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(BBC)   Americans are sounding more like Brits every day. Bloody hell   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 277
    More: Cool, Americans, Chandra Levy, bloody hell, American English, Merriam-Webster, London Evening Standard, University of Delaware, British English  
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14271 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2012 at 5:39 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 06:34:26 AM  

hubiestubert: Oddly enough, Americans have preserved in some isolated communities, a more "true" British dialect than the current wash of BBC English and urban dialects.

Even as English has changed here, influenced by waves of immigration, changed in the Caribbean, changed in Australia, English was doing the same thing in England as well. Modern dialects are NOT the same as they were, and English is a language that is wonderfully adaptive, in its ability to absorb linguistic elements from languages it's near. The ability to absorb loan words, to still maintain structures, and in some ways, the "backwoods" dialects of America, have preserved many older elements of English.

Mass communication has done some interesting things with transmission of linguistic elements. Cultures aren't preserving changes for as long, and there is an odd bit of homogenization between cultures, including between sub-cultures across nations. It's a neat time to be a linguist. Even with the spread of film and even radio, there was a rise for a sort of "standard" dialect. BBC Standard, American Standard, and others, as a sort of "official" dialect, and entirely artificial, as opposed to the regionals, and the rise of folks aping the dialects that they heard on radio and in films, it sort of slowed linguistic drift, but now that we have a wider range of dialects spread quickly with mass communication, and less than official channels where just about anyone can upload videos, music and more, we get to see a lot more diversity, and oddly enough, folks aping one another.

Like I said, neat time to be a linguist.


You said aping twice, you cunning linguist you.
 
2012-09-27 06:38:20 AM  
I blame whatever has happened to me on working with Indians for the past 8 years. When you are around people who keep repeating the same phrases, it rubs off. Actual British people I have worked with were all in the Banking industry and I did not get along with them very well.
 
2012-09-27 06:38:41 AM  
Cheers!
 
2012-09-27 06:45:59 AM  
The one that annoys the hell out of me is the use of 'from' rather than 'starting' or 'as of':

From today, you can read this message online.
 
2012-09-27 06:46:58 AM  

Rufus Lee King: All this is a new experiment in sharing cultures.

[25.media.tumblr.com image 448x339]


I've got a Porsche!
 
2012-09-27 06:48:19 AM  

xcv: Why haven't we gotten a remake of Doctor Who yet? Could connect to a whole new audience with Shia LaBeouf as the Doctor, Rihanna as a spunky, sorta-goth chick as his new companion and the wise-cracking TARDIS embodied by a holographic Dane Cook. Bonus cameo by Jack Black as every single Dalek.


I want to hit you.
 
2012-09-27 06:49:07 AM  
Along with Top Gear and Monty Python, I also blame Eddie Izzard and Billy Connolly.
 
2012-09-27 06:51:50 AM  
This thread is bollocks.

That is all....
 
2012-09-27 06:52:50 AM  
Good.
 
2012-09-27 06:53:25 AM  
I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.
 
2012-09-27 06:55:43 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.


You monster.
 
2012-09-27 06:57:04 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.


One of us! One of us! One of us!
 
2012-09-27 06:58:30 AM  
I don't think there's any point in getting all mardy about it!
 
2012-09-27 07:01:57 AM  

quickdraw: I like the phrase "get sorted"


Top one Nice one Get sorted.
 
2012-09-27 07:03:21 AM  

Triumph: Brits don't say "the fall" because they cut down 90% of their trees.


If they hadn't, to build their navies, you would be calling it "automne" with a swishy French accent.
 
2012-09-27 07:04:06 AM  
American English is the bee's knees. Anyone who uses "Britishisms" can just bugger off. Farking silly twats.
 
2012-09-27 07:04:14 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.


And I always spell "gray" as "grey". It looks less gay.
 
2012-09-27 07:06:05 AM  
Mind you, American train stations still need some gaps to mind.
 
2012-09-27 07:08:56 AM  

Rufus Lee King: I'm sure this is already known, but a person was, in the days of merrie olde England, not supposed to use the adjective "bloody", as it invoked the blood of Christ, which was considered blasphemy.


I don't see why. He got better, didn't he?
 
2012-09-27 07:12:28 AM  

flamingboard: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

You monster.


Don't you mean "mounster"?
 
2012-09-27 07:12:34 AM  
At least it's just British. When Australian "English" begins to creep into this country I'm going to start shooting people.
 
2012-09-27 07:13:03 AM  

jmsvrsn: At least it's just British. When Australian "English" begins to creep into this country I'm going to start shooting people.


Good on you, mate.
 
2012-09-27 07:14:03 AM  
Unlike in the UK, there is no anti-ginger prejudice in the US

img.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-27 07:14:25 AM  

smadge1: As an Australian, I'm bombarded by both British and American culture all the time, so the distinctions here are lost on me.


Wheras I as an Englishman, am bombarded by so little Australian culture, sometimes I forget you even exist.
 
2012-09-27 07:15:16 AM  

Kazan: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

and interacting with british people online.

FirstNationalBastard: Ambivalence: I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!

Also, "buggery" is a much more fun and friendly sounding word than sodomy.

Sodomy sounds scary and painful. Buggery sounds like something fun you do with your buds after a night of drinking

agreed


Only if you're Greek or Turkish.
 
2012-09-27 07:22:45 AM  
does this mean eventually I don't need to explain to visiting Americans the difference between 2 and fark you?
 
2012-09-27 07:25:17 AM  
My boss from my last job was British. He and I had so much fun together when it came to cultural differences. The one we'd argue the most about was the gesture for "two", b/c I'd put up two fingers while I was talking reflexively, and of course, in Britain, it's a way of flipping someone off. He's always bring it up when I did it, and I'd always tell him "when in Rome". I hated that job, but he was the best boss I've ever had.
 
2012-09-27 07:26:41 AM  

jmsvrsn: At least it's just British. When Australian "English" begins to creep into this country I'm going to start shooting people.


No worries.
 
2012-09-27 07:27:20 AM  
Ambivalence: I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!

I love the resurgence of this word...when I was a kid in the 1970's, it rhymed with "cot" and sounded filthy and offensive, right up there with the "C-word." But once I heard Ricky Gervaise pronounce it as rhyming with "cat" it became harmless and fun.

Funny, that.
 
2012-09-27 07:27:58 AM  
The writer does understand we are using the same language so it should share some expressions, right?
 
2012-09-27 07:29:42 AM  
I just submitted a comment that was almost entirely swear words, and it didn't appear. Does Fark have some kind of "profanity overload trip" built in? (or "circuit breaker" as we would call it in the UK)
 
2012-09-27 07:31:37 AM  
Until recently, I thought "Gone pear shaped" was an American phrase. I was really surprised to find out it was a British-ism.

Also, this guy shows Mitt how it's done: You "plebs".
 
2012-09-27 07:33:20 AM  
30 years in the UK, 10 years in USA. I forget which spelling and phrases are which. Occasionally someone reminds me. Usually people get my drift.
 
2012-09-27 07:34:36 AM  

xria: alienated: FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers

I think Cheers was American originally. You also forgot Blackadder and Fawlty Towers.

Obviously English is going to merge a lot more - there are plenty of Americanisms coming the other way as well of course, and no doubt as India/China grow and assuming they carry on using English for business then sooner or later lots more words from there will transfer across (British English already has quite a number of words derived from links with India, but most are old enough transfers for most people not to know their origins).


Fawlty Towers gets a nod from the hotel & restaurant folks, but everyone else I've shown it to just didn't seem to get it.

Some of my other favorites have been Are You Being Served (and I liked Grace and Favour too, but I guess I'm weird), Red Dwarf, The IT Crowd, Blackadder, Vicar of Dibley, etc. I also find the British versions of Being Human and The Office much better than the American ones. Personally, I've never liked AbFab or Doctor Who, but to each his own.

Simon Pegg has done a bit on the film front as well. I know people who hate "British shows" but love Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz. Sure, they're a bit Americanised, but they've still got that British background & humor that just makes Americans go "WTF did he say?"

I have to admit... "Britishisms" have crept into my speech, probably from all the British shows over the years. Strangely enough, it's sneaking into my spelling as well. I constantly have to go back to get rid of extra u's, check for the s/z switches (recognised, etc), et al.
 
2012-09-27 07:36:52 AM  

Jgok: check for the s/z switches (recognised, etc), et al.


for fun, start saying "zed" instead of "zee"

Once that one's in there, it's hard to go back. I was correcting myself all over the place on my last visit to my parents.
 
2012-09-27 07:41:41 AM  
Are you suggesting coconuts migrate???
 
2012-09-27 07:43:58 AM  
Any bird fancy a shag?

I'm also noticing American media omitting the definite article more often, such as "Fredbox is in hospital after asking if any bird fancies a shag"
 
2012-09-27 07:47:12 AM  

enry: The one that annoys the hell out of me is the use of 'from' rather than 'starting' or 'as of':

From today, you can read this message online.


I detest the use of "off of" by Americans instead of 'off' or 'from'. The word 'from' seems to have disappeared from their vocabulary.
 
2012-09-27 07:52:54 AM  
Well, this is all a bit confusing, innit?
 
2012-09-27 07:55:17 AM  
Throw another shrimp on the barbie
 
2012-09-27 07:56:16 AM  

theoutlaw: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

One of us! One of us! One of us!


To be fair, I come by it honestly, as my mother is Irish.

0Icky0: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

And I always spell "gray" as "grey". It looks less gay.


www4.pictures.zimbio.com

Doesn't have a problem with that.
 
2012-09-27 07:58:38 AM  
First one to mention rogering?

\makes me giggle every time I see it.
 
2012-09-27 08:03:14 AM  
I can't read this article without hearing it in this guy's voice.

images4.wikia.nocookie.net
Now, neither can you.
 
2012-09-27 08:07:22 AM  

TV's Vinnie: I can't read this article without hearing it in this guy's voice.

[images4.wikia.nocookie.net image 427x464]
Now, neither can you.


I can. I have no idea what that guy's voice sounds like.
 
2012-09-27 08:08:26 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: theoutlaw: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

One of us! One of us! One of us!

To be fair, I come by it honestly, as my mother is Irish.0Icky0: DjangoStonereaver: I have been using the British extra 'u' in words like 'valour ', 'armour and 'colour' for years.

And I always spell "gray" as "grey". It looks less gay.

[www4.pictures.zimbio.com image 419x594]

Doesn't have a problem with that.


strange i always thought grey looked more ghey. in fact it's only 1 letter away from ghey.
 
2012-09-27 08:09:00 AM  
Does this mean Niall Ferguson, Piers Morgan, Tina Brown, Simon Cowell, and Gordon Ramsay will be out of work, as Americans lose their fascination with the Brit-speak and realize these twats are just frothing out utter rubbish?
 
2012-09-27 08:10:05 AM  
I blame my Canuck mother and grandparents, who typically rattled off "bloody", "arse", "knackered" and other sorts of phrases that made some of my friends scratch their heads in confusion. And Monty Python....

/"oh, 'ad enough, eh?"
 
2012-09-27 08:11:10 AM  
I've got blisters on me fingahs!!!
 
2012-09-27 08:15:34 AM  
it's like the opposite of marmite. nobody loves or hates it. it's just there.
 
2012-09-27 08:16:20 AM  
i can even remember a time when fark was an american site

pish posh
 
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