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(Spiegel)   Are the internet really making us dumber?   (spiegel.de) divider line 201
    More: Obvious, Winnie-the-Pooh, Mensa, national capitals  
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6920 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Sep 2012 at 4:51 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-24 05:00:11 PM

Macinfarker: IT'S MORE DUMBER YOU STUPID


ITS ITS NOT IT'S YOU SO DUMBER
 
2012-09-24 05:00:52 PM

bdub77: downstairs: Its making us have to remember less, which to me isn't the most important component of "intellegence".
 
I don't have to know the dates of the Iran/Iraq war.  But I still have to use my own brain and experiences to give a (hopefully) intellegent opinion of how it may be affecting current events.
 
For those that use the internet to form their opinions, they were dumb to begin with.

I think its impirative to know the dates of wars we started with other counties, like Iran and Afganistan.

The internet thus insures we have a base of knowledge under which we can make diffecult choices. Whether those choices are the correct ones remains to be seen. I am pretty confidant that well come out a better nation, i.e. Canada or Great Britin. The wholistic question is whether the policys institued by that nations is the right or wrong ones. The internet helps us form opinions that are good in the sense of the increase in logic which America can use. To quote Jefferson, you cant stop good looking man from achieving stuff; people with bad attitudes are like horses and cannot be stopped.


Oh god, please make it stop. Make it stoooooooooop.
 
2012-09-24 05:01:15 PM
It makes me care less about stuff and things, which is dumber
 
2012-09-24 05:02:05 PM
IT has made us lazier in search of things. And lots of times people will take anything as fact just because its on the internet. I have a paranoid relative out west and he is a birther, derper and just all around weirdo. Im too scared to look at his "blog"
 
2012-09-24 05:02:43 PM
Impossible to answer. Try finding a civilized society that doesn't have the toobs? Or you wanna be the sample set that has to go for years without the nets? I sure as hell don't.
 
2012-09-24 05:03:08 PM

ISO15693: namatad: Vernor Vinge

Verno Vinge said "Within thirty years, we will have the technological means to create superhuman intelligence. Shortly after, the human era will be ended."

In 1993.

That only gives us 11 years, tops.


He also tossed in the caveat that war/disruption could slow that progress down. 9/11 and the great recession probably added a few years to that. BUT ...
 
2012-09-24 05:03:24 PM
Subby: Are the internet really making us dumber  dummer?

Fixed you're typoe for you
 
2012-09-24 05:03:36 PM

meat0918: People can be pretty smart, given the proper encouragement and access to education. Humans did manage to put a farking man on the moon as well as land several craft on another planet.


Yes, but that was all done by the kids that the other kids picked on for being nerds.
 
2012-09-24 05:04:26 PM
namatad

It is sad that there are still birthers out there. Those vile and despicable people that have at least half a brain and can use the internet to figure out the difference between color and b&w scanning, while the rest of the world is in denial and sticking their heads in sand.

You would think that with all the money Obama spent trying to suppress everything he would have had someone that at least had half a brain with regards to photoshop/illustrator. I guess the joke is on the american people because they bought it hook line and sinker.

not that i expect any sheeple to click on the link below:
http://www.wnd.com/2011/10/356005/

But obviously people that have never bothered to look at the material in question would know better than someone who has looked at it. After all the media and the government are beyond reproach.

I double checked my freezer, still no wads of cash inside....
 
2012-09-24 05:04:52 PM

CruiserTwelve: namatad: I learned today the Dewey was ahead of Truman by a huge amount at this point in the 1948 election. I will never remember the EXACT amount, but dewey had a gigantic lead, and still lost.

Dewey lost? Yeah, right. Next you'll try to convince me that Bush beat Gore...


Not really. Bush might be an R, but Gore is generally PG-13.
 
2012-09-24 05:05:34 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: It's bringing a lot of Englandish English to the masses which makes people who try to copy it sound dumber.

For example:
"I got a C in maths." - Incorrect contraction of 'mathematics'.

"Intel are releasing a new chip." - Incorrect subject/verb agreement.

"Come take a butcher." - Not even really English.


What pronoun would you use in American English in place of Intel in the second example?
 
2012-09-24 05:06:45 PM

doyner: It isn't making us dumber, it's increasing our exposure to dumb people.


Yes, this.
 
2012-09-24 05:08:27 PM
images.t-nation.com
 
2012-09-24 05:08:57 PM
Unless there are major medical breakthroughs, look for dementia and Alzheimers to go through the roof in the coming decades. Memory exercises which create new pathways in the brain and fight such conditions are becoming less important (and thus less exercised) in normal daily life...just remember I told you first...ah, screw it, you won't be able to remember anyway.
 
2012-09-24 05:09:21 PM

ProfessorOhki: What pronoun would you use in American English in place of Intel in the second example?


"is". It's singular; Intel is a single company or entity in the context of that sentence.
 
2012-09-24 05:10:13 PM
I HAD an IQ of 172 at one point. NOW thanks to the internet I HAVE a huge addiction to porn and only around 150 IQ.

Yes the Internet is dumbing me maker.
 
2012-09-24 05:12:57 PM
I have talked to people who were adamant that there was no gravity on the moon, and that stars are reflecting light from the sun.

According to tests I have an IQ of around 140. I am dumb as shiat. I can't imagine what it's like to be average.
 
2012-09-24 05:13:19 PM
I don't know the exact consequence of internet usage on our intelligence. I'm pretty sure we had plenty of dumb farkers running around before the internet, but they were busy throwing jarts at each other.

I would like to propose that there should be a simple 5 question grammar test before you are allowed access to any website not geared towards small children. Maybe if some people spent more time on education sites learning about verb-noun agreement I would be less interested in tracking them down to club them with their own keyboard.
 
2012-09-24 05:13:49 PM
While the knowledge base for random human has expanded, so has the amount of flow of Information. There is only so much information a human brain can process at a time. Since new information which contradicts old information can be painful, due to processing, does that lend to people searching out sources which only reinforce the already stored information?
 
2012-09-24 05:15:08 PM

LaraAmber: I don't know the exact consequence of internet usage on our intelligence. I'm pretty sure we had plenty of dumb farkers running around before the internet, but they were busy throwing jarts at each other.

I would like to propose that there should be a simple 5 question grammar test before you are allowed access to any website not geared towards small children. Maybe if some people spent more time on education sites learning about verb-noun agreement I would be less interested in tracking them down to club them with their own keyboard.


You almost a good point.
 
2012-09-24 05:16:22 PM

LaraAmber: I don't know the exact consequence of internet usage on our intelligence. I'm pretty sure we had plenty of dumb farkers running around before the internet, but they were busy throwing jarts at each other.

I would like to propose that there should be a simple 5 question grammar test before you are allowed access to any website not geared towards small children. Maybe if some people spent more time on education sites learning about verb-noun agreement I would be less interested in tracking them down to club them with their own keyboard.


You sound average
 
2012-09-24 05:18:22 PM

Gawdzila: ProfessorOhki: What pronoun would you use in American English in place of Intel in the second example?

"is". It's singular; Intel is a single company or entity in the context of that sentence.


Gawdzila is right.

The pronoun is It. It's not a She, He, or an They.

A common mistake people make is taking a word conjures a group in the mind and thinking it is plural.

"Staff" is singular. "Staff members" is plural.
 
2012-09-24 05:21:11 PM
well, given XKCD's proximity to cats graph, and the fact that the internet is full of cats, it may be true.

imgs.xkcd.com
 
2012-09-24 05:23:32 PM

Gawdzila: ProfessorOhki: What pronoun would you use in American English in place of Intel in the second example?

"is". It's singular; Intel is a single company or entity in the context of that sentence.


"Is" isn't a pronoun. I mean would you say "they are releasing a new chip" or "it is releasing a new chip." The way we talk about companies in American English is a bit inconsistent. Not to mention it's not uncommon to see wording like, "Over at Intel, they're working on a new chip." Sure, the "they" in that sentence is implied to be individuals at (well, associated with. You can't really be 'at' a fictitious entity) Intel, but it does sort of throw off what you're used to hearing.

As for the rest of this conversation, IMHO, intelligence is your ability to parse data and form conclusions. Doesn't really matter if that's coming from memory or being referenced constantly. In computing terms, I'd compare it to the efficiency of the individual's learning algorithm; how well trained and adaptable the neural net is. Not so much how many training values it keeps around.

Knowledge - data
Intelligence - data processing
Wisdom - knowing which process needs to be used

Though, I do think the Internet is reducing the depth in which we remember things.
 
2012-09-24 05:27:17 PM

LaraAmber: Gawdzila: ProfessorOhki: What pronoun would you use in American English in place of Intel in the second example?

"is". It's singular; Intel is a single company or entity in the context of that sentence.

Gawdzila is right.

The pronoun is It. It's not a She, He, or an They.

A common mistake people make is taking a word conjures a group in the mind and thinking it is plural.

"Staff" is singular. "Staff members" is plural.


I agree it's correct, I'm just saying that's it's not surprising they are differences in common usage. Like the way "The Smiths" and "The Smith Family" have identical meaning, but one is plural and one is singular.
 
2012-09-24 05:27:54 PM

LaraAmber: Gawdzila: ProfessorOhki: What pronoun would you use in American English in place of Intel in the second example?

"is". It's singular; Intel is a single company or entity in the context of that sentence.

Gawdzila is right.

The pronoun is It. It's not a She, He, or an They.

A common mistake people make is taking a word conjures a group in the mind and thinking it is plural.

"Staff" is singular. "Staff members" is plural.


That's one thing I really like about American English. Noun aggregation allows for another layer of detail in speech while facilitating greater economy of language. It also helps to separate proper from improper pronouns.

American Airlines is shiatty.
American airlines are generally shiatty.
 
2012-09-24 05:29:05 PM
The astonishing upward trend in IQ levels is known as the "Flynn effect," named after
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-09-24 05:29:17 PM

ProfessorOhki:
"Is" isn't a pronoun. I mean would you say "they are releasing a new chip" or "it is releasing a new chip." The way we talk about companies in American English is a bit inconsistent. Not to mention it's not uncommon to see wording like, "Over at Intel, they're working on a new chip." Sure, the "they" in that sentence is implied to be individuals at (well, associated with. You can't really be 'at' a fictitious entity) Intel, but it does sort of throw off what you're used to hearing.


I would argue that when someone writes/says "over at Intel" they are referring to a location, in this instance, an undisclosed R&D campus.

If someone said "over at Wendy's they are offering a free small frosty with a meal purchase today" it is assumed that the listener would understand that the speaker meant the restaurant locations, not the shipping warehouses or corporate offices.
 
2012-09-24 05:30:46 PM
i.imgur.com 

YES.
 
2012-09-24 05:31:16 PM

LaraAmber: ProfessorOhki:
"Is" isn't a pronoun. I mean would you say "they are releasing a new chip" or "it is releasing a new chip." The way we talk about companies in American English is a bit inconsistent. Not to mention it's not uncommon to see wording like, "Over at Intel, they're working on a new chip." Sure, the "they" in that sentence is implied to be individuals at (well, associated with. You can't really be 'at' a fictitious entity) Intel, but it does sort of throw off what you're used to hearing.


I would argue that when someone writes/says "over at Intel" they are he/she is referring to a location, in this instance, an undisclosed R&D campus.

If someone said "over at Wendy's they are offering a free small frosty with a meal purchase today" it is assumed that the listener would understand that the speaker meant the restaurant locations, not the shipping warehouses or corporate offices.


I need more coffee.
 
2012-09-24 05:31:19 PM
I would think that it's a subjective comparison at best. Yes, the internet has consistent grammatical and punctuation errors, but the intent can be construed for the sake of cohesion. Forgetting an apostrophe or using the incorrect variant of "your"/"you're" is not an issue, as the internet IS populated by social introverts typing at 90 words per minute. Sometimes, sh** does happen.

I'm more offended at the inability to put together a reasonable thought and argue it like a sane person, but Fark has spoiled me in that regard.
 
2012-09-24 05:31:50 PM

make me some tea: Also it's stupid easy to find technical tutorials for just about anything.


Once it occurred to me that Youtube probably has firearm teardowns (and I was right) working on my guns got a hell of a lot easier. No more searching for step-by-step instructions (assuming they exist and the manufacturer doesn't just stop at exploded parts views), just hit play.

/It's also handy to figure out which parts not to touch. I've never had a written guide tell me "Ok, you can take this apart, but don't because you'll spend an hour looking for the spring, and another two getting it back in".
 
2012-09-24 05:32:46 PM
Idiocracy, anyone?
 
2012-09-24 05:32:52 PM
Refusing to teach Civics is damn sure contributing to the Epic Stupidity

sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2012-09-24 05:34:35 PM

namatad: downstairs: Its making us have to remember less, which to me isn't the most important component of "intellegence".

But that is only partially true. By giving us access to more information, we also "know" more things.
I learned today the Dewey was ahead of Truman by a huge amount at this point in the 1948 election. I will never remember the EXACT amount, but dewey had a gigantic lead, and still lost.

I will remember this factoid for a very long time and can get the exact number whenever I need it.
So we might be remembering more things at a surface level, which is a huge improvement in "intelligence."

On the other hand, the median IQ is still 100. What percentage are still birthers? still think obama is a muslim? still think 9/11 was a jewish conspiracy??

No amount of knowledge can make up for low IQ. shudder


Interestingly, while it's still 100, the performance needed to get 100 is quite different. Human IQ has been going up for some time now: it's called the Flynn effect, and why it's occurring (and if it's peaked in most first world countries) is still quite controversial. The average score in 1932 was be a 100, just like today since 100 is defined as the average score, but someone scoring a 100 in 1932 would get something like an 80 today.

We be smarter than those dumb old people.
 
2012-09-24 05:34:44 PM

LeroyBourne: Impossible to answer. Try finding a civilized society that doesn't have the toobs? Or you wanna be the sample set that has to go for years without the nets? I sure as hell don't.


Sorry, did you say "civilized"? Do you mean that in the actual sense of the word, meaning an organized body of people who behave with civility, or do you mean the colloquial definition, which amounts to simply being technologically advanced? If the latter, then your definition is self-referential...technologically advanced societies have the 'net. If the former, you should be aware that it is greatly debated whether there are many societies which qualify for the term civilized anymore.

The whole argument subby puts forth is going to boil down to corellation/causation anyway, so it is obviously not the right question to ask. The right question to ask might be something along these lines:

Can the internet contribute to the intellectual development of people under the age of 18? If so, under what circumstances?
Can the internet contribute to the intellectual regression of a normal human adult? If so, under what circumstances?

We have always had stupid people, and we always will. But it is an important thing to know if the internet is keeping people who would otherwise be intelligent from being so.

/They don't think it be like it is, but it do.
 
2012-09-24 05:35:54 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I would think that it's a subjective comparison at best. Yes, the internet has consistent grammatical and punctuation errors, but the intent can be construed for the sake of cohesion. Forgetting an apostrophe or using the incorrect variant of "your"/"you're" is not an issue, as the internet IS populated by social introverts typing at 90 words per minute. Sometimes, sh** does happen.


I'm pretty forgiving of spelling errors in casual conversation, but I start to suspect more than a few errors when someone is trying to make some sort of argument. Damn near any browser will spell check your comment, and if you can't be bothered to fix the squiggly red lines why should I assume you care about your argument?
 
2012-09-24 05:35:55 PM
 
2012-09-24 05:36:31 PM

LaraAmber: ProfessorOhki:
"Is" isn't a pronoun. I mean would you say "they are releasing a new chip" or "it is releasing a new chip." The way we talk about companies in American English is a bit inconsistent. Not to mention it's not uncommon to see wording like, "Over at Intel, they're working on a new chip." Sure, the "they" in that sentence is implied to be individuals at (well, associated with. You can't really be 'at' a fictitious entity) Intel, but it does sort of throw off what you're used to hearing.


I would argue that when someone writes/says "over at Intel" they are referring to a location, in this instance, an undisclosed R&D campus.

If someone said "over at Wendy's they are offering a free small frosty with a meal purchase today" it is assumed that the listener would understand that the speaker meant the restaurant locations, not the shipping warehouses or corporate offices.


That's the thing about corporations though, the parties working on a given thing can be geographically distributed in any manner. If I say, "at Google, engineers enjoy free food," which office do you assume I'm talking about? The grammar surrounding virtual entities is odd.

doyner: That's one thing I really like about American English. Noun aggregation allows for another layer of detail in speech while facilitating greater economy of language. It also helps to separate proper from improper pronouns.

American Airlines is shiatty.
American airlines are generally shiatty


Hard to argue with that though; it is pretty useful.
 
2012-09-24 05:37:00 PM

Noticeably F.A.T.: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I would think that it's a subjective comparison at best. Yes, the internet has consistent grammatical and punctuation errors, but the intent can be construed for the sake of cohesion. Forgetting an apostrophe or using the incorrect variant of "your"/"you're" is not an issue, as the internet IS populated by social introverts typing at 90 words per minute. Sometimes, sh** does happen.

I'm pretty forgiving of spelling errors in casual conversation, but I start to suspect more than a few errors when someone is trying to make some sort of argument. Damn near any browser will spell check your comment, and if you can't be bothered to fix the squiggly red lines why should I assume you care about your argument?


Now if Chrome could only check grammar....
 
2012-09-24 05:39:49 PM
"If I conduct an IQ test and ask a shepherd, 'What connects a lion and a lamb?' he might say, 'The lion eats the lamb,'" Flynn says. "The correct answer on the test, though, is: 'Both are mammals.'"

Depends on the test. WISC4 has done impressively well removing the focus on language and academic behaviors, and the majority of IQ tests tend to separate out intelligence by task type. One does not need to score well in any language section to have a high IQ.
 
2012-09-24 05:40:23 PM

Noticeably F.A.T.: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I would think that it's a subjective comparison at best. Yes, the internet has consistent grammatical and punctuation errors, but the intent can be construed for the sake of cohesion. Forgetting an apostrophe or using the incorrect variant of "your"/"you're" is not an issue, as the internet IS populated by social introverts typing at 90 words per minute. Sometimes, sh** does happen.

I'm pretty forgiving of spelling errors in casual conversation, but I start to suspect more than a few errors when someone is trying to make some sort of argument. Damn near any browser will spell check your comment, and if you can't be bothered to fix the squiggly red lines why should I assume you care about your argument?



THIS


People who can't be bothered to proofread their message before hitting "post/send" damn well aren't worth my time. I can usually tell the "English is my second language" crowd from "I'm a dumb ignorant fark who thinks people with degrees are 'elitist'."
 
2012-09-24 05:42:09 PM

Vangor: "If I conduct an IQ test and ask a shepherd, 'What connects a lion and a lamb?' he might say, 'The lion eats the lamb,'" Flynn says. "The correct answer on the test, though, is: 'Both are mammals.'"

Depends on the test. WISC4 has done impressively well removing the focus on language and academic behaviors, and the majority of IQ tests tend to separate out intelligence by task type. One does not need to score well in any language section to have a high IQ.


The lamb is a herbivore, the lion is a mamnibal.
 
2012-09-24 05:43:42 PM
before the internet stupidity was passed person to person now it can travel at (or near) the speed of light
 
2012-09-24 05:44:21 PM
Inconceivable!
 
2012-09-24 05:44:57 PM
i just read this quote on facebook re: bill maher: hes retared 

/smh
 
2012-09-24 05:45:01 PM

ProfessorOhki:

That's the thing about corporations though, the parties working on a given thing can be geographically distributed in any manner. If I say, "at Google, engineers enjoy free food," which office do you assume I'm talking about? The grammar surrounding virtual entities is odd.


I would assume the main campus or larger facilities. I definitely wouldn't think they are sending catering trucks to people's homes who telecommute. It's not really a failing of English, but the assumption of the speaker that he/she can skip words and you will fill them in. In this case "at Google's main campus".
 
2012-09-24 05:45:12 PM
Yes. The internet makes you stupid.

It exposes you to more things, but makes you think less because anything you can think of is instantly available to you.
 
2012-09-24 05:47:04 PM
Nes Yo   
 
2012-09-24 05:47:35 PM

ProfessorOhki: "Is" isn't a pronoun. I mean would you say "they are releasing a new chip" or "it is releasing a new chip."


Haha, sorry, read "pronoun" and went ahead and just corrected the verb anyway. Duh. Anyway, if you use the name "Intel" you're treating it as a singular entity, thus I'd still say that "it" is the correct pronoun and "is" is the correct verb. You're right, though -- we substitute "they" more often than not. But, as you say, it is understood that we're referring to the people who work there -- "the folks at Intel" -- rather than the entity Intel Corp. itself.
 
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