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(MSNBC)   Unobtanium obtained   (msnbc.msn.com) divider line 76
    More: Interesting, unobtainium, RIKEN, protons, particle accelerators, roentgenium, atoms, Japanese researchers, Japanese  
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9273 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Sep 2012 at 9:00 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-26 09:09:48 PM  
obtanium

ME RIKEY
AH SOOOOOOOOE
 
2012-09-26 09:11:17 PM  
Francium surrenders
 
2012-09-26 09:11:57 PM  
I expect Pandamonium.

Did they put it in a Hope Chest?
 
2012-09-26 09:14:24 PM  
should make Japan the first Asian country with naming rights to a member of the periodic table.

Darmstadtium - Roentgenium - Copernicium - Tentaclerapium - Flerovium - Ununpentium - Livermorium
 
2012-09-26 09:18:07 PM  
That's just plain cool.
 
2012-09-26 09:23:21 PM  
I'd shiat if they named it "Imodium".
 
2012-09-26 09:24:41 PM  
If confirmed, the achievement will mark the first time Japan has discovered a new element, and should make Japan the first Asian country with naming rights to a member of the periodic table.

Here comes tentaclerapeium
 
2012-09-26 09:29:26 PM  
Wait, I thought there were no new elements. Pretty sure that's what I heard anyway.
 
2012-09-26 09:31:36 PM  
If that particle decay pattern is correct, these little Japanese scientists may have solved our global helium shortage problem.
 
2012-09-26 09:33:12 PM  
They've got a week to synthesize 115 and name it Elerium.
 
2012-09-26 09:38:58 PM  
Why was I not told about this...oh, SNAP
 
2012-09-26 09:39:15 PM  
It's too bad they aren't Korean, then we could have Gangnamium.

\Heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeey sexy neutron
 
2012-09-26 09:42:35 PM  

Mr. Potatoass: I'd shiat if they named it "Imodium".


No, you wouldn't.
/Not if it worked correctly, anyway
///Hahaha poop joke
 
2012-09-26 09:45:17 PM  
It's the Roji-panty Complex.

s3.vidimg02.popscreen.com
 
2012-09-26 09:48:56 PM  
I really would like to see Feynmanium on the Periodic Table. Hopefully 137 will get it, assuming they get there in my lifetime.
 
2012-09-26 09:52:01 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: If that particle decay pattern is correct, these little Japanese scientists may have solved our global helium shortage problem.


Interestingly enough, I believe the decay series involving uranium, radon, etc. is responsible for helium deposits found in natural gas. Unfortunately, it's wildly inefficient to make helium from alpha decay of synthetic elements. For perspective, there are 7.2 x 1022 helium molecules in a normal balloon. Assuming every molecule of 113 yields 6 heliums, my rough calculation is 3.3 x 1018 metric tons of 113 to decay enough helium to fill a ballon.
 
2012-09-26 09:52:38 PM  

rjw00026: Wait, I thought there were no new elements. Pretty sure that's what I heard anyway.


Huh? These elements don't currently exist on earth but would have existed for a short term after the Big Bang. There may be other places in the universe where they exist, but they decay rather quickly into more familiar elements. This is just the first time they've been made in a lab
 
2012-09-26 10:05:46 PM  

rjw00026: Wait, I thought there were no new elements. Pretty sure that's what I heard anyway.


There's a theoretical stability island around element 126 (we're at element 118) and some theories suggest it isn't possible for elements to exist beyond that point. There are theoretical elements beyond that though, up to element 173.
 
2012-09-26 10:09:00 PM  

jcb274: AverageAmericanGuy: If that particle decay pattern is correct, these little Japanese scientists may have solved our global helium shortage problem.

Interestingly enough, I believe the decay series involving uranium, radon, etc. is responsible for helium deposits found in natural gas. Unfortunately, it's wildly inefficient to make helium from alpha decay of synthetic elements. For perspective, there are 7.2 x 1022 helium molecules in a normal balloon. Assuming every molecule of 113 yields 6 heliums, my rough calculation is 3.3 x 1018 metric tons of 113 to decay enough helium to fill a ballon.


Oops. Too rough of a calculation. I forgot to convert back to moles. Less staggering number: 5.5 grams. Unfortunately, that's still far too much. Scale up to what we actually use and we still need metric tons of 113 to replenish our helium. My other rough (but actually correct, I think) calculation is that the equivalent of 22,000 metric tons of Uranium 238 decays entirely each year to produce the estimated 3000 metric tons of He produced each year.
 
2012-09-26 10:11:02 PM  
I know I've read on here that that it's impossible because atoms don't have an age or something.
 
2012-09-26 10:11:21 PM  
I saw the video about this discovery, but it was heavily pixelated so I can't be sure.
 
2012-09-26 10:16:13 PM  
Good news, everyone! The element shall be named Farnsworthium!
 
2012-09-26 10:23:49 PM  
FTFA: If confirmed, the achievement will mark the first time Japan has discovered a new element, and should make Japan the first Asian country with naming rights to a member of the periodic table.

There have got to be more options here. Tentaclerapium is a good start, The All-Powerful Atheismo. Something benign might be Hatsunemikium. Pokemonium (They are trying to collect them all, after all), Otakium, Bukkakium. Traingropium. Pantsuvendium. Lolium. Hentium. Yurium. That sort of thing. Different from Floridium, but in the same vein.
 
2012-09-26 10:31:13 PM  
A new element? Quick, someone tell Harvard!

/There may be many more
//But they haven't been discovered
 
2012-09-26 10:46:50 PM  

The All-Powerful Atheismo: Tentaclerapium


Ha, I didn't read the thread when I wrote that, either.
 
2012-09-26 11:07:40 PM  

somemoron: Bukkakium.


I'm ok with this as long as they spell it Bukkake-yum
 
2012-09-26 11:10:51 PM  
So serious question for those who might know.

What's the big deal of creating an element that just quickly decays? what could be the possible use of unobtainium? Or anything that is just a "Hey look at what we made and decayed in 0.00000000000000000000000000000000000001ms into lead" ? (exaggerating of course)
 
2012-09-26 11:11:38 PM  
Godzirium
 
2012-09-26 11:21:52 PM  
Unobtainium always reminds me of The Core. Glob awful movie. The junk science is staggering at times... But I must admit it's a guilty pleasure of mine. Years of MST3K and Rifftrax has instilled in me a perversion for crappy movies.
 
2012-09-26 11:23:31 PM  

maq0r: So serious question for those who might know.

What's the big deal of creating an element that just quickly decays? what could be the possible use of unobtainium? Or anything that is just a "Hey look at what we made and decayed in 0.00000000000000000000000000000000000001ms into lead" ? (exaggerating of course)


To answer in a very basic and crude manner, practical science works when there is increased possibilities for the materials humans use. Optimization for the materials humans use is dependent upon the atoms that make up the larger objects. While on its own....an an unstable element is useless. Its instability can create wider possibilities when applied to other atoms to make a stable molecule or material that needs an increased functions.

In some ways, learning to create something this unstable can also unravel greater truths about particle physics.

Most of these "Golden Goose" experiments that work on a particle level are conducted in hopes of tying quantum mechanics and particle physics.
 
2012-09-26 11:25:14 PM  

maq0r: So serious question for those who might know.

What's the big deal of creating an element that just quickly decays? what could be the possible use of unobtainium? Or anything that is just a "Hey look at what we made and decayed in 0.00000000000000000000000000000000000001ms into lead" ? (exaggerating of course)


In theory, when you hit the stability island around 126, you can create stable elements with log half-lives. Also, different isotopes may show different properties. One isotope may only last a few milliseconds while a second one could last longer. While the practical applications are limited, it tells us a lot about the nature of atoms and subatomic particles and their interactions.
 
2012-09-26 11:25:55 PM  

DayDreamingD: Most of these "Golden Goose" experiments that work on a particle level are conducted in hopes of tying quantum mechanics and particle physics.


And it's also neat to see modern alchemy in action.
 
2012-09-26 11:27:19 PM  
Ah, ok ok ok, I got it, I got it, I got it. shiat I lost it.

/bonus points for knowing the source without google
 
2012-09-26 11:29:56 PM  
The IUPAC nomenclature race is on!

The ideal name would be,of course,hirohitonium.
 
2012-09-26 11:37:37 PM  
Mentat

"High Five" to that!
 
2012-09-26 11:43:56 PM  
What is the largest element actually used??

/something useful...
 
2012-09-26 11:51:53 PM  

ad_rizzle: rjw00026: Wait, I thought there were no new elements. Pretty sure that's what I heard anyway.

Huh? These elements don't currently exist on earth but would have existed for a short term after the Big Bang. There may be other places in the universe where they exist, but they decay rather quickly into more familiar elements. This is just the first time they've been made in a lab


No, none would have existed after the Big Bang either; the Big Bang couldn't produce anything heavier than lithium. Everything higher than atomic number 3 was produced only in supernovas. (I think there was an infinitesimally small amount of beryllium-9 in the predictions too, but I'm unsure.
 
2012-09-26 11:58:33 PM  

rjw00026: Wait, I thought there were no new elements. Pretty sure that's what I heard anyway.


Nobody's ever going to have a sample of these. They make a few atoms in an atom smasher and watch how they decay to get a better idea of how the pieces fit together in the first place.

ad_rizzle: rjw00026: Wait, I thought there were no new elements. Pretty sure that's what I heard anyway.

Huh? These elements don't currently exist on earth but would have existed for a short term after the Big Bang. There may be other places in the universe where they exist, but they decay rather quickly into more familiar elements. This is just the first time they've been made in a lab


Actually, no. They wouldn't have existed after the big bang. While the energy density was there the heavy elements hadn't had time to form.

maq0r: So serious question for those who might know.

What's the big deal of creating an element that just quickly decays? what could be the possible use of unobtainium? Or anything that is just a "Hey look at what we made and decayed in 0.00000000000000000000000000000000000001ms into lead" ? (exaggerating of course)


They have no use. It's about studying how they're put together.
 
2012-09-27 12:00:37 AM  

rogue49: What is the largest element actually used??

/something useful...


Probably californium, which is used in neutron sources for industrial radiography, petroleum exploration, mining, and some medical applications.
 
2012-09-27 12:25:29 AM  
Unagium?
 
2012-09-27 12:27:38 AM  
As far as I can tell Japan won't get naming rights because they didn't discover element 113, they only made it. Element 113 was already discovered by JINR, a group lead by Dawn Shaughnessy and Kenton Moody by watching element 115 decay into element 113 back in 2003. The Japanese team seems to have confirmed the findings by actually creating the element.

I could be completely wrong, but that seems to be the implication I'm getting.
 
2012-09-27 12:28:41 AM  
Clearly it should be named Nipponium.
 
2012-09-27 12:57:54 AM  

Professor Science: Probably californium, which is used in neutron sources for industrial radiography, petroleum exploration, mining, and some medical applications.


This is the 50 ton cask designed at Oak Ridge to transport Californium, a whole gram of it.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-09-27 12:59:03 AM  
If anyone is wondering, Californium has a density of 15.1 grams per cubic centimeter...
 
2012-09-27 01:30:33 AM  

WhyteRaven74: This is the 50 ton cask designed at Oak Ridge to transport Californium, a whole gram of it.


Why do they need a 50 ton cask to carry 1 gram? Radiation shielding?
 
2012-09-27 02:29:54 AM  
Let me know when they discover Element Zero. I want a Mass Relay.
 
2012-09-27 03:01:47 AM  
I wish they'd name it "Mankonium"

I would trade everything and a straw to break the camel to make that happen.
 
2012-09-27 03:04:33 AM  
Meconium, please.
 
2012-09-27 06:06:35 AM  

rjw00026: I know I've read on here that that it's impossible because atoms don't have an age or something.


Well naturally this element is stable and has useful properties to build starships with or something. We'll probably 3D print them at home because Elon Musk or something.
 
2012-09-27 06:15:49 AM  

jcb274: jcb274: AverageAmericanGuy: If that particle decay pattern is correct, these little Japanese scientists may have solved our global helium shortage problem.

Interestingly enough, I believe the decay series involving uranium, radon, etc. is responsible for helium deposits found in natural gas. Unfortunately, it's wildly inefficient to make helium from alpha decay of synthetic elements. For perspective, there are 7.2 x 1022 helium molecules in a normal balloon. Assuming every molecule of 113 yields 6 heliums, my rough calculation is 3.3 x 1018 metric tons of 113 to decay enough helium to fill a ballon.

Oops. Too rough of a calculation. I forgot to convert back to moles. Less staggering number: 5.5 grams. Unfortunately, that's still far too much. Scale up to what we actually use and we still need metric tons of 113 to replenish our helium. My other rough (but actually correct, I think) calculation is that the equivalent of 22,000 metric tons of Uranium 238 decays entirely each year to produce the estimated 3000 metric tons of He produced each year.


Since no one else is going to, thanks for that! Awesome post.

Also, I can't help but notice that that particular piece of science journalism was actually pretty darn good. Clear, concise, and yet with enough detail to keep laymen interested. Good work Journalist person.

/It doesn't happen very often, so you've got to appreciate it when it does...
 
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