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(Medical News Today)   Bosses have lower levels of stress than their employees, according to a recent study by a team of Harvard and Stanford experts, who have never had to manage a group of teenage employees   (medicalnewstoday.com) divider line 62
    More: Unlikely, Harvard University, chronic stress  
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1199 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Sep 2012 at 11:28 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-26 04:13:08 AM
Oh wait, you're serious.. LET ME LAUGH HARDER!

Seeing as I'm a boss at my workplace, I call total bullshiat on this. Let's see, making sure the quarterly reports are done, making sure everyone is following policy and guidelines, has received appropriate training, all the right paperwork has been filed on time.

Not to mention dealing with the higher ups who usually want the impossible done under budget with virtually no support, yeah... bullshiat.

If you're good at your job, and you have a good team. Then yes, the level of stress can be lower. But the higher your rank, the more responsibility you have. So saying that bosses have less stress than Joe Schmo employee on the lowest rung of the authority ladder, uh...no.
 
2012-09-26 04:41:17 AM
"Bosses have lower levels of stress than their employees, according to a recent study by a team of Harvard and Stanford experts, who have never had to manage a group of teenage employees"

If you are "managing" a group of teenage employees....then you are really stretching the title of "boss".

The whole reason I have eschewed being a supervisor is that no mid-level management position pays enough to deal with the bullshiat of being a mid-level manager. I'll take my 40 hrs and go home and never think about work -thank you very much.
 
2012-09-26 04:41:59 AM
It's been shown before that the lower you are on the company ladder, the higher your stress. Probably because you're dealing with on-the-job stress while making shiat money.
 
2012-09-26 05:07:30 AM

bingethinker: It's been shown before that the lower you are on the company ladder, the higher your stress. Probably because you're dealing with on-the-job stress while making shiat money.


That's also a good point, and it also really depends on the job as well. And the article looks like they only really dealt with white-collar jobs for their study, or that's the impression I got from it.

Without going into specifics, those at my job that I manage, have told me on many occasions, even though they make less than me, they'd never want to do my job, since it would involve my workload.
 
2012-09-26 10:58:58 AM
Seems pretty reasonable, bosses generally have more money than their employees. The stress around getting some project done at work is nothing compared the stress of not being able to feed your family I'd imagine.
 
2012-09-26 11:08:31 AM

strangeluck: Oh wait, you're serious.. LET ME LAUGH HARDER!

Seeing as I'm a boss at my workplace, I call total bullshiat on this. Let's see, making sure the quarterly reports are done, making sure everyone is following policy and guidelines, has received appropriate training, all the right paperwork has been filed on time.

Not to mention dealing with the higher ups who usually want the impossible done under budget with virtually no support, yeah... bullshiat.

If you're good at your job, and you have a good team. Then yes, the level of stress can be lower. But the higher your rank, the more responsibility you have. So saying that bosses have less stress than Joe Schmo employee on the lowest rung of the authority ladder, uh...no.


Can I have fries with that?
 
2012-09-26 11:31:01 AM
Yeah I've seen what my boss has to deal with...no thank you. If I have to keep the same title for the next 20 years, that's a small price to pay for not having to deal with the whiny, back-stabbing, kingdom-building, or just outright incompetent department managers she has to deal with.
 
2012-09-26 11:31:02 AM
Keeping a fifth of whiskey in your desk helps.
 
2012-09-26 11:33:12 AM

bingethinker: It's been shown before that the lower you are on the company ladder, the higher your stress. Probably because you're dealing with on-the-job stress while making shiat money.


something along these lines. work is less stressful than life. no matter how stressful your job is, it's your life that will take you down.

for example, when do soldiers have problems with stress? when they come home, not when they are at war.

some with workers. no matter how bad your job stress level is, it shuts off when you leave, and you also can take the stress because you know it's for a purpose. hardwork, not stress. but, then you get home and you can't pay the bills. that's stress.
 
2012-09-26 11:33:26 AM
I manage people, but am in now way shape or for "THE" boss. "THE" boss is generally someone who sits back and lets the peons (even upper-level management is not "the" boss). I believe they're referring to CEO's.
 
2012-09-26 11:33:54 AM

strangeluck: Oh wait, you're serious.. LET ME LAUGH HARDER!


My boss has been known to take two-hour lunches to send out his ebay shipments or buy video games on craigslist, on days when we're so busy his employees are literally crying in the stairwell, so I'm really getting a kick out of your butthurt

/Insurance is where dreams go to die
 
2012-09-26 11:34:14 AM
jewishmag.com

The repetitive motion is murder on their shoulders, but nothing a good poultice of shredded cash mixed with the tears of orphans won't cure.
 
2012-09-26 11:34:18 AM

tuxq: I manage people, but am in now way shape or for "THE" boss. "THE" boss is generally someone who sits back and lets the peons (even upper-level management is not "the" boss). I believe they're referring to CEO's.


*"no way shape or form"

/ftfm
 
2012-09-26 11:34:23 AM
I believe it.

A boss can delegate, that's gotta relieve some stress.

Boss also typically make more money than their employees, meaning they (should) have more financial security and less living paycheck to paycheck.
 
2012-09-26 11:35:22 AM

strangeluck: Oh wait, you're serious.. LET ME LAUGH HARDER!

Seeing as I'm a boss at my workplace, I call total bullshiat on this. Let's see, making sure the quarterly reports are done, making sure everyone is following policy and guidelines, has received appropriate training, all the right paperwork has been filed on time.

Not to mention dealing with the higher ups who usually want the impossible done under budget with virtually no support, yeah... bullshiat.

If you're good at your job, and you have a good team. Then yes, the level of stress can be lower. But the higher your rank, the more responsibility you have. So saying that bosses have less stress than Joe Schmo employee on the lowest rung of the authority ladder, uh...no.



You make more money, have better benefits, and (in most cases) will be the one who lays people off, rather than the one being laid off.
 
2012-09-26 11:36:35 AM
One way that they have less stress is financial. They are more able to pay their bills.

The other is that they know how to delegate, which is a skill that helps reduce a lot more stress.

At the top levels all they typically do is negotiate and monitor with their time and occasionally have to create and give presentations. There is stress when times are bad if they have enough of a heart to feel something when they fire people.
 
2012-09-26 11:36:36 AM
DNRTFA.

But I can see this being broadly true. Yes, higher levels often come with more challenging and stressful tasks. But lower level positions come with lower or nonexistent opportunities to feel a sense of control. I'm NOT saying middle management has a lot of actual freedom, but more so than the line worker. So while stresses may be higher for the boss, perceived opportunities for controlling that environment-- or at least providing feedback about it-- are higher too, which is an outlet that lowers stress.

Stress is often (if not always) about degree of control, perceived or real.
 
2012-09-26 11:37:37 AM
The level boss usually gives more experience points, though.
 
2012-09-26 11:37:41 AM

strangeluck: Oh wait, you're serious.. LET ME LAUGH HARDER!

Seeing as I'm a boss at my workplace, I call total bullshiat on this. Let's see, making sure the quarterly reports are done, making sure everyone is following policy and guidelines, has received appropriate training, all the right paperwork has been filed on time.

Not to mention dealing with the higher ups who usually want the impossible done under budget with virtually no support, yeah... bullshiat.

If you're good at your job, and you have a good team. Then yes, the level of stress can be lower. But the higher your rank, the more responsibility you have. So saying that bosses have less stress than Joe Schmo employee on the lowest rung of the authority ladder, uh...no.


A can't agree more. I was in management for 15 years and I worked like a slave. I moved out of a management role and my stress level dropped to nearly nothing. No multiple projects to keep up with, no tedious reports, far fewer meetings, no personnel bullshiat, etc. Having said that, I do believe that C officers have relatively un-stressfull jobs. All they do is go to meetings, make bad decisions, and leave everything else to the VPs and directors.
 
2012-09-26 11:38:37 AM
who have never had to manage a group of teenage rural, redneck, illiterate but figured out exactly how to game workers comp employees

FTFY
 
2012-09-26 11:40:38 AM

strangeluck: Oh wait, you're serious.. LET ME LAUGH HARDER!

Seeing as I'm a boss at my workplace, I call total bullshiat on this. Let's see, making sure the quarterly reports are done, making sure everyone is following policy and guidelines, has received appropriate training, all the right paperwork has been filed on time.

Not to mention dealing with the higher ups who usually want the impossible done under budget with virtually no support, yeah... bullshiat.

If you're good at your job, and you have a good team. Then yes, the level of stress can be lower. But the higher your rank, the more responsibility you have. So saying that bosses have less stress than Joe Schmo employee on the lowest rung of the authority ladder, uh...no.


I see you were Peter Principled. Congratulations. You've been elevated to the precise level of your incompetence.
 
2012-09-26 11:41:57 AM
Most bosses become lazy farks who sit on their asses and rag out their staff to relieve stress.
 
2012-09-26 11:43:15 AM

bingethinker: It's been shown before that the lower you are on the company ladder, the higher your stress. Probably because you're dealing with on-the-job stress while making shiat money.


You are also having your bosses stress offloaded on you. New trends include self-managing teams with "leaders" who keep them "on task". The teams report to their leaders with the figures, the leaders present those figures in meetings and reports back to the team about priorities. People above them do all the thinking, people below them do all the work. If you're a middle manager, and you're stressed out, you're bad at delegating, not cut out for management, or you're a genuinely good person. One of the three.
 
2012-09-26 11:44:41 AM

rev. dave: One way that they have less stress is financial. They are more able to pay their bills.

The other is that they know how to delegate, which is a skill that helps reduce a lot more stress.

At the top levels all they typically do is negotiate and monitor with their time and occasionally have to create and give presentations. There is stress when times are bad if they have enough of a heart to feel something when they fire people.


And travel. But if you find travel stressful then don't get a job that requires travel. Boom stress relief.
 
2012-09-26 11:49:23 AM
Stress
Rolls
Down
Hill
 
2012-09-26 11:51:53 AM
Bosses at the levels and in the positions they studied for this "finding", yes:

Stanford and Harvard experts analyzed cortisol amounts, as well as self-reported anxiety levels, among a group that has not been studied often - military officials from a Harvard executive leadership program and high ranking government.

- those are people who generally excel at what they have chosen to do and are driven to do even better. When that drive to results in success or brings a welcome challenge they experience lower stress than you would find in someone driven only enough to make it through each day, dreading the trials tomorrow will bring and avoiding any hard stuff along the way. See for example the average rank-and-file American corporate worker. Doing just enough to not get fired can be pretty damn stressful.

Also, love the "that's not a real job" mentality associated with some of the comments in this thread. America has plenty of mid-level paper-pushers, people have to do other things as well. It's all work.
 
2012-09-26 11:53:18 AM
This guy looks totally stressed out
filmaholics.net
 
2012-09-26 11:54:33 AM
From my experience, being the salaried boss and responsible for controling payroll etc etc when you're supervising hourly employees there is a lot of stress involved. Particularly in a beat up economy like this. There are more demands put on the salaried person to make sure it gets done, while you can delegate it, sometimes the purse strings on the payroll zip closed and you take it on yourself due to upper management b.s.

/just my 2 cents
 
2012-09-26 11:56:38 AM
Bosses are the laziest farking employees I've ever had the misfortune to work with and anyone who doesn't admit to that fact is probably one of them. They constantly show up late and leave early, spend two or three hours at lunch as opposed to the half hour or hour most of us get, and have no qualms about wasting more hours on the internet or just leaving the office entirely to handle personal business. Sure, I've had bosses that worked their way up and kept things running smoothly because they took the time and effort into learning how to do everyone's job, but your average boss usually can't handle the job of a regular employee because they never did it to begin with. More often than not, they knew someone in the company that got them a supervisor's position which allows them to dump all their work on the employees beneath them... often with the promise that they'll be the boss someday if they just keep it up. If a boss' work and contribution to the company was monitored even half as much as most companies do the average employee, this rampant nepotism and incompetence would finally get the ass kicking it deserves.
 
2012-09-26 11:58:03 AM
I cannot believe this is even remotely true if the "boss" is a doctor, running their own practice.

If you're gonna cite "golf playing docs" as a counterpoint, just...don't.
 
2012-09-26 11:58:11 AM

strangeluck: Oh wait, you're serious.. LET ME LAUGH HARDER!

Seeing as I'm a boss at my workplace, I call total bullshiat on this. Let's see, making sure the quarterly reports are done, making sure everyone is following policy and guidelines, has received appropriate training, all the right paperwork has been filed on time.

Not to mention dealing with the higher ups who usually want the impossible done under budget with virtually no support, yeah... bullshiat.

If you're good at your job, and you have a good team. Then yes, the level of stress can be lower. But the higher your rank, the more responsibility you have. So saying that bosses have less stress than Joe Schmo employee on the lowest rung of the authority ladder, uh...no.


Yeah...I'm going to need those TPS reports today.


/just promoted to supervisor
//stressed out
 
2012-09-26 12:03:43 PM
It depends on the people involved. The last place I was at the General Manager was a complete bozo.
To him, everybody (with the exception of his hand chosen executive staff) was expendable. This clown expected his employees to arrive early, work through lunch and leave late. Overtime was required, overtime pay was impossible. He also expected employees to contribute to his favorite charity.

Stress did not affect him, he was a carrier.
 
2012-09-26 12:03:48 PM
My boss is only worried about his bonus and ensuring there's only one person to do the job of two people to make that bonus even bigger.
 
2012-09-26 12:04:01 PM

BeesNuts: rev. dave: One way that they have less stress is financial. They are more able to pay their bills.

The other is that they know how to delegate, which is a skill that helps reduce a lot more stress.

At the top levels all they typically do is negotiate and monitor with their time and occasionally have to create and give presentations. There is stress when times are bad if they have enough of a heart to feel something when they fire people.

And travel. But if you find travel stressful then don't get a job that requires travel. Boom stress relief.


We bought a company that while headquartered here in the US, all their facilities and employees are in India (yeah, I'm not happy about this). One of our senior VPs has already made four trips to India this year and may have to make two more before Christmas. He is usually gone for two to three weeks at a time. He has a family and he has to attend to his work responsibilities back here in the US. India is 9.5 hours ahead of us, so he often has to get up at 3am for a late afternoon management meeting here. His days are typically 16-18 long when he is there. It takes 22 hours to get back from there and he often lands on the return trip and comes straight to the office for several hours of meeting. He can deal with the jet lag later. If anyone doesn't understand that this is extremely stressful, they aren't working off of a fully functional mind.
 
2012-09-26 12:04:26 PM
I call BS on this too. When I was a starting out as a tech/low level engineer, sure there was stress. Partly due to inadequate supervision and incompetent supervision. Other than that, at the end of my day I was done, went home, drank beer, whatever. Didn't have to think, could go to work hungover, and if something got farked up, say oops.

Now, as a supervisor I have tons of stress. Everything is my responsibility. SOmething breaks? I have to figure out if we can do without it, and for how long. Or arrange a rental. And fight with our idiotic purchasing system to make simple farking purchases. Then call customers and rearrange with them.

If one of my employees farks up? Have to call the customer back, costing us time and money, as well as embarrassment. When you've got so many people doing so many things, having to call back multiple customers starts really wearing on you. Then sales biatches at you for losing customers because your employees farked up. Closer supervision would help prevent some of these issues. Except I am swamped with work, so the preventative things fall by the wayside.

So yes, far more stress than when I was not a supervisor.
 
2012-09-26 12:05:07 PM

SageC: Bosses are the laziest farking employees I've ever had the misfortune to work with and anyone who doesn't admit to that fact is probably one of them. They constantly show up late and leave early, spend two or three hours at lunch as opposed to the half hour or hour most of us get, and have no qualms about wasting more hours on the internet or just leaving the office entirely to handle personal business. Sure, I've had bosses that worked their way up and kept things running smoothly because they took the time and effort into learning how to do everyone's job, but your average boss usually can't handle the job of a regular employee because they never did it to begin with. More often than not, they knew someone in the company that got them a supervisor's position which allows them to dump all their work on the employees beneath them... often with the promise that they'll be the boss someday if they just keep it up. If a boss' work and contribution to the company was monitored even half as much as most companies do the average employee, this rampant nepotism and incompetence would finally get the ass kicking it deserves.


Where do you work? That sounds like a pretty sweet gig. It also sounds entirely unlike any management or supervisory job I've ever had.

In my current position I'm under more constant scrutiny than my employees and their performance is considered to be entirely my responsibility. Sure, if they fail they get fired first but there would quickly come a point where I would have to answer for why I'm failing to produce effective employees in the first place.

Turnover is not cheap.
 
2012-09-26 12:05:12 PM
There is no way this is true because its not like this for me. Therefore its like this for everyone.
 
2012-09-26 12:09:03 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com

I have eight different bosses right now.
 
2012-09-26 12:10:51 PM

bingethinker: It's been shown before that the lower you are on the company ladder, the higher your stress. Probably because you're dealing with on-the-job stress while making shiat money.


Agreed. I'm the chief yabbo for a small tech biz, and it can be exceedingly stressful, between finding work, dealing with clients & silly inter-employee issues, and just getting shiat done on time and on budget. Making payroll hasn't been an issue for the recent past, but I've had those days too, and that'll burn a hole in your gut right quick.

But... I enjoy what I do, my schedule is (mostly) my own, and I'm the one deciding what we put our money & time into. If I don't like a client or project, it's up to me whether we keep or drop them. My employees have input, but ultimately, it's my call.

So, the financial benefit is nice - if my car caught fire tonight, I can just buy another one tomorrow; it's not a transportation-or-food decision - but for me at least, having the final word helps dampen the stress. I feel like I'm either choosing to deal with what stressors there are, or that I can at least try to change the root causes.
 
2012-09-26 12:18:11 PM
This sure sounds like herp derp to me.

People on the front lines certainly do experience high stress. People in charge of managing them also feel high stress only they deal with even more problems and usually the ones the front line person found too stressful.
 
2012-09-26 12:22:04 PM

A Shambling Mound: SageC: Bosses are the laziest farking employees I've ever had the misfortune to work with and anyone who doesn't admit to that fact is probably one of them. They constantly show up late and leave early, spend two or three hours at lunch as opposed to the half hour or hour most of us get, and have no qualms about wasting more hours on the internet or just leaving the office entirely to handle personal business. Sure, I've had bosses that worked their way up and kept things running smoothly because they took the time and effort into learning how to do everyone's job, but your average boss usually can't handle the job of a regular employee because they never did it to begin with. More often than not, they knew someone in the company that got them a supervisor's position which allows them to dump all their work on the employees beneath them... often with the promise that they'll be the boss someday if they just keep it up. If a boss' work and contribution to the company was monitored even half as much as most companies do the average employee, this rampant nepotism and incompetence would finally get the ass kicking it deserves.

Where do you work? That sounds like a pretty sweet gig. It also sounds entirely unlike any management or supervisory job I've ever had.


Sounds like you're not the actual "boss" then and one of the people in the middle doing all the work. I've held supervisory positions where I was responsible for the work of several employees as well. After working in dozens of offices and several years in the newspaper industry before jumping ship to work with software, it amazes me how prevalent this issue is whether it's independent developers or major production companies.

Turnover is not cheap.

That's ok, the companies that practice it often usually are.
 
2012-09-26 12:24:08 PM
"I don't get ulcers; I give them." Harold Geneen, dead president of ITT Corp.
 
2012-09-26 12:29:03 PM

SageC: If a boss' work and contribution to the company was monitored even half as much as most companies do the average employee, this rampant nepotism and incompetence would finally get the ass kicking it deserves.


When you're a manager you don't 'do', you 'manage.' You get the right people on your team, get them the information and the tools they need to get the work done and then get out of their way. You also need to stop customers or other departments from disrupting the flow of the work, so you're a buffer between the outside world and the work getting done. Measuring what your employees' accomplish is precisely how a manager should be measured.

/been in and out of the supervisory role a few times
 
2012-09-26 12:31:24 PM
As someone who has been making crap money in low positions for ages, bu suddenly got promoted to head of my department, and discovered that nobody over me actually knows what I do?

Damn it feels good to be a gangster.
 
2012-09-26 12:32:49 PM

strangeluck: Oh wait, you're serious.. LET ME LAUGH HARDER!

Seeing as I'm a boss at my workplace, I call total bullshiat on this. Let's see, making sure the quarterly reports are done, making sure everyone is following policy and guidelines, has received appropriate training, all the right paperwork has been filed on time.

Not to mention dealing with the higher ups who usually want the impossible done under budget with virtually no support, yeah... bullshiat.

If you're good at your job, and you have a good team. Then yes, the level of stress can be lower. But the higher your rank, the more responsibility you have. So saying that bosses have less stress than Joe Schmo employee on the lowest rung of the authority ladder, uh...no.


I bet if Joe Schmo offered to trade places with you, you wouldn't jump at the chance.
 
2012-09-26 12:37:04 PM
Also the first one to catch a bullet when Shiatcanned McWorkviolence comes back in the door. Dunno if I'd be too relaxed.
 
2012-09-26 12:37:13 PM
People on the very top have a lot of responsibility, but they also have the power and freedom to create solutions and good pay.
People on the very bottom have to deal with the customers, have no power to change rules that are counter productive and get poor pay.
People in the middle have the worst of both worlds
 
2012-09-26 12:37:46 PM

bifford: .

I bet if Joe Schmo offered to trade places with you, you wouldn't jump at the chance.


That is a non sequitur

just because he wouldn't trade places does not mean that he does not experience more stress.
 
2012-09-26 12:40:28 PM
Also the first one to catch a bullet when Shiatcanned McWorkviolence comes back in the door. Dunno if I'd be too relaxed.

Don't be silly, that would be the receptionist or the guy's secretary. Bosses are hidden away from threats like that.
 
2012-09-26 12:41:05 PM

bingethinker: It's been shown before that the lower you are on the company ladder, the higher your stress. Probably because you're dealing with on-the-job stress while making shiat money.


My on-the-job stress level is directly related to how much at-home stress my job enables me to avoid.

You pay me enough to take the girly out often enough to keep her quiet, maintain my health insurance, hire somebody to mow the lawn, and pay my bills, suddenly, I'm a more relaxed, focused, productive employee.

It's insane how that works.
 
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