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(BBC)   10 things people want to see in world history books but are usually missing. And no, "a centerfold" did not make the list   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 8
    More: Interesting, Andrew Marr, University of Manitoba, German states, crop yields, chemical weapons, optics, human history, Charlemagne  
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6095 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Sep 2012 at 10:55 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-25 11:10:25 AM
2 votes:
I'm happy to see Hammurambi's Code on the list. If nothing else, maybe it'll shut up the farking Bible-thumpers who think our laws are based on the 10 Commandments. So few people have even heard of it, let alone understand its significance.
2012-09-25 12:38:17 PM
1 votes:

theorellior: The headline raises a good question: which historical figure would we want to see a centerfold of?


Lady Godiva seems an obvious choice.
2012-09-25 12:14:47 PM
1 votes:

bhcompy: pute kisses like a man: bhcompy: brigid_fitch: bhcompy: Errr, we spent a significant amount of time in middle school world history on Hammurabi's Code. Perhaps in England it is not focused on?

Then you were one of the lucky ones. I didn't hear about it until Freshman year high school and even then it was glossed over.

Strange... then again, same thing goes for pute kisses like a man talking about the French Revolution. We spent a lot of time on it in middle school and high school(both the revolution and France in general(for some reason I still remember having to write an enormous report on Eleanor of Aquitaine over spring break one year)). And this was a public school education

we dealt with the french revolution a little in high school, but it was really unsatisfactory. Not until I studied more did i realize what was going on. in high school, they basically said, the french saw the american revolution and wanted to copy it. close your books and move on.

I studied the french revolution a lot in college, my last year of a philosophy degree spent a lot of time with the french enlightenment for some reason, which involved a lot of personal study into the revolution.

/ then, like the hammurabi code, we dealt with it a lot in law school. i'm in louisiana, so the code napoleon and the legal thought behind it is somewhat relevant to our own jurisprudence (though, it is important to note, we never had the napoleon code. the code took effect in france and her colonies in 1804. the louisiana purchase was 1803 -- so, tennessee williams got it wrong in a street car named desire... all the same, we modeled ours off the french)

It sounds like the extent of history most people get is essentially watching History of the World Part 1. I honestly find it strange, but I guess I was very lucky. My son now goes to the same schools and is getting a similar education(currently in 7th grade.. this year he's learning about Middle Eastern cultures and history, Mesopotamia, ...


In regards to History, I don't necessarily have a problem with the heavy focus on American/State history, however it is a problem that with each grade you cover the SAME exact thing. Year after year, until you get to High School you learn the exact same friggin stuff. Then you take Geography and European History, then back to US History. Asia? Africa? What? Those aren't covered almost at ALL. I didn't even get a glimpse of Egyptian History until college with surprisingly an ART HISTORY class. I graduated HS in 2002 and we effectively stopped right before the Vietnam War. Arguably the most important history, semi-current history is NOT taught because it is the last chapter or so in the textbook. So if they have time, and if kids are paying attention then because it is almost Summer or Christmas time, maybe you MIGHT get to current history...

Let's be real here also, they only teach in a manner for students to pass a test or standardized test. "Learning" does not happen in school anymore. Memorize for test, take test, pass, move on.
2012-09-25 11:25:51 AM
1 votes:

bhcompy: Errr, we spent a significant amount of time in middle school world history on Hammurabi's Code. Perhaps in England it is not focused on?


Well, that's the problem with the Mesopotamians. No one's ever seen them. No one's ever heard of their band.

Sargon, Hammurabbi, Ashurbanipal and Gilgamesh.
2012-09-25 11:11:58 AM
1 votes:

bhcompy: Errr, we spent a significant amount of time in middle school world history on Hammurabi's Code. Perhaps in England it is not focused on?


Then you were one of the lucky ones. I didn't hear about it until Freshman year high school and even then it was glossed over.
2012-09-25 10:59:40 AM
1 votes:
I always thought that we needed more info on the french revolution. it's wacky, and it's a little disappointing that american students never get an opportunity to pay attention to a revolution that was in many ways a whole lot more farked up then our little secession.
2012-09-25 10:36:25 AM
1 votes:
The one thing that history books don't do (and that James Burke did so well) is explain how all of history is connected. History, philosophy, literature, architecture, art, politics, music, religion, and science are all tied together and it often feels like they're all explored separately, instead of showing how one event flowed into another.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-09-25 10:29:15 AM
1 votes:
That is interesting. I remember a college student activity treasurer explaining her approach to double entry bookkeeping: when credit and debit did not balance, and they never did, she added a fictitious entry to one to make them balance. I still don't know if she was incompetent or embezzling.
 
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