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(BBC)   Americans are sounding more like Brits every day. Bloody hell   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 278
    More: Cool, Americans, Chandra Levy, bloody hell, American English, Merriam-Webster, London Evening Standard, University of Delaware, British English  
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14264 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2012 at 5:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-27 12:13:59 AM
Just a bunch of wankers trying to sound cool.
 
2012-09-27 12:19:09 AM
Pull the other one, ya silly git
 
2012-09-27 12:22:06 AM
See what happens when people start watching British dramas?
 
2012-09-27 12:30:50 AM
We are one people, separated by a common language.
 
2012-09-27 12:35:18 AM
I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!
 
2012-09-27 12:42:44 AM

Ambivalence: I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!


Also, "buggery" is a much more fun and friendly sounding word than sodomy.

Sodomy sounds scary and painful. Buggery sounds like something fun you do with your buds after a night of drinking
 
2012-09-27 12:53:48 AM

FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?


and interacting with british people online.

FirstNationalBastard: Ambivalence: I have to admit. They have better swear words. Half the time you call someone a twat and they don't know to be offended by it. LOL!

Also, "buggery" is a much more fun and friendly sounding word than sodomy.

Sodomy sounds scary and painful. Buggery sounds like something fun you do with your buds after a night of drinking


agreed
 
2012-09-27 12:58:29 AM

FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?


I blame Monty Python
 
2012-09-27 01:00:35 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python


Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.
 
2012-09-27 01:00:55 AM
i253.photobucket.comBrits need to put olives on the tips of their fingers it feels good AND IT'S THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE OF FUN!
 
2012-09-27 01:03:51 AM
Oddly enough, Americans have preserved in some isolated communities, a more "true" British dialect than the current wash of BBC English and urban dialects.

Even as English has changed here, influenced by waves of immigration, changed in the Caribbean, changed in Australia, English was doing the same thing in England as well. Modern dialects are NOT the same as they were, and English is a language that is wonderfully adaptive, in its ability to absorb linguistic elements from languages it's near. The ability to absorb loan words, to still maintain structures, and in some ways, the "backwoods" dialects of America, have preserved many older elements of English.

Mass communication has done some interesting things with transmission of linguistic elements. Cultures aren't preserving changes for as long, and there is an odd bit of homogenization between cultures, including between sub-cultures across nations. It's a neat time to be a linguist. Even with the spread of film and even radio, there was a rise for a sort of "standard" dialect. BBC Standard, American Standard, and others, as a sort of "official" dialect, and entirely artificial, as opposed to the regionals, and the rise of folks aping the dialects that they heard on radio and in films, it sort of slowed linguistic drift, but now that we have a wider range of dialects spread quickly with mass communication, and less than official channels where just about anyone can upload videos, music and more, we get to see a lot more diversity, and oddly enough, folks aping one another.

Like I said, neat time to be a linguist.
 
2012-09-27 01:05:00 AM

FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

Are You Being Served?

and Keeping Up Appearances were both pretty popular

/personally I was a big fan of Waiting For God, too
 
2012-09-27 01:05:05 AM

FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.


It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.
 
2012-09-27 01:10:40 AM
I like the phrase "get sorted"
 
2012-09-27 01:12:58 AM

quickdraw: I like the phrase "get sorted"


"Bunk up" has some appeal, but then again, I ain't good people...
 
2012-09-27 01:29:27 AM
I blame Madonna.
 
2012-09-27 01:39:49 AM

FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?


Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers
 
2012-09-27 01:39:56 AM
Shall we continue to use the dreaded English tongue? I thought that the folk tongue was about as pop as a bog roll after a mint chock chip festival
 
2012-09-27 01:41:19 AM

Ambivalence: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: See what happens when people start watching British dramas?

I blame Monty Python

Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Sure, there's stuff like Python that's pretty much universal, but do other British comedies make it across as well? I mean, even The Office had to be Americanized.

/then dragged out for about 6 years too long, as is the American way.

It depends. Geeks like british comedy. Just look at IT Crowd, Doctor Who (it's funny), spacers.


You misspelled "Spaced".
 
2012-09-27 01:41:27 AM

alienated: FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers


RED DWARF AND THE IT CROWD farkING RULES

British comedy is awesome. I would like to praise our English brethren for being some very funny farkers across the pond.
 
2012-09-27 01:46:22 AM
Oh, I forgot the inbetweeners- that is an odd duck of a show, but worth a check out, gov

Link
 
2012-09-27 01:59:37 AM
FTFA: "some words which Brits regard as typically American - including "candy", "the fall", and "diaper""

Brits don't say "the fall" because they cut down 90% of their trees. The country gets by with a couple hundred rakes.
 
2012-09-27 02:07:55 AM

Triumph: FTFA: "some words which Brits regard as typically American - including "candy", "the fall", and "diaper""

Brits don't say "the fall" because they cut down 90% of their trees. The country gets by with a couple hundred rakes.


Fall (as in the season) came from British English. It was pretty much gone from British English by WWII. We in America kept it alive and it is making a comeback in our grandmother's tongue.
 
2012-09-27 02:22:43 AM
Brilliant.
 
2012-09-27 02:23:33 AM
I never thought of "will do" as a British phrase.
 
2012-09-27 02:36:38 AM
I blame Top Gear

/and 22 years of working at Renaissance Festivals.
 
2012-09-27 02:50:50 AM

Shadow Blasko: /and 22 years of working at Renaissance Festivals.


lulz
 
2012-09-27 02:52:32 AM

brap: [i253.photobucket.com image 375x282]Brits need to put olives on the tips of their fingers it feels good AND IT'S THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE OF FUN!


Did you find this while looking for something else in a GIS, or are you do you actually have a "young girls playing with olives" folder?

/still lol'd, though
 
2012-09-27 03:08:11 AM

alienated: Shadow Blasko: /and 22 years of working at Renaissance Festivals.

lulz


Tis true...


BTW, you get 10,000 points for your name on your bio.

/Named my car Talyn.
 
2012-09-27 04:24:46 AM
The use of ginger in the US to describe red hair took off with publication of the first Harry Potter book in 1998,

Pretty sure it was South Park that took the word mainstream.

Americans use "expiration date" for the British sell-by date - the date by which supermarket food must be sold.

They are two different things. One is when the food should no longer be consumed, the other is when it should no longer be sold. I've heard the useage of both since the 80's.

Now, if American's start using the ugly term "snogging" for kissing, or "rough sleeper" for homeless people, then I'm going to shoot myself.
 
2012-09-27 05:46:57 AM
Forsooth.
 
2012-09-27 05:50:50 AM
It might be CALLED english, but its our language, we will take what we want, and you will like it.
 
2012-09-27 05:52:08 AM
No need to start sledging.
 
2012-09-27 05:53:40 AM

alienated: FirstNationalBastard: Does British comedy transfer to the states as well as the drama does?

Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers


I think Cheers was American originally. You also forgot Blackadder and Fawlty Towers.

Obviously English is going to merge a lot more - there are plenty of Americanisms coming the other way as well of course, and no doubt as India/China grow and assuming they carry on using English for business then sooner or later lots more words from there will transfer across (British English already has quite a number of words derived from links with India, but most are old enough transfers for most people not to know their origins).
 
2012-09-27 05:54:32 AM

alienated: Aye, it does. Check out- Shameless- not, not the US version, the real one. Ideal . Spaced . Red Dwarf. The IT crowd has been mentioned. Only Fools and Horses . Porridge might, but its early / mid 70's .
Vicar of Dibley. Absolutely Fabulous .
I could go on, but you get the point, i hope.
Cheers


I think it depends on whether the show is "topical" or not.

2012 (an absurdist type comedy about the build up to the Olympics) may not have done as well as it was very topical, but very funny.

Rev and Miranda would probably do better.

Mrs Brown's Boys, if my parents are anything to judge by, would do brilliantly.

Mrs. Brown and the Mormons
 
2012-09-27 05:56:10 AM
The average American doesn't have all that good of a grasp on the English language anyway.

I blame hip/hop, texting, and MTV (not in that order).
 
2012-09-27 05:57:07 AM
Bally Jerry, pranged his kite right in the how's-your-father; hairy blighter, dicky-birded, feathered back on his sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harpers and caught his can in the Bertie.
 
2012-09-27 05:58:43 AM

SquiggsIN: The average American doesn't have all that good of a grasp on the English language anyway.


Irony?
 
2012-09-27 06:01:09 AM
What's all this, then?
 
2012-09-27 06:04:20 AM
Hate to break this to you Britain, but you talked more like we do prior to the Revolutionary War.

Not our fault you went all barmy on us after that.
 
2012-09-27 06:08:31 AM
I was in a thread the other day and was one of about half a dozen people recommending QI. Of course, I'm a Kiwi and we're a bit more culturally inclined towards British stuff, but we got a few converts. Enjoying the work of Stephen Fry is one of my personal litmus tests for whether I will probably like someone.
 
2012-09-27 06:09:55 AM
flowery twats.
 
2012-09-27 06:16:40 AM
As an Australian, I'm bombarded by both British and American culture all the time, so the distinctions here are lost on me.
 
2012-09-27 06:17:34 AM

thisispete: I was in a thread the other day and was one of about half a dozen people recommending QI. Of course, I'm a Kiwi and we're a bit more culturally inclined towards British stuff, but we got a few converts. Enjoying the work of Stephen Fry is one of my personal litmus tests for whether I will probably like someone.


You converted me on that show a few months back. Keep up the good fight!
 
2012-09-27 06:18:51 AM

Shadow Blasko: I blame Top Gear


Same here, and that's not a bad thing.
 
2012-09-27 06:26:25 AM
I was talking to my American friend (in Cambridge, UK but born and raised in the other Cambridge) and we were writing an email together; he asked me if we have 'dibs' over here (i.e., to 'have first dibs'). I was amazed because I always thought that 'dibs' was certainly an English thing, and not only that but a northern English thing. Having moved down south I suddenly realised that I had a vocabulary very different to my southern friends and I've got used to blaming our verbal misunderstandings on my Geordiespeak. From my internets research, it seems as though I might have picked up 'dibs' from American sources, somehow! Language is fascinating.
 
2012-09-27 06:28:02 AM
Go missing? Really?
 
2012-09-27 06:28:37 AM

Nick Nostril: Shadow Blasko: I blame Top Gear


Same here, and that's not a bad thing.


I find myself using "Oh Cock" and other James May-isms all the time.

"Give it the beans"... etc.

I have been saying boot instead of trunk since I was in Australia in 97. Just makes more sense. (as well as windscreen... Bonnet doesn't seem to fit, so I still say hood)
 
2012-09-27 06:30:57 AM
We're going to steal your words and there's nothing you can do about, you nancy boy tossers.
 
2012-09-27 06:31:32 AM
U wot m8
 
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