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(CNBC)   Rural Arkansas town rethinks High School, wins   (cnbc.com) divider line 75
    More: Hero, student tests, Clinton Global Initiative, town, Mountain Home, Dwight Howard, high schools  
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17975 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Sep 2012 at 10:29 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-24 09:05:54 PM
Each of its 875 students were tested as freshmen, and based on their learning styles, skills, and interests, the students have chosen which academy to join.

www.entertainmentearth.com
 
2012-09-24 09:39:51 PM
Actually, the fact that they get to choose a path early is pretty innovative. If only it would catch on...
 
2012-09-24 09:51:06 PM
Unfortunately many of these students secured engineering jobs and proceeded to use their experience and expertise to build bridges, highways, and levees out of marshmallows and toothpicks.
 
2012-09-24 10:32:51 PM

brap: Unfortunately many of these students secured engineering jobs and proceeded to use their experience and expertise to build bridges, highways, and levees to get the fark out of marshmallows and toothpicks Arkansas.


FTFY

/the only winning move is not to play
//you just lost
 
2012-09-24 10:36:04 PM
Yeah sure.....but do they have a FOOTBALL team?
 
2012-09-24 10:38:40 PM
After reading the article, this really sounds like a good idea. High school is a much better time to learn that you hate your chosen career path than two semesters of college and thousands of dollars in debt.
 
2012-09-24 10:40:56 PM
while it shoots basketballs from the free throw line with better precision than Dwight Howard.

lol
 
2012-09-24 10:41:55 PM
It works so according to teacher's unions it'll never work
 
2012-09-24 10:44:09 PM
Of course they would make good engineers. Have you ever tried to make a big batch of your own corn likker or convert an 8mm Mauser over to a 30-06?
 
2012-09-24 10:45:55 PM
Oh, the miracle of ignoring the norm...

And down the hall, a third group of students is working on a team building exercise-competing against each other to build the tallest tower using nothing more than marshmallows and toothpicks

Considering I was given a team of strangers and a very similar task for a Schlumberger Engineering interview, this makes perfect sense.

/Then again, that was a non-verbal communications test
//Currently a book dealer.
 
2012-09-24 10:46:02 PM
sounds most excellent. i wonder if the stock market plug means this requires corporate sponsorship to work.
 
2012-09-24 10:46:03 PM
That's all great, but you cant let them forget about the most important thing of all... Abstinence.
 
2012-09-24 10:46:35 PM
It transformed itself from a traditional high school into one consisting of three academies--engineering, communications, and healthcare.

So, future graduates of ITT Tech and Hamilton/Kaplan.
 
2012-09-24 10:47:52 PM
The Great Pyramid of Arkansas
imageshack.us
 
2012-09-24 10:48:18 PM

CornFedIowan: It transformed itself from a traditional high school into one consisting of three academies--engineering, communications, and healthcare.

So, future graduates of ITT Tech and Hamilton/Kaplan.


Snark aside, this.
 
2012-09-24 10:49:39 PM
I was watching a program about something like this on CNN (go figure) last night, but it was about apprenticeships in various labor forces after high school. I thought it was pretty interesting how it'd been very successful in Germany and has begun being experimented with here in the US.

Honestly, students need more options than being forced into the notion that a four year education is for everyone and the only and best jobs can be gotten with those degrees. If there are companies hurting for workers, people that need jobs that only need the required skills, it seems self evident that encouraging companies to provide the training through apprenticeships would be the best for everyone.

But for some reason in this country, that sounds like "common" work thus has a negative stigma.
 
2012-09-24 10:53:23 PM
Anything that produces more engineers and less MBAs is better for the business world.
 
2012-09-24 10:54:01 PM
What a fortunate bunch of kids to have such innovative educators! I wish I had a mentor in my mid teens to show me the aptitude I have for the job I detest with every fiber in my body for reaching almost 40 years now.
 
2012-09-24 10:56:54 PM

Summoner101: But for some reason in this country, that sounds like "common" work thus has a negative stigma.


Actually, it's because 'common work' today often means backbreaking work that is being automated and with very small amount of pay and benefits.

That said, this seems like a good idea until you reach the point where you run into a flaw with the college-system upon its based: what happens when one of those career fields goes belly-up? I'm sure we need a lot of positions, but this drives down wages. The point of grade school is to make a well-rounded person who can go from one career to another with a minimum of difficulty. Part of the reason this 'academy' (is it a charter school? That opens up another round of problems) exists is to push students into three very different programs that may or may not be needed in the next five to ten years. What do you do with a student who has trained in one particular field for their entire high school career, only to be have no jobs for it?

The only difference between an academy like this and college is that you aren't on the hook for a lot of debt. But you're still in an economy with skills that may not be much in demand anymore.

I agree that grade school should be more difficult and open to various fields. That's a great idea. But to limit it to fields that just happen to be hiring right now is very short-sighted.
 
2012-09-24 10:58:34 PM
My money is on that none of these kids get laid on prom night.
 
2012-09-24 10:59:42 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Anything that produces more engineers and less MBAs is better for the business world.


While I agree with you about the MBA part, I think that the 50 percent of engineering graduates who can't find jobs might disagree with you. Producing more engineers when there's already a glut just drives down wages. Looking back at your comment, however, I realize that you are right -- lower wages for engineers IS better for the business world... although it sucks if you're a low-paid or unemployed engineer.
 
2012-09-24 11:00:12 PM
So do the Future Strippers of America go to the communications academy?
 
2012-09-24 11:00:41 PM
This is great, up until the point the fundie mouth breathers that live around them figure out that they are gettin' them thar high-falutin' idears about blasphemous things like the sun not going around the earth, the earth being more than a couple thousand years old, or reading something not the bible, and then try to either legislate them out, or simply burn them out. That is one of the worst places to actually to try to teach things.
I have in-laws there. They are painted as the local version of hardcore liberals due to the fact that they think we should nuke the middle east, exterminate all Muslims, and then forcibly exile all our hispanics to colonize the place and pump oil for us (yes, that counts as liberal there, due to the allowing the hispanics to live as opposed to including them in the genocide as well, like the rest of the right-thinking Arkansas Baptists around them)

/great idea, very wrong place to do it.
 
2012-09-24 11:02:10 PM

poe_zlaw: That's all great, but you cant let them forget about the most important thing of all... Abstinence.


In Arkansas? Yeah, that ain't going to happen.
 
2012-09-24 11:02:19 PM

Summoner101: I was watching a program about something like this on CNN (go figure) last night, but it was about apprenticeships in various labor forces after high school. I thought it was pretty interesting how it'd been very successful in Germany and has begun being experimented with here in the US.

Honestly, students need more options than being forced into the notion that a four year education is for everyone and the only and best jobs can be gotten with those degrees. If there are companies hurting for workers, people that need jobs that only need the required skills, it seems self evident that encouraging companies to provide the training through apprenticeships would be the best for everyone.

But for some reason in this country, that sounds like "common" work thus has a negative stigma.


My husband and I have three college degrees between us, but we've decided that if our children want to choose a path other than college, we're fine with that. Trade schools, apprenticeships, starting one's own business...these options have been marginalized in this country in favor of traditional college education. However, people are finally realizing that they are being sold a product that isn't worth the price. I'm glad to see that at least one school realizes that students should start sooner learning a trade, rather than later.
 
2012-09-24 11:03:44 PM

RogermcAllen: brap: Unfortunately many of these students secured engineering jobs and proceeded to use their experience and expertise to build bridges, highways, and levees to get the fark out of marshmallows and toothpicks Arkansas.

FTFY

/the only winning move is not to play
//you just lost



You fixed nothing!
 
/except my cat
//wish you hadn't used your teeth to do it
 
2012-09-24 11:06:13 PM
So it's more German style. In Germany you would begin interning in what we call high school at a company. You would have the job at that same company after you graduated.
 
2012-09-24 11:06:14 PM
Good article, but I in particular love how the comment section about a succeeding school has largely become an anti-teachers union / anti-democrat rant forum.

/Seems like people have a way of turning every non-political article into a partisan soap box these days.
 
2012-09-24 11:06:38 PM

bborchar: ...starting one's own business...these options have been marginalized in this country...


Which is a crucial failing of modern education.
 
2012-09-24 11:07:08 PM
So... it's less that they're doing anything new (all those club/activity things are actually things I ran into in normal high school at one time or another. I was actually on the robotics club, though we weren't allowed motors powerful enough to do the free-throw thing at the time, sadly.) and more that they've abolished sports and physical education and the students thus have no choice but to actually participate in academic clubs.

//That said, I approve of the idea of non-academic education. The world will always need academics, yes, but it doesn't need literally every single kid to grow up to be one. Mastering a craft is perfectly honorable.
 
2012-09-24 11:09:06 PM
"while it shoots basketballs from the free throw line with better precision than Dwight Howard. "

Such lofty standards

"It transformed itself from a traditional high school into one consisting of three academies--engineering, communications, and healthcare."

So what happens if you're one of the very few people who has no interest in the generous three options provided?
 
2012-09-24 11:10:01 PM
Sounds like my old high school, we were separated in 8th grade according to our interests and aptitudes into industrial trades, clerical trades or higher learning, industrial and clerical were not just mechanics and secretaries, they encompassed applied engineering and accounting, kids that were in the industrial and clerical branches were taught more practical math and applied sciences whereas the higher learning was more esoteric theoretical math and sciences as well as languages which were entirely optional in the ind and clerical sides, your junior year you started training in a specialty such as forestry, auto mechanics, AC&R, construction etc for industrial, clerical got bookkeeping accountancy and yes secretarial, whereas the higher learning got university prep. we had a near 100% graduation rate and most of us went on to have fairly decent careers, then in the mid 1970s a new superintendent convinced the school board that they were shortchanging the kids in the industrial and clerical fields because they were not prepping them for college and that was putting them at a supreme disadvantage in the modern era, fast forward to when my son graduated in the 80s and the grad rate was at about 60% with a unemployment rate of 20+% and those that did graduate and went on to university graduated with crushing debts to pay off.
It's about time that people woke up to the fact that nice as they are degrees are not necessary for a lot of jobs, identifying kids that could benefit more from trade schools and bringing back apprenticeship programs is only common sense, auto mechanics don't need 3 years of comparative literature at 1800 bucks a semester to fix my car (maybe a couple of courses in electrics theory and intro to programming might...)
 
2012-09-24 11:11:14 PM
Good idea, going with three sections. Slytherin would only have farked things up down the road.
 
2012-09-24 11:17:41 PM

slayer199: Actually, the fact that they get to choose a path early is pretty innovative. If only it would catch on...


At first I had the heebie-jeebies. Not get time to goof around and decide what you like? Then I realized... We don't give our kids that time already (witness the reaction to Occupy protests along the lines of "don't take basket-weaving"), so why not give them some darned skills. I'm not saying it couldn't be refined, but I like the concept.
 
2012-09-24 11:18:25 PM
One of the schools in my district has a limited version of this... it's only partially academies.

The upshot I got from one of its students: even if I decide not to keep this (in his case, nursing) as my permanent career, it'll be easier to pay for college if my day job pays $30-40K, instead of waiting tables.
 
2012-09-24 11:18:43 PM

Guntram Shatterhand: Summoner101: But for some reason in this country, that sounds like "common" work thus has a negative stigma.

Actually, it's because 'common work' today often means backbreaking work that is being automated and with very small amount of pay and benefits.

That said, this seems like a good idea until you reach the point where you run into a flaw with the college-system upon its based: what happens when one of those career fields goes belly-up? I'm sure we need a lot of positions, but this drives down wages. The point of grade school is to make a well-rounded person who can go from one career to another with a minimum of difficulty. Part of the reason this 'academy' (is it a charter school? That opens up another round of problems) exists is to push students into three very different programs that may or may not be needed in the next five to ten years. What do you do with a student who has trained in one particular field for their entire high school career, only to be have no jobs for it?

The only difference between an academy like this and college is that you aren't on the hook for a lot of debt. But you're still in an economy with skills that may not be much in demand anymore.

I agree that grade school should be more difficult and open to various fields. That's a great idea. But to limit it to fields that just happen to be hiring right now is very short-sighted.


The day we don't need engineers or healthcare workers would be when exactly?
 
2012-09-24 11:20:36 PM

Guntram Shatterhand: Summoner101: But for some reason in this country, that sounds like "common" work thus has a negative stigma.

Actually, it's because 'common work' today often means backbreaking work that is being automated and with very small amount of pay and benefits.

That said, this seems like a good idea until you reach the point where you run into a flaw with the college-system upon its based: what happens when one of those career fields goes belly-up? I'm sure we need a lot of positions, but this drives down wages. The point of grade school is to make a well-rounded person who can go from one career to another with a minimum of difficulty. Part of the reason this 'academy' (is it a charter school? That opens up another round of problems) exists is to push students into three very different programs that may or may not be needed in the next five to ten years. What do you do with a student who has trained in one particular field for their entire high school career, only to be have no jobs for it?

The only difference between an academy like this and college is that you aren't on the hook for a lot of debt. But you're still in an economy with skills that may not be much in demand anymore.

I agree that grade school should be more difficult and open to various fields. That's a great idea. But to limit it to fields that just happen to be hiring right now is very short-sighted.


If these students show an active interest in the academies they attend, does it do them any good to attend a college that a substantial part only attend for a piece of paper? If there are people that want to learn and there is a field they want to learn in, teach them the field. I agree there has to be some base knowledge that we all should codify, but this idea that you have to pay four years of your life before you're suddenly qualified for a good job is idiotic.

And, from what I watched, many of the "common" jobs that people are in apprenticeships for are fairly high tech, not "menial." It's just looked down on in this country because instead of having to get a degree, you're learning a trade, something that's been used successfully in human history for centuries.

As for these academies, healthcare, engineering, and communications are fairly broad fields with many disciplines. They're also fields that I don't think we're going to underutilize. How many people get sick? How many people use cars, bridges, or buildings? How many people talk on iPhones (I'm assuming the science of communications here)? The good thing about the specialties this academy chose is that they're not those that, at least the fundamentals, tend to not be needed.
 
2012-09-24 11:24:06 PM
Where are the Creationist academies?

media.tumblr.com
 
2012-09-24 11:29:52 PM

Fark Me To Tears: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier:
While I agree with you about the MBA part, I think that the 50 percent of engineering graduates who can't find jobs might disagree with you. Producing more engineers when there's already a glut just drives down wages. Looking back at your comment, however, I realize that you are right -- lower wages for engineers IS better for the business world... although it sucks if you're a low-paid or unemployed engineer.


There is currently a glut of engineers? I know in Australia that engineers are one of (if not the) most in demand graduates in the work force.

I find it difficult to believe that 50% of engineering graduates can't find jobs
 
2012-09-24 11:30:10 PM
I wish I had something like this growing up.
 
2012-09-24 11:33:31 PM

IntertubeUser: I wish I had something like this growing up.



You did, but in our day we called it Zoom.
 
2012-09-24 11:34:50 PM

deadcrickets: So it's more German style. In Germany you would begin interning in what we call high school at a company. You would have the job at that same company after you graduated.


Does the German company then fire you when you're 25-30 because it is cheaper to get interns and people fresh out of school?
 
2012-09-24 11:35:48 PM
This is a terrible idea. They've essentially turned their high school into a 21st century trade school. Most kids go into college not knowing exactly what they want to study, and that's after they've had a relatively broad high school experience. Engineering, communications, and health care? That's it? The sum of human education is engineering, communications, or health care? Yeah, a thirteen or fourteen year-old kid is ready to make that sort of decision.
 
2012-09-24 11:38:16 PM

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: This is a terrible idea. They've essentially turned their high school into a 21st century trade school.


What is so terrible about this?
 
2012-09-24 11:38:30 PM
Limit the fields? Limit the fields?!?!

Just about every single job possible start in these realms of learning. This is HIGH school. Not college, which should be use for more specific, technical learning as opposed to more high school, which it has become.

Also, arguing the idea that engineering and healthcare will go "belly up" is bat-shiat crazy, Romney-level derp. In fact the concept you are sharing makes him look intelligent in a kind-hearted sort of way instead of an evil, crushing-American-jobs-for-a-living sort of way.

Sorry, sorry. That was rude. Every farker are is more intelligent and kind than him.

/No exaggeration.
 
2012-09-24 11:38:46 PM

Hermit Tard: There is currently a glut of engineers? I know in Australia that engineers are one of (if not the) most in demand graduates in the work force.

I find it difficult to believe that 50% of engineering graduates can't find jobs


So, what you're saying is, engineers have skills that are in high demand in Australia, and therefore an engineer MAY be able to immigrate?
 
2012-09-24 11:39:31 PM

PapaChester: Every farker are is more intelligent and kind than him.


Strong.
 
2012-09-24 11:39:32 PM

poe_zlaw: That's all great, but you cant let them forget about the most important thing of all... Abstinence.


Also, don't talk about the gays or evolution. And pray before every class.
 
2012-09-24 11:47:25 PM

Hermit Tard: What is so terrible about this?


For one, the school presupposes the most "important" fields for the students, and excludes all else as worthwhile educational pursuits. This is problematic in a few ways, namely that as the job openings in the community change, the fundamental education that students in this school receive will inevitably change. If the school is successful and produces too many nurses? "Oops, time to swap out health care for money management." Furthermore should the goal of a high school be to broaden the intellectual horizons of students or to keep them living and working within the same communities they grew up in?

Something about this idea really grates on me, like they're grooming generations of automatons in order to fulfill some larger capitalistic goal for the community, completely forgetting that these students have interests and desires of their own.
 
2012-09-24 11:48:32 PM
Which one of those three does Assistant Crack Whore fall in?
 
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