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(Paste Magazine)   Here's a list of the best Fall seasonal beers. Crack open a cold one and complain about why your favorite wasn't listed to the right   (pastemagazine.com) divider line 185
    More: Cool, seasonal  
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9172 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Sep 2012 at 8:50 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-24 10:43:53 PM

Friend of the Devil: I was going to say they forgot Blue Moon Winter Abbey Ale, but then ole stoned me realized that it has winter in the name... (but I saw it at a liquor store on Friday!)


That's the only Blue Moon I've had that I'd call truly special. My friends and I nursed the last of those for months after they went out of season this year. Then again, we only get the common Blue Moon varieties around here.


WinoRhino: The bad thing is they do too many styles, and the ones they throw out there (both of the above mentioned ones, for example) are mediocre. Their Saison was awful in my opinion. The rauchbier was the "look ma, I put smoke in it!" version of a real rauchbier. The "longshot" winners are novelty acts that annoy me.


This. Sam Adam's specialty or limited styles are often the worst beer you can get in their price tier. The Longshot brews are a trap designed to trick you out of money.

A few of their year-rounds and seasonals are decent values when they're on sale, but you can get a goddamn great beer for $9-12 a bomber or $10/4-pack. Sam Adams anything ain't one of them.  If you see a Sam Adams beer around that price range, you can just about never go wrong by not buying it.
 
2012-09-24 10:44:13 PM

Dr. Manhattan: Speaking of Fall beers, I've had really mixed experiences with PumKing. I had it on tap once and it was like drinking grandma's pumpkin pie. Had it out of a bottle and it was like eating canned corn off a piece of old cardboard.

Anyway, fall in New England is for cider, and homemade cider is always the best. Super easy too. Much easier than brewing. If I have 25 gallons of cider by November, I'll be a pretty happy man. Unfortunately the sh*tty spring we had apparently borked up the apple crop so cider is kinda stoopid expensive compared to previous years. Oh well, sang McWatt, what the hell.


Ya gotta look around and make connections. The place I get mine gives me a bulk discount. I picked up 11 gallons for about $50.

One batch has a traditional English Ale yeast working on it. The other has a Belgian Saison. If things go well I may do another two batches in a few weeks.

I did my first batch last year. I let it sit until January and the results were awesome. People were beside themselves about it.
 
2012-09-24 10:44:56 PM

WinoRhino: mudpants: But I want BEER, a beer that tastes like beer. ya hear?

When I am feeling that way: Weihenstephaner Original. Beer. Simple. Perfect.

How the heck can I spell that out to the drivethru crew in Brandt Ohio?
 
2012-09-24 10:45:10 PM
I usually go with Magic Hat's fall and winter seasonals, though. Helps that the brewery is about a mile down the road.
 
2012-09-24 10:46:31 PM
I would have had a better reaction when I was in Dexter Ohio but not much.
 
2012-09-24 10:48:53 PM
I got a friend in Pataskala, big city boy, that might kin to your talk.
 
2012-09-24 10:49:40 PM

WinoRhino: mudpants: But I want BEER, a beer that tastes like beer. ya hear?

When I am feeling that way: Weihenstephaner Original. Beer. Simple. Perfect.


Stone's Double Bastard.

It's the beeriest beer that ever beered. It's the beer that beers drink in the fine taverns and hobo tents of beersville, beersylvania. It's like a farking beer singularity.
 
2012-09-24 10:49:59 PM

res_nihil: fappomatic: Weyerbacher Heresy is much more interesting IMO. Even if it's not a traditional Oktoberfest brew.

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 383x350]

I love their Old Heathen beer. Last weekend I tried the Imperial Pumpkin Ale which was really good. Nice strong cinnamon-y flavor.


I'm extremely partial to Merry Monks. Wish I went to the brewery more often when I was in college.
 
2012-09-24 10:50:52 PM

fallingcow: WinoRhino: mudpants: But I want BEER, a beer that tastes like beer. ya hear?

When I am feeling that way: Weihenstephaner Original. Beer. Simple. Perfect.

Stone's Double Bastard.

It's the beeriest beer that ever beered. It's the beer that beers drink in the fine taverns and hobo tents of beersville, beersylvania. It's like a farking beer singularity.


I will try that !
 
2012-09-24 10:50:57 PM

Skarekrough: Ya gotta look around and make connections. The place I get mine gives me a bulk discount. I picked up 11 gallons for about $50.

One batch has a traditional English Ale yeast working on it. The other has a Belgian Saison. If things go well I may do another two batches in a few weeks.

I did my first batch last year. I let it sit until January and the results were awesome. People were beside themselves about it.


Okay folks, talk to me. I brew a LOT of beer and it would knock my wife out if I could make her homemade cider (her preferred booze over beer.) How hard is it, and do I need any special equipment aside from my standard all-grain brewing rig?
 
2012-09-24 10:54:01 PM

Joafu: YouSirAreAMaroon: residentgeek: Joafu: Am I the only one that just doesn't get why Sam Adams is profitable? And even the description in TFA was kinda sad. It's the only brewery I'll ever turn down, and that's after I've tried a good dozen of their flavors; the final straw was after trying the cherry wheat. It was just stinky, never before had I choked down a beer- nor since- usually if it's foamy and has alcohol, I'm game.

"Hey, you want another cherry wheat Sam Adams?" No thanks, I'm driving home tonight.

/party was at my house
//yeah yeah, whine about beer

I think you ignore the mass appeal of their Boston Lager. It's pretty damned good. Their seasonals are hit and miss, I'll grant--but I'll take Sam over "domestic" Bud or Coors any day, and not just because I'm a social beer justice warrior.

What he said. Good old Boston Lager is a solid, if uninteresting beer that's available damn near everywhere.

Well, I'll give it another go next time I just don't have anything else to get. Maybe my adult taste buds just hadn't come in yet and I couldn't appreciate it's finer qualities. Sounds like their seasonal is decent.

In happier news, I do love this time of year, and I did like TFA's New Belgian, only one I've tried so far. Yet another excuse to drink copious amounts of beer? Sure.


The thing with Sam Adams is that they still think like a microbrewery when it comes to their seasonals. A couple of years ago, they used WAY too much grains of paradise in their Summer Ale, and what used to be my favorite beer ended up tasting like formaldehyde and/or Southpaw. This year's Summer Ale was much better, and their Octoberfest is quite good too. That said, I despise their Cranberry Lambic and will only use it for making beer bread (it's very good in that).

The New Belgium, Abita, and Weyerbacher are all on my list of seasonals to try this year, perhaps the Ommegang if I can find it. Sierra Nevada is a maybe, and Sweetwater will hopefully be available when I visit the folks for Thanksgiving.
 
2012-09-24 10:56:19 PM

Skarekrough: People were beside themselves about it.


I've had a similar general experience which leads me to believe my friends are either genuinely impressed with my cidering prowess or are such good liars that they shouldn't be dealing with the likes of me. Either way, I was able to use my cider stock as currency to avoid starvation during last year's late September/early October Snowpocalypse. Anyway, you are correct that now is the time to make contacts. I've got a few leads on where to get "the good stuff" from. We'll see how it plays out.
 
2012-09-24 10:56:31 PM
I miss being able to get New Belgium. Fat Tire is a solid "can't decide on anything else" standby, and I dig the Mothership Wit and 1554. I've heard good things about the Ranger IPA too.
 
2012-09-24 10:56:33 PM

WinoRhino: Mr. Chainsaw: Octoberfest and Winter Ale are their best offerings, IMO. I don't care for their spring and summer styles, though the Latitude 48 IPA isn't too bad.

I really liked Noble Pilsner. But Sam Winter is solid, yeah.


White Ale was Sam's best seasonal, and they broke my heart when they got rid of it for Noble Pils.

/Drinking a homemade black IPA
//gonna try to make a ESP (pumpkin bitter) this weekend
 
2012-09-24 10:57:45 PM

WinoRhino: Skarekrough: How hard is it, and do I need any special equipment aside from my standard all-grain brewing rig?


start with apples
 
2012-09-24 10:57:57 PM

melopene: This year's Summer Ale was much better


Did you hear that they lost their entire final batch of summer ale? That's why pumpkin and oktoberfest hit the scene earlier than usual.
 
2012-09-24 10:58:56 PM

mudpants: WinoRhino: Skarekrough: How hard is it, and do I need any special equipment aside from my standard all-grain brewing rig?

start with apples


*jots down*
Go onnnnn.......
 
2012-09-24 11:01:32 PM

WinoRhino: melopene: This year's Summer Ale was much better

Did you hear that they lost their entire final batch of summer ale? That's why pumpkin and oktoberfest hit the scene earlier than usual.


Huh. I wondered why it was so early.
 
2012-09-24 11:02:44 PM

WinoRhino: melopene: This year's Summer Ale was much better

Did you hear that they lost their entire final batch of summer ale? That's why pumpkin and oktoberfest hit the scene earlier than usual.


WinoRhino: Skarekrough: Ya gotta look around and make connections. The place I get mine gives me a bulk discount. I picked up 11 gallons for about $50.

One batch has a traditional English Ale yeast working on it. The other has a Belgian Saison. If things go well I may do another two batches in a few weeks.

I did my first batch last year. I let it sit until January and the results were awesome. People were beside themselves about it

Okay folks, talk to me. I brew a LOT of beer and it would knock my wife out if I could make her homemade cider (her preferred booze over beer.) How hard is it, and do I need any special equipment aside from my standard all-grain brewing rig?


I would check /r/homebrewing on Reddit as well as the Fark Homebrewer's google group.
 
2012-09-24 11:02:59 PM

WinoRhino: Skarekrough: Ya gotta look around and make connections. The place I get mine gives me a bulk discount. I picked up 11 gallons for about $50.

One batch has a traditional English Ale yeast working on it. The other has a Belgian Saison. If things go well I may do another two batches in a few weeks.

I did my first batch last year. I let it sit until January and the results were awesome. People were beside themselves about it.

Okay folks, talk to me. I brew a LOT of beer and it would knock my wife out if I could make her homemade cider (her preferred booze over beer.) How hard is it, and do I need any special equipment aside from my standard all-grain brewing rig?


All you need is apple juice. Leave it open, and it will ferment into cider. Add some sugar if you want up the proof.

Seriously though, add apple juice to the fermenter, add yeast, wait 6 moths, drink delicious cider. The only hard part is waiting for it properly age (6 months minimum, 1 year is better). My suggestion would be to make two batches. Drink the first one young and think, "Huh, this pretty good". Lose the second one in the back of a closet for at least a year and think, "Damn, this is good. I am so glad I didn't wait to start a second batch. That Roger guy is a genius."

/I guarantee you will think that
//How many cider makers get their start
 
2012-09-24 11:03:41 PM

WinoRhino: How hard is it, and do I need any special equipment aside from my standard all-grain brewing rig?


None at all. You only need at primary and secondary fermenter. Buy 5 gallons of soft cider. Make sure its UV pasturized and does not contain any chemical preservatives (they're not bad for you, but they are bad for yeast). Add 1 crushed Campden tablet per gallon (or about half a teaspoon per 5-gal) and 1 tablespoon of yeast nutrient per gallon. Wait 24 hours and pitch your yeast (Cider yeast or champagne yeast are traditional, but be experimental, goddamnit. Try dry-hopping your cider for a real goddamn adventure). Carry out fermentation as you would any other batch. If you want to boost the ABV, add whatever sugar source inspires you (but remember that 1 lb of sugar adds quite a bit of volume). If you want to spice it, I recommend making up a spice tea (or spiced vodka infusion) and adding at bottling time because its hard to predict their effects. Anyway, cider is way easier than beer, but just as enjoyable and everyone should try it right now.
 
2012-09-24 11:03:43 PM

WinoRhino: melopene: This year's Summer Ale was much better

Did you hear that they lost their entire final batch of summer ale? That's why pumpkin and oktoberfest hit the scene earlier than usual.


That's a real shame - but exactly what I meant about how they still think like a microbrewery.

Also, the fact that they gave hops to small breweries during the hops shortage makes them a bunch of badasses.
 
2012-09-24 11:03:47 PM

WinoRhino: melopene: This year's Summer Ale was much better

Did you hear that they lost their entire final batch of summer ale? That's why pumpkin and oktoberfest hit the scene earlier than usual.


Try wheat, barly or oats, not punkins they are for pies or chunkin, not beer. Hops are good but not so much. Rice and other stuff will get you high but they don't make good beer, just miller.
 
2012-09-24 11:04:56 PM

melopene: Fark Homebrewer's google group


Never knew about that one!
 
2012-09-24 11:06:26 PM
Seasonal beers are for seasonal drinkers.
 
2012-09-24 11:06:49 PM
NO DEEP ELLUM BREWERY OR RAHR? WHAT MADNESS IS THIS?
 
2012-09-24 11:10:50 PM
Epic's Fermentation without Representation FTW 

blog.hopbunnies.com
 
2012-09-24 11:11:04 PM

mudpants: Seasonal beers are for seasonal drinkers.


What's wrong with drinking seasonally? Just as with food, seasonal brews are often perfect for that time of year.
 
2012-09-24 11:12:18 PM
Would love to try that Ommegang if I can find it. Still need to try the Motorboat.
 
2012-09-24 11:15:35 PM
www.troegs.com
 
2012-09-24 11:15:37 PM

WinoRhino: Skarekrough: Ya gotta look around and make connections. The place I get mine gives me a bulk discount. I picked up 11 gallons for about $50.

One batch has a traditional English Ale yeast working on it. The other has a Belgian Saison. If things go well I may do another two batches in a few weeks.

I did my first batch last year. I let it sit until January and the results were awesome. People were beside themselves about it.

Okay folks, talk to me. I brew a LOT of beer and it would knock my wife out if I could make her homemade cider (her preferred booze over beer.) How hard is it, and do I need any special equipment aside from my standard all-grain brewing rig?


Pour non-chemically pastuerized cider into carboy
Add yeast
Wait a few months
Add Campden tablets to kill yeast
Transfer to keg and sweeten with sugar dissolved in boiling water to bring FG up to 0.010 or so.
Put CO2 to keg to carb it up

And that's about it. The taste differences are going to be in the yeast and what you use to sweeten it (sugar, honey, brown sugar).

Cider is so easy I almost feel guilty about making it.
 
2012-09-24 11:17:13 PM

Satyagraha: /without a Leinie in the mix, all you got is less


Drinkin' one of those right now. Very good.
 
2012-09-24 11:18:55 PM

melopene: mudpants: Seasonal beers are for seasonal drinkers.

What's wrong with drinking seasonally? Just as with food, seasonal brews are often perfect for that time of year.


I see what you are thinking, pumkins in fall, pinetrees in winter, roses in springtime. But what if I just want beer that tases like beer, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 and some odd number a year? I enjoy beer that tasets like beer. I want milk that tastes like milk and chicken that tastes like chicken. I want them all in every season. And I would like beery beer year round. I enjoy Christmas in july, I enjoy turkey on days that aren't thanks givins. Oh, and I like beer that tastes like ... beer!
 
2012-09-24 11:21:51 PM

Dr. Manhattan: Skarekrough: People were beside themselves about it.

I've had a similar general experience which leads me to believe my friends are either genuinely impressed with my cidering prowess or are such good liars that they shouldn't be dealing with the likes of me. Either way, I was able to use my cider stock as currency to avoid starvation during last year's late September/early October Snowpocalypse. Anyway, you are correct that now is the time to make contacts. I've got a few leads on where to get "the good stuff" from. We'll see how it plays out.


Despite others raves about mine I just wasn't a huge fan of it. Then again I do tend to prefer Irish Ciders like Magner's and Strongbow. MIne was much more like Harpoon CIder, which makes sense because the apples are from that area.

My side-gig involves fly fishing and over the Winter I brought a gallon of it to a trade show and doled it out to the fly tiers in the booth next to us. They raved about it and as a result it ended up being currency for tying materials, being taught a few patterns and gave the company a serious edge over other vendors.

Next year I was asked by the owner to have a keg ready for each of the two shows I do. He's having cups printed up with the company logo.
 
2012-09-24 11:21:56 PM

mudpants: And I would like beery beer year round. I enjoy Christmas in july, I enjoy turkey on days that aren't thanks givins. Oh, and I like beer that tastes like ... beer!


You should try a coffee snob thread....
 
2012-09-24 11:23:06 PM
I've given up on these lists...my flyover area of the country gets continually ignored as we brew some of the best beers around. Oh well...more for me.
 
2012-09-24 11:23:18 PM

Skarekrough: WinoRhino: Skarekrough: Ya gotta look around and make connections. The place I get mine gives me a bulk discount. I picked up 11 gallons for about $50.

One batch has a traditional English Ale yeast working on it. The other has a Belgian Saison. If things go well I may do another two batches in a few weeks.

I did my first batch last year. I let it sit until January and the results were awesome. People were beside themselves about it.

Okay folks, talk to me. I brew a LOT of beer and it would knock my wife out if I could make her homemade cider (her preferred booze over beer.) How hard is it, and do I need any special equipment aside from my standard all-grain brewing rig?

Pour non-chemically pastuerized cider into carboy
Add yeast
Wait a few months
Add Campden tablets to kill yeast
Transfer to keg and sweeten with sugar dissolved in boiling water to bring FG up to 0.010 or so.
Put CO2 to keg to carb it up

And that's about it. The taste differences are going to be in the yeast and what you use to sweeten it (sugar, honey, brown sugar).

Cider is so easy I almost feel guilty about making it.


Don't listen to this trash, sweet cider is the devil. You can always sweeten up your cider later on with a dash of Sprite, but you can't unsweetened it. Start dry, work up from there if you really don't like it.

/Team Dry Cider
 
2012-09-24 11:24:42 PM

mudpants: melopene: mudpants: Seasonal beers are for seasonal drinkers.

What's wrong with drinking seasonally? Just as with food, seasonal brews are often perfect for that time of year.

I see what you are thinking, pumkins in fall, pinetrees in winter, roses in springtime. But what if I just want beer that tases like beer, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 and some odd number a year? I enjoy beer that tasets like beer. I want milk that tastes like milk and chicken that tastes like chicken. I want them all in every season. And I would like beery beer year round. I enjoy Christmas in july, I enjoy turkey on days that aren't thanks givins. Oh, and I like beer that tastes like ... beer!


Ah, but all beers taste like beer - it's just the style and the additions. Go ahead, enjoy your various stouts, porters, ales, lambics, wheats, etc., but don't knock those of us who appreciate seasonal ingredients and flavors.
 
2012-09-24 11:25:08 PM

nopokerface: mudpants: And I would like beery beer year round. I enjoy Christmas in july, I enjoy turkey on days that aren't thanks givins. Oh, and I like beer that tastes like ... beer!

You should try a coffee snob thread....


are there instant coffee threads?
 
2012-09-24 11:26:12 PM

mudpants: are there instant coffee threads?


No, you have to wait until they go green.
 
2012-09-24 11:29:53 PM

melopene: mudpants: melopene: mudpants: Seasonal beers are for seasonal drinkers.

What's wrong with drinking seasonally? Just as with food, seasonal brews are often perfect for that time of year.

I see what you are thinking, pumkins in fall, pinetrees in winter, roses in springtime. But what if I just want beer that tases like beer, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 and some odd number a year? I enjoy beer that tasets like beer. I want milk that tastes like milk and chicken that tastes like chicken. I want them all in every season. And I would like beery beer year round. I enjoy Christmas in july, I enjoy turkey on days that aren't thanks givins. Oh, and I like beer that tastes like ... beer!

Ah, but all beers taste like beer - it's just the style and the additions. Go ahead, enjoy your various stouts, porters, ales, lambics, wheats, etc., but don't knock those of us who appreciate seasonal ingredients and flavors.


The things that don't make it beer? I like a few black and tan, I prefere stouts but the dang flavored stuff isn't very good. It's like making bacon out of turkey. It is just WRONG !
no juniper in beer, no lime, arrrrggg, it is wrong!
 
2012-09-24 11:32:00 PM

mudpants: The things that don't make it beer? I like a few black and tan, I prefere stouts but the dang flavored stuff isn't very good. It's like making bacon out of turkey. It is just WRONG !
no juniper in beer, no lime, arrrrggg, it is wrong!


So you stick to the old-school definition, that's fine. Some of us like to be adventurous. It's the spice of life!
 
2012-09-24 11:33:39 PM

Satyagraha: [encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 214x235]
/without a Leinie in the mix, all you got is less


I couldn't agree more.

I'm more of a whiskey/rye fan, but when I drink beer it's usually Leinenkugel's. If I want a local beer, I'll drink Nimbus.
 
2012-09-24 11:34:00 PM

melopene: mudpants: The things that don't make it beer? I like a few black and tan, I prefere stouts but the dang flavored stuff isn't very good. It's like making bacon out of turkey. It is just WRONG !
no juniper in beer, no lime, arrrrggg, it is wrong!

So you stick to the old-school definition, that's fine. Some of us like to be adventurous. It's the spice of life!


If you stick to the old-old-school definition, all of those "things that don't make beer" are actually what make beer. We've only been using hops for a few hundred years, all of that other stuff has been in there for thousands of years.
 
2012-09-24 11:38:27 PM

RogermcAllen: Skarekrough: WinoRhino: Skarekrough: Ya gotta look around and make connections. The place I get mine gives me a bulk discount. I picked up 11 gallons for about $50.

One batch has a traditional English Ale yeast working on it. The other has a Belgian Saison. If things go well I may do another two batches in a few weeks.

I did my first batch last year. I let it sit until January and the results were awesome. People were beside themselves about it.

Okay folks, talk to me. I brew a LOT of beer and it would knock my wife out if I could make her homemade cider (her preferred booze over beer.) How hard is it, and do I need any special equipment aside from my standard all-grain brewing rig?

Pour non-chemically pastuerized cider into carboy
Add yeast
Wait a few months
Add Campden tablets to kill yeast
Transfer to keg and sweeten with sugar dissolved in boiling water to bring FG up to 0.010 or so.
Put CO2 to keg to carb it up

And that's about it. The taste differences are going to be in the yeast and what you use to sweeten it (sugar, honey, brown sugar).

Cider is so easy I almost feel guilty about making it.

Don't listen to this trash, sweet cider is the devil. You can always sweeten up your cider later on with a dash of Sprite, but you can't unsweetened it. Start dry, work up from there if you really don't like it.

/Team Dry Cider


Dry Cider is for people who hate themselves and feel the need to punish themselves for no good reason.

Actually I did a gallon experiment last year of dry cider and handed off to a buddy who enjoyed it thoroughly.
 
2012-09-24 11:42:40 PM

melopene: mudpants: The things that don't make it beer? I like a few black and tan, I prefere stouts but the dang flavored stuff isn't very good. It's like making bacon out of turkey. It is just WRONG !
no juniper in beer, no lime, arrrrggg, it is wrong!

So you stick to the old-school definition, that's fine. Some of us like to be adventurous. It's the spice of life!


I drink beer like water. I have adventure for adventure. Some of you like to be pretentious. And spelling nazis!

Let's trade moonshine
 
2012-09-24 11:45:44 PM
i115.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-24 11:48:12 PM

melopene: mudpants: The things that don't make it beer? I like a few black and tan, I prefere stouts but the dang flavored stuff isn't very good. It's like making bacon out of turkey. It is just WRONG !
no juniper in beer, no lime, arrrrggg, it is wrong!

So you stick to the old-school definition, that's fine. Some of us like to be adventurous. It's the spice of life!


I have an adventurous friend who would play frank zappa for weeks if I didn't smack him in the jewels. He is so creative he is predictable. All creative and individual and that makes it all look just alike. What are you wearing now? I have a neice that plays cello.
 
2012-09-25 12:02:23 AM
Anyone tried a Bob's 47 from Boulevard yet? I remember back in the day when Boulevard sucked (very early 90s), and then while I was away from KC, they figured out how to make some really kickass beer.

Weyerbacher sounds interesting. CO has a great selection, but we definitely miss out on the regional gems as well.
 
2012-09-25 12:06:09 AM
farm9.staticflickr.com

/Found in their Autumn Sampler
//Tastes like coffee
 
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