I've heard or been using most of those for my entire life and I'm 50.
 
2012-09-27 08:47:24 AM

Doctor Jan Itor:
shiat = bad
the shiat = good
the dog's shiat = ... ok it breaks down here and I can't be arsed to find a better one

Oi!


Why Americans think faeces is something to aspire to I have no idea. At least one can be proud of one's testicles.
 
2012-09-27 08:47:32 AM
I blame Clarkson and Top Gear...
 
2012-09-27 08:51:15 AM

Rufus Lee King: thisone: does this mean eventually I don't need to explain to visiting Americans the difference between 2 and fark you?

Well, I'e sort of used this earlier in the thread, but WTH?

[s2.postimage.org image 180x144]


Something exclusively British - the 2 finger salute. The British, OTOH, think it's universal. Completely oblivious, these guys sometimes. Originates in some battle against the French. The French used to chop off the only 2 useful fingers off of any captured English bowman; index and middle finger. Quite humane, really, for the day. Giving those two fingers (across the battlefield) meant: Neener neener neener, I've still got them.
 
2012-09-27 08:56:14 AM
www.igorwaver.com

rpnidev.files.wordpress.com


Oh no, even the meme's are turning decidedly British.
 
2012-09-27 08:58:03 AM
Pissed/ pissed off. Gets me all the time as often when an American says pissed meaning 'angry', 'drunk' fits as well.

"He was so pissed when he crashed his car."

"He was so pissed off when he crashed his car because he was pissed on Babycham."
 
2012-09-27 08:58:50 AM
Trousers? Go back and look at old American footage from the 30s-60s. People will say trousers (or slacks or dungarees, depending on the fabric) They won't say pants because that means underwear. Referring to trousers as pants is a newer phenomenon. The fashion went from kickers to longer trousers and they were called, in America, knickers and then trousers. It makes the rest of the article suspect.
 
2012-09-27 09:03:10 AM
Pants is a funny one. We use pants as an abbreviation for 'underpants', you use pants as an abbreviation of 'pantaloons'. Underpants must come from 'under-pantaloons' though.

Of course to call something pants over here means it's rubbish.
 
2012-09-27 09:11:41 AM
Sound like a bunch of cheeky gits to me.
 
2012-09-27 09:12:12 AM

xcv: Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


TCP/IP PUNCH!
 
2012-09-27 09:16:28 AM

Rufus Lee King: Cor, I'm farking my posts all up.


Sit daahn an' 'ave a cup o' tea guv'nor.
 
2012-09-27 09:25:49 AM

alienated: Oh, I forgot the inbetweeners- that is an odd duck of a show, but worth a check out, gov

Link


The Inbetweeners is good, but not as good (IMHO) as We Are Klang, and if you ever get the chance, watch Greg Davies stand up show, Throwing Cheeseballs at a Dog.
 
2012-09-27 09:28:20 AM

Wasilla Hillbilly: I've got blisters on me fingahs!!!


this was not lost on me. A++++
 
2012-09-27 09:28:43 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python


This. I've been watching British shows since the 70s when Channel 13 ran Monty Python & Channel 11 (or was it 9?) ran Benny Hill & Dave Allen. Later, I got hooked on Are You Being Served, Chef!, and AbFab. Now I watch as much BBC America as I do any other channel.

I'm sure a lot of the language transfer has to do with Harry Potter and even Gordon Ramsay. When you have that much British in your pop culture, it's bound to rub off. I've caught myself saying spot on, pear-shaped, brilliant, gobsmacked... I'm sure to most I probably come off as pretentious but I really can't help it--it's not intentional.
 
2012-09-27 09:29:11 AM
I think that with reference to advertising using "u" (colours, etc).. there's the factor that it's cheaper to make one advertisement that covers as much ground as possible, minimizing the adaptation to local areas makes sense when you look at it that way... The U is also present in Canada, which means you get an extra country by using it.

The U, in England and Canada, is perceived as correct usage (obviously), so if it's not there it gives a negative connotation to the statement used.

In America, two things happen.. One, folks suspect you're being a little snobbish by using it, or worldly, depending upon the level of hipster. Two, it sticks in your head a little as being unusual, which of course, is desirable in an advertisement. Not having the "U" means nothing "extra" to the Americans. Though if the President spelled color with a U, we might kinda start wondering about who's running the show.

Also, translation services around the world often have a tendency to cater to British English, rather than American English, as perhaps a perception that they are interchangeable, though the British English is perceived as "most correct" by outsiders for the same reason Spanish in Spain is considered the "most correct" version of Spanish to learn.
 
2012-09-27 09:34:05 AM

Ikam: FTFA "Yagoda notices changes in pronunciation too - for example his students sometimes use "that sort of London glottal stop", dropping the T in words like "important" or "Manhattan".

The glottal stop is not just confined to UK dialects, plenty of American dialects have it as well.


Like people actually IN or even from the Manhattan area. I'm from Jersey City and, although I've (thankfully) lost 99% of that accent, I don't pronounce the t's in Manhattan or the 1st t in important. Nobody in my area does. You don't start to hear it until you get down by the Philly area.
 
2012-09-27 09:39:28 AM
I was just thinking about this the other day as I was lobbing Bob the Knob across the gob.
 
OKO
2012-09-27 09:41:16 AM
Threads like this make me Rabid Dog so, so much.

Even a Pommie can be a good bugger, now and then.
 
2012-09-27 09:45:11 AM
It's ok limeys, you'll all be speaking arabic soon enough.
 
2012-09-27 09:48:46 AM

Dead-Guy: I think that with reference to advertising using "u" (colours, etc).. there's the factor that it's cheaper to make one advertisement that covers as much ground as possible, minimizing the adaptation to local areas makes sense when you look at it that way... The U is also present in Canada, which means you get an extra country by using it.

The U, in England and Canada, is perceived as correct usage (obviously), so if it's not there it gives a negative connotation to the statement used.

In America, two things happen.. One, folks suspect you're being a little snobbish by using it, or worldly, depending upon the level of hipster. Two, it sticks in your head a little as being unusual, which of course, is desirable in an advertisement. Not having the "U" means nothing "extra" to the Americans. Though if the President spelled color with a U, we might kinda start wondering about who's running the show.

Also, translation services around the world often have a tendency to cater to British English, rather than American English, as perhaps a perception that they are interchangeable, though the British English is perceived as "most correct" by outsiders for the same reason Spanish in Spain is considered the "most correct" version of Spanish to learn.


In a previous job I was told to use the American spelling for 'Localisation' (z in place of the s) as our American clients thought we, a localisation company, couldn't spell 'localization'.
 
2012-09-27 09:50:59 AM
I will never, ever say "jag-yu-ar."
 
2012-09-27 09:51:14 AM
Bollocks to this.


I say 'bloody hell' a lot. Doesn't mean I'm trying to be 'British'
 
2012-09-27 09:52:18 AM
I'll still keep my job translating Manchester English into Toronto Canadian for tourists from Texas.


I blame this guy.


i7.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-27 09:52:40 AM

hubiestubert: Oddly enough, Americans have preserved in some isolated communities, a more "true" British dialect than the current wash of BBC English and urban dialects.

Even as English has changed here, influenced by waves of immigration, changed in the Caribbean, changed in Australia, English was doing the same thing in England as well. Modern dialects are NOT the same as they were, and English is a language that is wonderfully adaptive, in its ability to absorb linguistic elements from languages it's near. The ability to absorb loan words, to still maintain structures, and in some ways, the "backwoods" dialects of America, have preserved many older elements of English.

Mass communication has done some interesting things with transmission of linguistic elements. Cultures aren't preserving changes for as long, and there is an odd bit of homogenization between cultures, including between sub-cultures across nations. It's a neat time to be a linguist. Even with the spread of film and even radio, there was a rise for a sort of "standard" dialect. BBC Standard, American Standard, and others, as a sort of "official" dialect, and entirely artificial, as opposed to the regionals, and the rise of folks aping the dialects that they heard on radio and in films, it sort of slowed linguistic drift, but now that we have a wider range of dialects spread quickly with mass communication, and less than official channels where just about anyone can upload videos, music and more, we get to see a lot more diversity, and oddly enough, folks aping one another.

Like I said, neat time to be a linguist.


When British linguists want to take a better guess at how the Great Vowel Shift played out, they go to little barrier islands off the Mid-Atlantic states, or climb into the Appalachian hills. Suddenly, recitations of Shakespeare rhyme better.

Shakespeare wot loike he wuz spoke: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s

It's fascinating to hear and the case that "this is London English 400 years ago" is trechantly argued.
 
2012-09-27 09:54:10 AM
Well, here's some "American English" for the article writer: Shut the fark up, biatch.

Ive been saying "will do" since I was 8...before I knew British people even existed.
 
2012-09-27 09:54:49 AM

jigoro: I will never, ever say "jag-yu-ar."


but will you say "ahh-DEE-dahs" or "nyk"

/I do like annoying people with the US pronunciation of Adidas
//and saying Nike is a US company, I think I know how to pronounce it tyvm :)
//I have no friends
 
2012-09-27 09:58:00 AM
Im just gonna go around saying 'Ni!" to old women.
 
2012-09-27 09:58:43 AM

xcv: Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


We need to remove this post IMMEDIATELY before Hollywood gets buzz and puts this into production. I will not let Shia LaBeouf rape the Doctor the way he raped Indiana Jones.

Crystal skull? More like crystal skull-farked. AMIRITE?
 
2012-09-27 09:58:47 AM
I find myself using British words far too often and it drives me crazy. I guess from my time living in New Zealand and now most of my expat friends are British. I even started spelling words incorrectly but corrected that nasty habit.
 
2012-09-27 09:59:45 AM
Whatever you do, don't go for the "banger in the mouth."

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-09-27 10:00:01 AM

xcv: Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.

Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


Masterful trolling, dude.
 
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