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(Reuters)   World Health Organization finds new SARS-like virus in Britain, says NOBODY PANIC while calmly putting on their containment suits   (reuters.com) divider line 62
    More: Scary, SARS, World Health Organization, Britain, Qatari, virus, respiratory tract infections, air ambulance  
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4431 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Sep 2012 at 10:43 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-24 10:22:23 AM  
I like the apocalyptic Muslim foreshadowing. 2012 ain't over yet!
 
2012-09-24 10:44:39 AM  
Britain? Whew. Viruses can't swim, right?
 
2012-09-24 10:45:21 AM  
Good news - none of the contacts of the two known cases, including healthcare workers, appears to be ill, so maybe it's not spread person to person so easily, or maybe it is rarely severe. Bad news, it seems to be emerging in Saudi Arabia just in time for the hajj...
 
2012-09-24 10:47:46 AM  
Bah, both the great Pig Aids scare of 2010 and the Bird Aids scare of 2009 were overblown hoshposh. One more variety of animal aids won't hurt anyone.
 
2012-09-24 10:48:09 AM  
Oh no, not SARS, anything but that! You catch that and you only have a 98% chance of survival.
 
2012-09-24 10:50:10 AM  
Yeah, the WHO doesn't want people to panic. Good one.
 
2012-09-24 10:51:20 AM  
Hope this dude took a private flight to London from where he had prevously been hospitalized.
 
2012-09-24 10:54:36 AM  
Not Madagascar, right?

/OK whew
 
2012-09-24 10:55:31 AM  

Agarista: Hope this dude took a private flight to London from where he had prevously been hospitalized.



I doubt it, given that it was only identified as potentially sinister and new in London.
 
2012-09-24 10:56:02 AM  
Ooh, I love this movie!
 
2012-09-24 10:56:38 AM  
epidemics surprisingly are not epidemics in nations with sufficient medical care
 
2012-09-24 10:56:42 AM  
Eh, that's okay. When you take out one of those WHO agents in their containment suits, they often drop a bile jar, and those bile jars are hella useful in a pinch.
 
2012-09-24 10:57:11 AM  

Neondistraction: Oh no, not SARS, anything but that! You catch that and you only have a 98% chance of survival.


Unless you're middle-aged, then it's one in six. Or, for the elderly, one in two.
 
2012-09-24 10:58:34 AM  

Flakeloaf: Neondistraction: Oh no, not SARS, anything but that! You catch that and you only have a 98% chance of survival.

Unless you're middle-aged, then it's one in six. Or, for the elderly, one in two.


Why do the middle aged have a much lower chance of survival than the elderly?
 
2012-09-24 10:59:31 AM  
It has begun!

/damn Mayans!
 
2012-09-24 11:03:20 AM  

StubhyGraham: Bah, both the great Pig Aids scare of 2010 and the Bird Aids scare of 2009 were overblown hoshposh. One more variety of animal aids won't hurt anyone.


been there, done that. Called small pox. We got over it. Indeed, we kicked its farkin' ass.

(yeah ok so we inadvertently wiped out most of pre cortesian north and south american populations with it but we didnt know about germs then)
 
2012-09-24 11:03:51 AM  
I'm sure everything will be fine in 28 days.
 
2012-09-24 11:04:20 AM  

dervish16108: Flakeloaf: Neondistraction: Oh no, not SARS, anything but that! You catch that and you only have a 98% chance of survival.

Unless you're middle-aged, then it's one in six. Or, for the elderly, one in two.

Why do the middle aged have a much lower chance of survival than the elderly?


Because I'm an idiot. That's the mortality rate.
 
2012-09-24 11:04:46 AM  
So, basically, two people have been diagnosed with a coronavirus?
 
2012-09-24 11:07:14 AM  

Litig8r: So, basically, two people have been diagnosed with a coronavirus?


Shh, there are truckloads of flu-vaccines which aren't going to sell themselves.
 
2012-09-24 11:07:47 AM  
Cheerio pip pip carry on mind the gap.

I believe that's British for "Everybody Panic!"
 
2012-09-24 11:08:05 AM  

basemetal: It has begun!

/damn Mayans!


Good thing I've prepared.

dl.dropbox.com
 
2012-09-24 11:10:50 AM  
images3.wikia.nocookie.net

Here... we... go!
 
2012-09-24 11:12:21 AM  
Unfortunately it's only a matter of time until some illness pops up that wipes out a significant portion of the population. Mutation rates and population density and fluidity pretty much guarantee it. There will be "small" ones that wipe out 10% of the population, but it's not inconceivable that at some point there will be a big one that wipes out up to 50%. Genetics will determine who lives and who doesn't far more the medical care, so you'll just have to hope you won the genetic lottery if you're around at those times.
 
2012-09-24 11:12:51 AM  
DO NOT PANIC CITIZEN - WE HAVE THE SOLUTION. 

currentconfig.com

www.yourprops.com

YOU ARE NOT A PART OF IT.
 
2012-09-24 11:13:42 AM  
For the dumbasses who insist on criticizing the WHO, the CDC, USPHS and their equivalents around the globe as sensationalist: These organizations have actually done an outstanding job of recognizing new infectious disease threats and taking he correct actions to prevent epidemics. Meet some of the people who work for these organizations and you'll learn for yourselves that they are anything but prone to sensationalism.
 
2012-09-24 11:15:27 AM  
I wouldn't be surprised by a world wide pandemic in the next 20 years. There's 7 billion of us. The 1918 plague killed 50 million people, something like 3% of the worlds population. Extrapolation puts that number at what? 210 million now. It's only a matter of time, and you have to admit. We've never really come up with an effective strategy for fighting viruses and combating cytokine storm.
 
2012-09-24 11:20:53 AM  

Explodo: Unfortunately it's only a matter of time until some illness pops up that wipes out a significant portion of the population. Mutation rates and population density and fluidity pretty much guarantee it. There will be "small" ones that wipe out 10% of the population, but it's not inconceivable that at some point there will be a big one that wipes out up to 50%. Genetics will determine who lives and who doesn't far more the medical care, so you'll just have to hope you won the genetic lottery if you're around at those times.


It is inevitable. We've become too good at flaunting the usual methods of natural selection. Common disease, predation, starvation, etc. We've even managed to minimize the natural selection method unique to our species: war.

The weak are going to be culled in a rather spectacular event. A rapidly evolving disease is the most likely suspect, in my opinion.
 
2012-09-24 11:21:48 AM  

Explodo: Unfortunately it's only a matter of time until some illness pops up that wipes out a significant portion of the population. Mutation rates and population density and fluidity pretty much guarantee it.


Those same things that also increase exposure, also equal more immunity.

The ones which wiped out lots of people in the past hit areas where people had no previous immunity because they never encountered any earlier versions of it before. Now with global travel people are being exposed to everything everywhere.
 
2012-09-24 11:21:50 AM  

indarwinsshadow: I wouldn't be surprised by a world wide pandemic in the next 20 years. There's 7 billion of us. The 1918 plague killed 50 million people, something like 3% of the worlds population. Extrapolation puts that number at what? 210 million now. It's only a matter of time, and you have to admit. We've never really come up with an effective strategy for fighting viruses and combating cytokine storm.


You gotta factor in cheap air travel and the crushing poverty in many regions that are now exposed to new threats.
On the plus side, we have better ability to manufacture vaccines and more doctors know what the fark their dealing with.

If medical science moves fast enough, things like this might happen and never reach a crisis stage.
 
2012-09-24 11:34:05 AM  

way south: basemetal: It has begun!

/damn Mayans!

Good thing I've prepared.

[dl.dropbox.com image 677x410]


This is pretty much my policy, 1000 rounds 5.56 might get a little heavy in my ruck though...
 
2012-09-24 11:38:48 AM  

J. Frank Parnell: Explodo: Unfortunately it's only a matter of time until some illness pops up that wipes out a significant portion of the population. Mutation rates and population density and fluidity pretty much guarantee it.

Those same things that also increase exposure, also equal more immunity.

The ones which wiped out lots of people in the past hit areas where people had no previous immunity because they never encountered any earlier versions of it before. Now with global travel people are being exposed to everything everywhere.


this is why i always lick my fingers after touching the doorknob of a public bathroom. I'm impervious to flu viruses...now if i could just get rid of the herpes:(
 
2012-09-24 11:38:54 AM  

indarwinsshadow: I wouldn't be surprised by a world wide pandemic in the next 20 years. There's 7 billion of us. The 1918 plague killed 50 million people, something like 3% of the worlds population. Extrapolation puts that number at what? 210 million now. It's only a matter of time, and you have to admit. We've never really come up with an effective strategy for fighting viruses and combating cytokine storm.


Funny story about that. There was a drug called TGN1412, which was supposed to help regulate the immune system (aka tell it to ease off a little). Instead it ended up competitively activating every single immune system in the body. Everyone that had it at the trial suffered from cytokine storm and all they could do treatment wise was say sorry here's some life support and blood transfusions. Research shows that anti-oxidants and a few drugs in trial might be able to help, but there's not a helluva lot of concrete data about it.

For people that don't know, cytokines are chemical messengers that your immune system releases to help combat infection. Sometimes, in the case of the 1918 flu for example, they stimulate cells to produce more cytokines, which stimulate the cells to produce even more. Also released are a lot of fun chemicals that work well to fight infection, but are dangerous to your own cells as well...enough of them can cause organ damage and death.
 
2012-09-24 11:41:04 AM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-09-24 11:46:21 AM  

Flakeloaf: Neondistraction: Oh no, not SARS, anything but that! You catch that and you only have a 98% chance of survival.

Unless you're middle-aged, then it's one in six. Or, for the elderly, one in two.


I think you accidentally the backwards.
 
2012-09-24 11:47:50 AM  

indarwinsshadow: I wouldn't be surprised by a world wide pandemic in the next 20 years. There's 7 billion of us. The 1918 plague killed 50 million people, something like 3% of the worlds population. Extrapolation puts that number at what? 210 million now. It's only a matter of time, and you have to admit. We've never really come up with an effective strategy for fighting viruses and combating cytokine storm.


It's actually sort of crazy it really hasn't happened more. Even in the US polio was crippling people 50 years ago. It's stunning how we live in a time of relative peace from disease but we'd be fools to think this is a permanent situation. In the 1990s America was mostly at peace with the world too.
 
2012-09-24 11:53:17 AM  
www.stuffistumbledupon.com
 
2012-09-24 11:55:33 AM  

CarnySaur: [www.stuffistumbledupon.com image 500x708]


Well played sir!
 
2012-09-24 11:58:32 AM  

cgraves67: Explodo: Unfortunately it's only a matter of time until some illness pops up that wipes out a significant portion of the population. Mutation rates and population density and fluidity pretty much guarantee it. There will be "small" ones that wipe out 10% of the population, but it's not inconceivable that at some point there will be a big one that wipes out up to 50%. Genetics will determine who lives and who doesn't far more the medical care, so you'll just have to hope you won the genetic lottery if you're around at those times.

It is inevitable. We've become too good at flaunting the usual methods of natural selection. Common disease, predation, starvation, etc. We've even managed to minimize the natural selection method unique to our species: war.

The weak are going to be culled in a rather spectacular event. A rapidly evolving disease is the most likely suspect, in my opinion.


I tend to agree, with one caveat: the 'weak' means 'weak in Darwinian terms';not necessarily the elderly, for instance.

Iirc, some diseases that turn the immune system against you are actually worse for the healthy...
 
2012-09-24 12:04:42 PM  

Bungles: Agarista: Hope this dude took a private flight to London from where he had prevously been hospitalized.


I doubt it, given that it was only identified as potentially sinister and new in London.


From the much more informative BBC article: "The 49-year-old man, who was transferred to a London hospital by air ambulance from Qatar, is the second person confirmed with the coronavirus."

He's the second case, the first was in Saudi Arabia and he died.

The virus hasn't been found in Britain, it was found in Qatar. Link
 
2012-09-24 12:05:41 PM  

Hrist: indarwinsshadow: I wouldn't be surprised by a world wide pandemic in the next 20 years. There's 7 billion of us. The 1918 plague killed 50 million people, something like 3% of the worlds population. Extrapolation puts that number at what? 210 million now. It's only a matter of time, and you have to admit. We've never really come up with an effective strategy for fighting viruses and combating cytokine storm.

Funny story about that. There was a drug called TGN1412, which was supposed to help regulate the immune system (aka tell it to ease off a little). Instead it ended up competitively activating every single immune system in the body. Everyone that had it at the trial suffered from cytokine storm and all they could do treatment wise was say sorry here's some life support and blood transfusions. Research shows that anti-oxidants and a few drugs in trial might be able to help, but there's not a helluva lot of concrete data about it.

For people that don't know, cytokines are chemical messengers that your immune system releases to help combat infection. Sometimes, in the case of the 1918 flu for example, they stimulate cells to produce more cytokines, which stimulate the cells to produce even more. Also released are a lot of fun chemicals that work well to fight infection, but are dangerous to your own cells as well...enough of them can cause organ damage and death.


Just did some reading, and there's an argument that the second wave of the Spanish flu epidemic had a higher mortality rate from Aspirin poising (Rye's syndrome). And that 20-40 year old's were hit hardest. I guess due to a stronger immune response. We're screwed if another strong H1N series viruses get's mutated just enough to spread quickly without an effective vaccine in place. Someone mentioned cheap air travel. True. This type of virus could spread throughout the world within a matter of days if that were the case. SARS was a good example.
 
2012-09-24 12:06:25 PM  
That's poisoning. Not poising. Damned fingers today.
 
2012-09-24 12:15:51 PM  
toknowhimtoday.com
 
2012-09-24 12:18:46 PM  

PunGent: cgraves67: Explodo: Unfortunately it's only a matter of time until some illness pops up that wipes out a significant portion of the population. Mutation rates and population density and fluidity pretty much guarantee it. There will be "small" ones that wipe out 10% of the population, but it's not inconceivable that at some point there will be a big one that wipes out up to 50%. Genetics will determine who lives and who doesn't far more the medical care, so you'll just have to hope you won the genetic lottery if you're around at those times.

It is inevitable. We've become too good at flaunting the usual methods of natural selection. Common disease, predation, starvation, etc. We've even managed to minimize the natural selection method unique to our species: war.

The weak are going to be culled in a rather spectacular event. A rapidly evolving disease is the most likely suspect, in my opinion.

I tend to agree, with one caveat: the 'weak' means 'weak in Darwinian terms';not necessarily the elderly, for instance.

Iirc, some diseases that turn the immune system against you are actually worse for the healthy...


I would say, not necessarily weak in terms of physical constitution nor immune system health, but rather economically. Wealth can go a long way to offset health problems or to better quarantine yourself from the disease-ridden population. You can afford solutions that others cannot. This is true of both nations and individuals. It is why we are having a battle of health equality in this country. The poor classes around the world are going to be ravaged of some horrible disease sooner or later. In past epidemics, the poor died of ignorance and a lack of resources. The wealthy died only of ignorance. Now that we have a better knowledge of diseases and how to create solutions to them, it's simply a matter of how much resources we can throw at them.
 
2012-09-24 12:35:08 PM  
Explodo: "it's not inconceivable that at some point there will be a big one that wipes out up to 50%"

I think flu-like diseases are unlikely as the vector. Information moves too fast these days and modern infrastructure and sanitation makes infection pretty avoidable once you're paying attention. So you'd need at least a fairly long incubation period to have any chance of becoming wide-spread before being noticed. And I'm not sure how often that coincides with high mortality. You might get to 10% if it starts in areas without all the infrastructure/information though. But 50? Unless it's ridiculously fatal, I don't see how a flu-like would even get 50% *exposure* these days.

We're probably at more risk from mutated STDs. Because even though you *can* avoid farkin, people will still be farkin.
Something with multiple routes to infection, like a super-Herp, could fark some shiat up.
 
2012-09-24 12:35:47 PM  
You sure it's not just nasal congestion after having to breathe in the breath of a Brit? They're not huge on dental hygiene over there...
 
2012-09-24 12:53:20 PM  

biohazard76: Good news - none of the contacts of the two known cases, including healthcare workers, appears to be ill, so maybe it's not spread person to person so easily, or maybe it is rarely severe. Bad news, it seems to be emerging in Saudi Arabia just in time for the hajj...


WHO?

/never gets old

Also, I was thinking of going to hajj this year, so yeah, that is very interesting.
So, yeah, an outbreak where millions of people from around the globe gather in a relatively small area...

Scary.
 
2012-09-24 01:15:50 PM  

Resident Muslim: biohazard76: Good news - none of the contacts of the two known cases, including healthcare workers, appears to be ill, so maybe it's not spread person to person so easily, or maybe it is rarely severe. Bad news, it seems to be emerging in Saudi Arabia just in time for the hajj...

WHO?

/never gets old

Also, I was thinking of going to hajj this year, so yeah, that is very interesting.
So, yeah, an outbreak where millions of people from around the globe gather in a relatively small area...

Scary.


Not to mention (no offense) but many of them will return home to countries that don't have the best public health infrastructure.
 
2012-09-24 01:50:03 PM  
Something, something Captain Tripps

bla bla, zombies.

yadda yadda, apoc-eclipse
 
2012-09-24 02:06:11 PM  
content.internetvideoarchive.com
 
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