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(Buzzfeed)   How Hollywood sound engineers create the noises for aliens, laser guns and dinosaurs. Hint: you can basically do it yourself in your backyard   (buzzfeed.com) divider line 39
    More: Interesting, sound engineer, laser guns, armed police, T-1000, rotors, gelatins, chimeras, dinosaurs  
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2248 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 Sep 2012 at 9:03 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-24 08:55:14 PM
fap
 
2012-09-24 09:08:25 PM
www.gigapolis.com
 
2012-09-24 09:16:10 PM
They found a guy named Wilhelm and made him scream?
 
2012-09-24 09:28:06 PM
if you're in the SF Bay Area, go visit the Oakland Museum of Calfornia; they have a "foley" (sound making) booth in the Hollywood/movie-making area (you can also make animations and fashion designs)

Go try it. Really! It's fun!
 
2012-09-24 09:36:41 PM
The Doctor Who theme was not played on a theremin. It was created with a "test tone generator" and a lot of manual cutting and splicing of tape.
 
2012-09-24 09:43:11 PM
The Star Wars blaster sound can be awesomely recreated with a Slinky and an appropriate tile ceiling, as I discovered by accident one day when it was really slow at the restaurant I worked at. In wicked 3D, too.
 
2012-09-24 09:49:31 PM

bloobeary: The Doctor Who theme was not played on a theremin. It was created with a "test tone generator" and a lot of manual cutting and splicing of tape.


www.hp.com

I had access to one of these while I was in HS. Yes, I was an AV geek (late 90's), but we were doing things you wouldn't see until YouTube came about.

I wish I'd had my video on VHS instead of 3/4" tape. So much lost to the advance of technology.
 
zez
2012-09-24 10:02:46 PM
 
2012-09-24 10:03:57 PM
In 1999, I was working for a radio station that was giving away tickets to a Santana concert. This was right after he won all the grammys for Supernatural.

We needed a "when you hear X call to win" sound effect.. So I worked up what it would sound like for Santana to trip falling down the stairs with his grammys. Basically involved putting a wireless mic inside a half-open box full of broken carts, CD cases, coffee mugs, and a couple of cowbells. Had the mic's receiver jacked into a production board, and threw it all down the stairs a few times.

Came out very nice. Wish I still had it.
 
2012-09-24 10:06:40 PM

Confabulat: The Star Wars blaster sound can be awesomely recreated with a Slinky and an appropriate tile ceiling, as I discovered by accident one day when it was really slow at the restaurant I worked at. In wicked 3D, too.


We used to whack the guy wires for telephone poles with sticks, pipes, bongs and rocks to get the blaster sounds.

Still, the best snapping knee sound is celery wrapped in either raw liver or ham.
 
2012-09-24 10:08:36 PM

wildcardjack: I had access to one of these while I was in HS.


If you haven't seen it, there's an amazing documentary called Alchemists of Sound about the workings of the BBC RadioPhonic Workshop, including a lot of detail about the recording and creation of the Dr. Who theme. It's all on YouTuibe, too.

Part one is here.
 
2012-09-24 10:21:15 PM
It's roar was the blended sounds of a distressed baby elephant, a tiger roaring and an alligator. It's breathing was the sound of a whale's blowhole

I have all of these in my backyard!
 
2012-09-24 10:27:09 PM
I have a friend that does sound for movies.  I will never forget the day we turned his speakers towards the windwo and unleashed his "War, Ammunition, and Explosives" soundbites  onto the unwitting residents of the tony Upper West Side of Manhattan.
 
People hit the dirt and ducked behind cars.  It was incredibly childish but I would say that he did a pretty damn good job.
 
He moved to L.A. but when he lived in the city he would walk around with a recorder and this parabolic microphone capturing everything on DAT.  It was fascinating to watch him work.
 
2012-09-24 10:35:24 PM
Is this where we share various Foley gags?

Awesome monster sound: slowly moving the plastic drinking straw in and out of a lidded but empty drink cup, slowed down a bunch in Audacity.

Snow-walking is squeezing a box of Argo corn starch.
 
2012-09-24 10:36:08 PM
On the other end of the spectrum is the THX "deep note" sound effect.

Some stuff on how it was made: http://www.earslap.com/instruction/recreating-the-thx-deep-note

Finally, here's the link for a listen.
 
2012-09-24 10:53:56 PM
Do they explain why even footsteps need to be 20-30 dB louder than the dialogue?
 
2012-09-24 11:09:30 PM

Vodka Zombie: We used to whack the guy wires for telephone poles with sticks, pipes, bongs and rocks to get the blaster sounds.


I understand using a pipe but that's a careless way to treat a bong.
 
2012-09-24 11:09:56 PM
Delia Derbyshire documentary for all you Dr. Who and sound design fans. And the "instrument" used for the Dr. Who theme was not a theremin, it was a Wobbulator.
 
2012-09-24 11:19:08 PM

Any Pie Left: Is this where we share various Foley gags?

Awesome monster sound: slowly moving the plastic drinking straw in and out of a lidded but empty drink cup, slowed down a bunch in Audacity.

Snow-walking is squeezing a box of Argo corn starch.



Ooh, I liked the corn starch one.  That is PERFECT!
 
2012-09-24 11:27:33 PM
I still think the coolest sci-fi sound effects sequence I've ever heard was in the 1965 Lost in Space episode "The Derelict". Near the end, John Robinson yells up to Don West to lift off. The Jupiter 2 is sitting inside of another, much larger spacecraft, so when Don executes the order, the Jupiter 2 roars to life inside what would be a giant echo chamber (if the whole thing was real). The music, combined with the various LIS sound effects for the thrusters and engines, echoed and all going at once, gives the lift-off-gear-up-and-rotate-for-exit model sequence a powerful kick. Not bad for a 1965 TV show. If you can watch this sequence, be sure to crank up the sound and push up the bass on your equalizer settings. If you've got it set right, it'll rattle the teeth out of your head.

/yes, Lost in Space
//I'm old
///off my lawn
 
2012-09-24 11:36:36 PM

Confabulat: Vodka Zombie: We used to whack the guy wires for telephone poles with sticks, pipes, bongs and rocks to get the blaster sounds.

I understand using a pipe but that's a careless way to treat a bong.


Hey, you make blaster sounds with whatever you have handy. Plus, you know, when your doper buddy gives you money and says "we need a pipe," it gets confusing.
 
2012-09-24 11:48:22 PM
When I was 14 or 15 my brother was attending Syracuse University. One of the coolest thing was he took me to the stadium where they had the fluted columns. I'll never forget the sound bouncing up and then back down.
 
2012-09-24 11:49:05 PM
I saw the head sound guy from 20th Century Fox talk once. His second favorite sound effect was slamming those wires with wrenches and things for the laser blasts, his first favorite was a malfunctioning air conditioner at a motel near Phoenix Arizona... that became the engine sound of the Millennium Falcon.
 
2012-09-24 11:56:01 PM
If I recall correctly, the roar of the Balrog from 'The Fellowship of the Ring" was created by scraping a cinder block along a sidewalk.
 
2012-09-25 12:03:24 AM

Any Pie Left: Is this where we share various Foley gags?

Awesome monster sound: slowly moving the plastic drinking straw in and out of a lidded but empty drink cup, slowed down a bunch in Audacity.

Snow-walking is squeezing a box of Argo corn starch.


I loved how Firesign Theatre worked the foleys in as part of the script.

"You'd better come in out of the cornstarch, before your feet get wet." - Catherwood the Butler (who also invited the guests to come sit by the cellophane and warm up)

(Of course, they also worked the script itself into the script: "I'm so lost!" - "We're at the bottom of Page Two." - or something like that, I forget exactly how it went now.)
 
2012-09-25 01:23:00 AM
"Ifukube also created Godzilla's trademark roar. Technicians at Toho originally went to the Tokyo Zoo and recorded the grunts and growls of several animals hoping to find the perfect sound effect for Godzilla's roar. Dissatisfied with the animal sounds they had collected, the technicians turned to Ifukube, an expert in acoustics, and asked him to produce the needed sound effect. After some experimentation, Ifukube recorded himself taking a resin-covered leather glove and dragging it along the loosened strings of a double bass (the largest and lowest pitched bowed orchestral string instrument) and slowed down the playback speed of the tape. The result was the now familiar Godzilla roar. Additionally, Ifukube created the sound of Godzilla's footfalls by striking an amplifier box with a large, knotted piece of rope."

from Link
 
2012-09-25 01:23:07 AM
Hollywood sound engineers? You mean like the ones that had an enormous budget for Avatar and instead of creating original sounds they took dinosaur sounds from Jurassic Park?
 
2012-09-25 01:43:52 AM

bhcompy: Hollywood sound engineers? You mean like the ones that had an enormous budget for Avatar and instead of creating original sounds they took dinosaur sounds from Jurassic Park?


There are a few sound effects albums that get used a lot in Hollywood. It's why even today when they show a video game the sound effects are either Atari 2600 Pac Man or Atari 2600 Donkey Kong because those sound effects were included on a very popular industry sound effects album. Some of these sound effects become very famous like the Wilhelm scream and directors put them in as a homage.
 
2012-09-25 01:51:44 AM
I read that the groan of a ship or building is a coin on dry ice. Got some with Omaha Stakes and tried it. You need to slow it down a lot and EQ it, but it's fun to watch it dance.

Every grade school science class should be able to play with dry ice. Fun/Educational.
 
2012-09-25 01:55:03 AM
*Steaks, garsh-dern-it.
 
2012-09-25 03:36:01 AM

Fark Me To Tears: I still think the coolest sci-fi sound effects sequence I've ever heard was in the 1965 Lost in Space episode "The Derelict". Near the end, John Robinson yells up to Don West to lift off. The Jupiter 2 is sitting inside of another, much larger spacecraft, so when Don executes the order, the Jupiter 2 roars to life inside what would be a giant echo chamber (if the whole thing was real). The music, combined with the various LIS sound effects for the thrusters and engines, echoed and all going at once, gives the lift-off-gear-up-and-rotate-for-exit model sequence a powerful kick. Not bad for a 1965 TV show. If you can watch this sequence, be sure to crank up the sound and push up the bass on your equalizer settings. If you've got it set right, it'll rattle the teeth out of your head.

/yes, Lost in Space
//I'm old
///off my lawn



Found it on Hulu:

Lost in Space: "The Derelict"

Start at 46:45 time elapsed / 4:45 time remaining ... and don't forget to crank up the volume. I believe I read somewhere that the Jupiter 2's engine sounds were recorded from the inside of some kind of electric power turbine as it was being started up and brought up to operating speed. I would love to get hold of a clean copy of that sound.
 
2012-09-25 06:41:22 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Any Pie Left: Is this where we share various Foley gags?

Awesome monster sound: slowly moving the plastic drinking straw in and out of a lidded but empty drink cup, slowed down a bunch in Audacity.

Snow-walking is squeezing a box of Argo corn starch.

I loved how Firesign Theatre worked the foleys in as part of the script.

"You'd better come in out of the cornstarch, before your feet get wet." - Catherwood the Butler (who also invited the guests to come sit by the cellophane and warm up)(Of course, they also worked the script itself into the script: "I'm so lost!" - "We're at the bottom of Page Two." - or something like that, I forget exactly how it went now.)




Nick Danger: Third Eye in Head them off at the Past. It has the best use (or misuse) of Foley work with great wordplay and miscues. Transcript
 
2012-09-25 08:19:23 AM
i do so love that hissing snakelike rattle of the TIE fighter blasters
 
2012-09-25 09:09:06 AM

godwin5: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Any Pie Left: Is this where we share various Foley gags?

Awesome monster sound: slowly moving the plastic drinking straw in and out of a lidded but empty drink cup, slowed down a bunch in Audacity.

Snow-walking is squeezing a box of Argo corn starch.

I loved how Firesign Theatre worked the foleys in as part of the script.

"You'd better come in out of the cornstarch, before your feet get wet." - Catherwood the Butler (who also invited the guests to come sit by the cellophane and warm up)(Of course, they also worked the script itself into the script: "I'm so lost!" - "We're at the bottom of Page Two." - or something like that, I forget exactly how it went now.)



Nick Danger: Third Eye in Head them off at the Past. It has the best use (or misuse) of Foley work with great wordplay and miscues. Transcript


O man, I've gotta dig that disc out and listen to that again today. I grew up listening to that record, and used to know every word of it.

There's a website I found years ago (but don't ask me where it is now) that explains all the hopelessly obscure in-jokes on their records.
 
2012-09-25 10:25:31 AM
Lets be honest.

Sound engineers no longer make sounds.

They use the same goddamn Wilhelm scream, the same giggling children, the same car engine that wont turn over, the same robot servo noises, and the same caned laughter that they heard on TV when they were children.

Modern foley work consists of looking up the word for the sound effect you want, pulling up a list of 10,000 sound effects that match the word, and picking the very first sound on the list. every. single. time.

/then they crank up the sound effects til they clip, and make the dialog nearly silent.
 
2012-09-25 10:27:48 AM

Ghastly: Some of these sound effects become very famous like the Wilhelm scream and directors put them in as a homage. because they want to ruin their movie by beating the fark out of a horse that died 40 years ago.

 
2012-09-25 11:07:59 AM

fluffy2097: /then they crank up the sound effects til they clip, and make the dialog nearly silent.


Watching movies at night, I have to constantly raise or lower the volume for newer releases. Older movies, not a single issue.

Assholes!
 
2012-09-25 11:33:17 AM

StoPPeRmobile: fluffy2097: /then they crank up the sound effects til they clip, and make the dialog nearly silent.

Watching movies at night, I have to constantly raise or lower the volume for newer releases. Older movies, not a single issue.

Assholes!


no no. It's not the sound engineers. The problem is you don't own a $1000 9.2.½ surround sound receiver, a 72 channel parametric equalizer with phase modulation, and a rack mount normalizer.

/Don't forget you'll need tube amps and anechoic foam.
 
2012-09-25 03:12:31 PM

StoPPeRmobile: Watching movies at night, I have to constantly raise or lower the volume for newer releases.


The worst was Law Abiding Citizen

whispered line
Shouted line
grunted line
soft eerie music
EXPLOSION
Shouted line
whispered line
silent glare
EXPLOSION
 
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