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(Telegram)   The modern way to get rid of cat fleas is (a) dipping, (b) topical treatment, or (c) euthanasia?   (telegram.com) divider line 104
    More: Fail, Gardner, topical, insecticides, continuing educations, cats  
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6257 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Sep 2012 at 6:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-23 08:23:48 PM

beakerxf: basemetal: beakerxf: This indicates that someone dropping off healthy animals to be killed is pretty routine at his office.

I'm also bugged when the term "euthanasia" when a healthy animal dies. Euthanasia implies a humane attempt to end suffering. If an animal isn't wanted and you inject it with chemicals to end its life against its will, you've killed it. Stop trying to make it seem like it was an act of kindness.

There was a story in the local news over the spring break about college kids who dumped their pets off at the pound over spring break because kids couldn't afford to board them or find someone to take care of their pets and would rather go party it up. Most never leave the pound again and are euthanized.

When I adopted Izzy, the shelter said he was probably dumped by a college student since he was found just after summer break started. Pretty routine for them to pick up lots of well-fed, docile strays the first or second week of June.


farm4.staticflickr.com

This is my Izzy.
 
2012-09-23 08:25:14 PM
Having taken a pet in for a flea bath and returning after lunch to a corpse Im getting...
No no Im not. It was a horrible experience. :/
 
2012-09-23 08:27:05 PM
Euthanasia should work fine, but it will take a long time to find & euthanise all those fleas.
 
2012-09-23 08:29:30 PM

Gyrfalcon: beakerxf: This indicates that someone dropping off healthy animals to be killed is pretty routine at his office.

I'm also bugged when the term "euthanasia" when a healthy animal dies. Euthanasia implies a humane attempt to end suffering. If an animal isn't wanted and you inject it with chemicals to end its life against its will, you've killed it. Stop trying to make it seem like it was an act of kindness.

Oh, you're one of those who'd rather wait till the animal is in mortal agony, looking at you with those sad awful eyes, begging you to fix what's wrong with it and you can't...than just let it go a little earlier and save it all that pain.

You're f*cked in the head.


You sound guilty.
 
2012-09-23 08:39:16 PM

UsikFark: Shahab: Even though the article goes out of its way to obfuscate this information, the son filled out the paper work incorrectly. He basically signed the cat up for a muderin'

The options are probably listed in alphabetical order, and "Euthanasia" was right above "Flea bath." Then at the bottom was a "Sign to confirm animal euthanasia, no signature required for other procedures." Then "Unmark box to left to indicate you do not wish to participate in compulsory animal euthanasia. [x]"


I'm sure you're snarking. In the event you're not, there may be different paperwork for the two procedures. The vet or a tech would probably come out to talk to you about it. Even the receptionist would confirm that it's the correct procedure if you said "I want to give my cat a flea bath" and checked "Euthanasia" for Fluffy. If it is a case of the son being an incompetent meathead, well that's between him and his family.

/our vet sent us a hand-written sympathy card when our cat was put to sleep last year - he was popular at the vet's (and emergency vet)
//still miss him
 
2012-09-23 08:44:04 PM

vodka: Having your pet "dipped" is medieval idiocy.


How is it any different from bathing the cat though? I had a cat years ago who had some sort of bowel disease (only found the cause out later, but uggh). Basically he tried to get to the litter box, but he wasn't always successful, and it was not easy to clean up, let's put it that way. So baths were frequently necessary.

From what I've read around the 'net, flea shampoo/bath isn't really much different from regular bath... right?
 
2012-09-23 08:45:39 PM
It's Worcester. No matter what the problem, euthanasia should always be on the table.

/no, but seriously, fark this guy
 
2012-09-23 08:57:11 PM

Duck_of_Doom: /our vet sent us a hand-written sympathy card when our cat was put to sleep last year - he was popular at the vet's (and emergency vet)
//still miss him


We got one from our vet and his assistants after we had our cat put to sleep this past Mother's Day (cancer). Tilly was also very popular with vet & his staff.
 
2012-09-23 09:04:17 PM

ladyfortuna: From what I've read around the 'net, flea shampoo/bath isn't really much different from regular bath... right?


A little. They do contain some form of insecticide. If it's decent, it works for a shortish period of time, which is only somewhat effective as there will be a hatch cycle in your house, and inevitably they get re-infected. The continuous protection topicals really are the best bet.

/DON'T get medical advice from the guy at the feed store
//that little oopsie wound up costing over 6k, although I saved all eight of them
 
2012-09-23 09:05:26 PM

Magorn: CSB:
I have a kitty that is hyper-sensitive to fleas, her skin gets scabby anywhere they bite her. After experimentation with every single anti-flea product for cats on the market I found only two that worked:

Frontline which costs $50 for three doses from the vet and on her worked for only two weeks at a time instead of the full month (so I always worried about ODing her)


No need. It's very safe. In bad infestations, I've had owners apply more frequently than labelled.
 
2012-09-23 09:09:29 PM
hum I could see putting the cat in a gas chamber with a mask on and waiting for the fleas to die, save that when mine get fleas most of the time they like to hide out on the neck and around the mouth. Makes it a pain for giving them a bath as well, since the cats are fine till their eyes or ears get into the water.
 
2012-09-23 09:27:24 PM
betcha it didn't kill the fleas either
 
2012-09-23 09:28:10 PM
I have fleas, so I'm really getting a kick out of these replies.
 
2012-09-23 09:28:38 PM
Orange juice will kill fleas on contact. I love using it, just use it like giving a bath. The only downside is picking off all of the flea carcasses.
 
2012-09-23 09:30:20 PM

calm like a bomb: Magorn: CSB:
I have a kitty that is hyper-sensitive to fleas, her skin gets scabby anywhere they bite her. After experimentation with every single anti-flea product for cats on the market I found only two that worked:

Frontline which costs $50 for three doses from the vet and on her worked for only two weeks at a time instead of the full month (so I always worried about ODing her)

No need. It's very safe. In bad infestations, I've had owners apply more frequently than labelled.


Your HOME has fleas, they're just biting your kitty. Product called Petcor is what you want. You can use it on their fur, bedding, carpet around the bed and etc... Its about $13.00 per bottle and is an Insect Growth Regulator of the same family as precor - which I use to knock fleas out of a house and lawn for up to seven months at a time.

Use a flea-bath material, then the Frontline then follow up 24 hours later with the Petcor (and precor around the house if you can get it).
 
2012-09-23 09:47:48 PM
it's only a cat.....
 
2012-09-23 09:51:32 PM

Bathia_Mapes: Duck_of_Doom: /our vet sent us a hand-written sympathy card when our cat was put to sleep last year - he was popular at the vet's (and emergency vet)
//still miss him

We got one from our vet and his assistants after we had our cat put to sleep this past Mother's Day (cancer). Tilly was also very popular with vet & his staff.


Our cat hates the vet and is one of the few who can manage to work free and actually manage to successfully attack her (and frequently gets the assistant, too). Of course, the vet gets a laugh out of it, and is happy to see her so active at her age (16, getting up there). The dog is quite popular though- she's incredibly social, and loves going to the vet. We board here fairly regularly (we refer to it as camp), which we would never have done with our old dog, who would fight to stay away from the vet and would literally quiver once there. She comes back very happy and very tired.
 
2012-09-23 09:53:21 PM

30yrs2l8: it's only a cat.....


Actually, it's only a vet.

So, how do they euthanize a vet in that town anyway?
 
2012-09-23 09:54:47 PM

prjindigo: Petcor


Yeah, pyrethrins. Have fun with that.
 
2012-09-23 10:05:31 PM

basemetal: beakerxf: basemetal: beakerxf: This indicates that someone dropping off healthy animals to be killed is pretty routine at his office.

I'm also bugged when the term "euthanasia" when a healthy animal dies. Euthanasia implies a humane attempt to end suffering. If an animal isn't wanted and you inject it with chemicals to end its life against its will, you've killed it. Stop trying to make it seem like it was an act of kindness.

There was a story in the local news over the spring break about college kids who dumped their pets off at the pound over spring break because kids couldn't afford to board them or find someone to take care of their pets and would rather go party it up. Most never leave the pound again and are euthanized.

When I adopted Izzy, the shelter said he was probably dumped by a college student since he was found just after summer break started. Pretty routine for them to pick up lots of well-fed, docile strays the first or second week of June.



This is my Izzy.


I have a black cat named Izzy too. Her brother's name is Duff.
 
2012-09-23 10:09:00 PM
There are many ways to euthanize a vet, but by far the best is the car fire. It is the approved method in over 50 states.
 
2012-09-23 10:10:23 PM
Boric Acid crystals.
Not poisonous as used.
This is the SAME as the NO FLEAS FOR A YEAR.

Put some in the cats sleep area. Lightly dust the carpets with it and stomp in with a broom.

Dust mask.

It stays good for years. The physical shape of the crystal cuts the fleas as they ingest it. They eat the stuff like candy. It takes about 2 days before there are zero fleas inside the house. No more being jumped in the mornings.
The crystals just fall into the carpet where the cat fleas live and reproduce. The emerging baby fleas will also find the Boric Acid and eat the tiny crystals. Boom - dead from internal hemorrhage fluid loss.

My flea guy said this was what he used. I went to ask my lady Veterinarian. She agreed.
We had a fles infestation in the yard and house from the cat fleas on our Dobermans.
It took 2 days. Did the outside pen. Dogs backs. And house.

We'd wasted a million bug bombs on this. Now, Flea free.
Eventually we noticed no tiny roaches. None. It turns out all 6 legged insects like to eat the stuff.
 
2012-09-23 10:13:51 PM

Magorn: CSB:
I have a kitty that is hyper-sensitive to fleas, her skin gets scabby anywhere they bite her. After experimentation with every single anti-flea product for cats on the market I found only two that worked:

Frontline which costs $50 for three doses from the vet and on her worked for only two weeks at a time instead of the full month (so I always worried about ODing her)

and the stuff i least expected to work: The "nature's guardian" drops that claim as active ingredients no chemicals and all plant oils:
Active Ingredients:
Peppermint oil...........................3.00%
Cinnamon oil.............................4.50%
Lemon grass oil.......................4.50%
Clove oil.....................................5.00%
Thyme oil...................................5.00%


Stuff works like a farking champ (it "stinks" to high heaven- I like the smell but you can smell you cat coming from 100 yards when you first apply it), last for $30 days, ad you can now buy single dose packages of it at Dollar Tree


I have a sensitive kitty too, but Frontline from my vet is $10.00 a month dosage, and it works well on him for the prescribed time. I only have to use it for a bit on spring / fall. Well, that an a new place (for us) with wood floors helps as well :p

Good info for anyone else with a sensitive cat though, Thanks!
 
2012-09-23 10:14:36 PM
I would not be surprised if this happened in any busy practice in a heavily populated area (say almost anywhere between Boston and Washington where you're not out in the sticks). People there go thru life a certain combination of stressed and lazy that desensitizes them to all kinds of important stuff. All the more so if you're doing a job that's a. stressful in itself and b. doesn't pay all that great.
 
2012-09-23 10:16:45 PM
This much - a 12 oz. will do a 3 BR 2 Ba home and yard.

The way to make the easiest broadcast is use a flour sifter and lightly dust all carpets and sleep spots.
Stomp in carpet with a broom.
It stays effective until one gets it wet.
So, shampoo the carpets? Redo the sifter.
 
2012-09-23 10:45:53 PM
Okay either something got FUBAR in the paperwork or that office is a lawsuit waiting to happen.
 
2012-09-23 11:03:56 PM
i4.photobucket.com
What's all this I keep hearing about 'youth in Asia'?
 
2012-09-23 11:05:29 PM
Well I'm open to suggestion, I've been through a whole box of Frontline and Sonja still has fleas.
 
2012-09-23 11:12:27 PM

Gyrfalcon: Oh, fine.

I took my old senile fat cat to the vet, wanting her put down because she was starting to act crazy and I didn't want her declining into a suffering wreck. Those scumsuckers told me they couldn't put her to sleep because "there wasn't anything medically wrong with her." I cried for five hours.

But THIS douchebag puts down a cat that just had fleas??? WHAT THE F*CK IS WRONG WITH SOME PEOPLE.


I have a feeling this vet is just an idiot. I can understand your frustration at a vet refusing to put an animal down though. About 8 years ago, my ex-wife's family's cat was suffering from lymphoma, had stopped grooming herself (long haired cat) and was something like 15-16 years old. Their vet refused to put her down, and instead kept prescribing subcutaneous fluids that hey had to give her at home by inserting the needle into the skin on her back. To top it off, at the time, my ex's father was terminally ill with cancer so her mother was dealing with having to take care of her husband watching him die, while the vet was also forcing them to keep their cat alive when it should have been euthanized. 

\ My last cat passed away at the emergency vet's office while we were on our way to say goodbye and have him euthanized - he had an enlarged heart for years and had an embolism the night before that immobilized his hind legs. Opted to have him cared for overnight in hopes the embolism would break up and he'd get function back, but he didn't make it
 
2012-09-23 11:25:35 PM
They Shoot Children Don't They?
farm3.staticflickr.com
 
2012-09-23 11:44:26 PM

The Book Was Better: Well I'm open to suggestion, I've been through a whole box of Frontline and Sonja still has fleas.


We took in a stray cat with a bad infestation.
The vet prescribed a one-time pill. Withing minutes, fleas were falling off the cat: you could see them.
Unfortunately, I don't remember the name of it: I do know It's not available over the counter.
after that, Frontline worked as a preventative.
 
2012-09-23 11:44:33 PM

beakerxf: When I adopted Izzy, the shelter said he was probably dumped by a college student since he was found just after summer break started. Pretty routine for them to pick up lots of well-fed, docile strays the first or second week of June.


What sort of sociopath would do that to a domesticated animal?
 
2012-09-23 11:50:31 PM
For DOGS, we have Comfortis (Spinosad). That stuff is brutal: fleas start dying within minutes and falling off, pretty much guaranteed 100% kill in under an hour and stays absolutely lethal for over a month. Had to do it for one of my dogs who gets hot spots and flea bites are probably related to causing that.

Unfortunately, it's still not available for cats. Not sure why.

There are horror stories people report on the Internet about it being incredibly toxic to some dogs. But that doesn't give a full picture, flea and heartworm medicines do have some one-in-million kind of risk where they die outright. Sometimes they may have had a stroke or something coincidentally on the same day (or the next) as they try a new medication. I think the thing is, the nature of the 100% quick-kill freaks people out so much they severely overreport any possible problem.

Truth is, we have 2 low-cost vets here in town who primarily do vaccinations and dispense heartworm/flea medicine to as many residents as they can. Probably dispense like 10x more than a typical vet office. They go through a mfg-written script of "possible side effects" and make it clear that if anything happens please call them right away.

The thing is, they've NEVER seen a reaction in the dogs they've given it to, IIRC. So, WTF?
 
2012-09-23 11:50:52 PM

ScreamingHangover: The Book Was Better: Well I'm open to suggestion, I've been through a whole box of Frontline and Sonja still has fleas.

We took in a stray cat with a bad infestation.
The vet prescribed a one-time pill. Withing minutes, fleas were falling off the cat: you could see them.
Unfortunately, I don't remember the name of it: I do know It's not available over the counter.
after that, Frontline worked as a preventative.


Wait... sorry we don't use Frontline: We've had good luck with Revolution
It's expensive, but it works.
We have 3 indoor/outdoor cats in Hawaii where there's a huge stray and flea population year round, and no flea problems in over 10 year.
 
2012-09-24 12:42:19 AM

basemetal: beakerxf: basemetal: beakerxf: This indicates that someone dropping off healthy animals to be killed is pretty routine at his office.

I'm also bugged when the term "euthanasia" when a healthy animal dies. Euthanasia implies a humane attempt to end suffering. If an animal isn't wanted and you inject it with chemicals to end its life against its will, you've killed it. Stop trying to make it seem like it was an act of kindness.

There was a story in the local news over the spring break about college kids who dumped their pets off at the pound over spring break because kids couldn't afford to board them or find someone to take care of their pets and would rather go party it up. Most never leave the pound again and are euthanized.

When I adopted Izzy, the shelter said he was probably dumped by a college student since he was found just after summer break started. Pretty routine for them to pick up lots of well-fed, docile strays the first or second week of June.

[farm4.staticflickr.com image 640x480]

This is my Izzy.


Here's my Izzy after one of his first experiences with the vacuum cleaner.

farm7.staticflickr.com
 
2012-09-24 01:16:30 AM
Methinks a civil suit is warranted.
 
2012-09-24 01:27:47 AM

Magorn: CSB:
I have a kitty that is hyper-sensitive to fleas, her skin gets scabby anywhere they bite her. After experimentation with every single anti-flea product for cats on the market I found only two that worked:

Frontline which costs $50 for three doses from the vet and on her worked for only two weeks at a time instead of the full month (so I always worried about ODing her)

and the stuff i least expected to work: The "nature's guardian" drops that claim as active ingredients no chemicals and all plant oils:
Active Ingredients:
Peppermint oil...........................3.00%
Cinnamon oil.............................4.50%
Lemon grass oil.......................4.50%
Clove oil.....................................5.00%
Thyme oil...................................5.00%


Stuff works like a farking champ (it "stinks" to high heaven- I like the smell but you can smell you cat coming from 100 yards when you first apply it), last for $30 days, ad you can now buy single dose packages of it at Dollar Tree


I always heard essential oils are toxic to cats because their livers can't filter them properly, and they gradually build up to toxic levels.
 
2012-09-24 01:35:25 AM

calm like a bomb: ladyfortuna: From what I've read around the 'net, flea shampoo/bath isn't really much different from regular bath... right?

A little. They do contain some form of insecticide. If it's decent, it works for a shortish period of time, which is only somewhat effective as there will be a hatch cycle in your house, and inevitably they get re-infected. The continuous protection topicals really are the best bet.

/DON'T get medical advice from the guy at the feed store
//that little oopsie wound up costing over 6k, although I saved all eight of them


I meant that more in terms of procedure, sorry. My SIL used to be a vet tech and told us to skip the flea bath all together since the fleas will just swarm up to their heads. Plus what I thought was pet shampoo turned out to be dog only shampoo, so I ended up returning it to petmeds. The flea powder I bought, if anyone is interested, was the fleabusters ~2 pound container from Amazon; I see other people linking boric acid stuff, it's basically the active ingredient and I think something like talcum powder; you have to use a broom to get it into the carpet and cracks. Messy, but effective. Prices vary.
 
2012-09-24 02:00:51 AM
Flea comb and rubbing alcohol works in a pinch, but fleas in Florida are immune to Frontline. Revolution is ok, but I think what zapped all the fleas in my house was a vet only... I forget the name, but it worked. 0 fleas, and since Stanley the slut is indoors only, no reinfection.
//posted with Stanley drooling on my knee
 
2012-09-24 02:09:48 AM

ScreamingHangover: ScreamingHangover: The Book Was Better: Well I'm open to suggestion, I've been through a whole box of Frontline and Sonja still has fleas.

We took in a stray cat with a bad infestation.
The vet prescribed a one-time pill. Withing minutes, fleas were falling off the cat: you could see them.
Unfortunately, I don't remember the name of it: I do know It's not available over the counter.
after that, Frontline worked as a preventative.

Wait... sorry we don't use Frontline: We've had good luck with Revolution
It's expensive, but it works.
We have 3 indoor/outdoor cats in Hawaii where there's a huge stray and flea population year round, and no flea problems in over 10 year.


We switched my pups to some multi-month injection after the Pfizer contamination issue, but it managed to knock out some frontline resistant fleas, so that's great. I've got dogs only so I treat my house with pyrethrins and an IGR (I can't remember the active ingredient). Mix it with a rigorous vaccumming routine and maybe some candle traps, and you can clear them in about a week. If you have fleas, it's not your animal, it's your house, though don't forget for a mild infestation you can use your pet as a flea honey pot by treating them and letting them have access to the infested area (most flea treatment is flea birth control, so the second they feed they end up infertile which is a super effective way to break the flea life cycle)

To people saying "Put down boric acid" or diatomaceous earth, remember it does the same thing to mammalian lungs. Dogs in particular can end up with scarred lungs if they kick up the dust when they go about sniffing stuff.
 
2012-09-24 03:17:04 AM

kbotc: We switched my pups to some multi-month injection after the Pfizer contamination issue, but it managed to knock out some frontline resistant fleas, so that's great. I've got dogs only so I treat my house with pyrethrins and an IGR (I can't remember the active ingredient). Mix it with a rigorous vaccumming routine and maybe some candle traps, and you can clear them in about a week. If you have fleas, it's not your animal, it's your house, though don't forget for a mild infestation you can use your pet as a flea honey pot by treating them and letting them have access to the infested area (most flea treatment is flea birth control, so the second they feed they end up infertile which is a super effective way to break the flea life cycle)

To people saying "Put down boric acid" or diatomaceous earth, remember it does the same thing to mammalian lungs. Dogs in particular can end up with scarred lungs if they kick up the dust when they go about sniffing stuff.


We had a really bad infestation in our house when I was a kid. My dad's solution was to get the dog dipped and checked into the kennel. Then we went on vacation for a week. After he loaded us into the station wagon, his last act was to release the bug bombs. That did it.
 
2012-09-24 03:35:02 AM
"You want the bodies?" You want your eyes back, creep? C'mon, name one situation where that line is in any way okay.
 
2012-09-24 08:12:02 AM

laulaja: Sue vet for malpractice. Sadly, that won't bring Lady back.
Cat flea preps only; #1 choice, keep cats inside. #2 choice, get a cat-flea collar.


My cat is an indoor cat and has been all his life. Despite this, he somehow acquired a collection of fleas. We still have no idea how, but being that this is the south, it's not impossible that some outdoor flea hitched a ride in on someone's pants and found a congenial cat.

Flea shampoo, flea powder, a flea collar, and various other treatments were ineffective. We finally used Frontline to kill the fleas on the cat, plus several flea traps (heat + light + sticky stuff) strategically located around the house to get the ones not on the cat.

So keeping the cat inside and using a flea collar doesn't necessarily do the job. We try to avoid the heavy-duty chemical warfare (the cat is a Bengal and their reactions can be a bit idiosyncratic) but that's what it finally took to kill the little buggers. Or bugs. I'm going to look into the herbal stuff.
 
2012-09-24 10:21:04 AM
Ohhh, I'd say a civil lawsuit and then a nice 48-hour public shaming in the stocks, Puritan style, for not only the incompetent vet but his idiot staff as well.

Plus free buckets of pig slop for the crowd to throw.
 
2012-09-24 11:30:04 AM

Oznog: For DOGS, we have Comfortis (Spinosad). That stuff is brutal: fleas start dying within minutes and falling off, pretty much guaranteed 100% kill in under an hour and stays absolutely lethal for over a month. Had to do it for one of my dogs who gets hot spots and flea bites are probably related to causing that.

Unfortunately, it's still not available for cats. Not sure why.

There are horror stories people report on the Internet about it being incredibly toxic to some dogs. But that doesn't give a full picture, flea and heartworm medicines do have some one-in-million kind of risk where they die outright. Sometimes they may have had a stroke or something coincidentally on the same day (or the next) as they try a new medication. I think the thing is, the nature of the 100% quick-kill freaks people out so much they severely overreport any possible problem.

Truth is, we have 2 low-cost vets here in town who primarily do vaccinations and dispense heartworm/flea medicine to as many residents as they can. Probably dispense like 10x more than a typical vet office. They go through a mfg-written script of "possible side effects" and make it clear that if anything happens please call them right away.

The thing is, they've NEVER seen a reaction in the dogs they've given it to, IIRC. So, WTF?


The answer to why they make that for dogs and not cats is very likely :pyrethrins

Its a plant extract from Marigolds that is insanely lethal to insects, but unfortunately toxic to cats (but not dogs) s'why you never want to interchange flea products for the animals
 
2012-09-24 11:33:01 AM

doloresonthedottedline: Magorn: CSB:
I have a kitty that is hyper-sensitive to fleas, her skin gets scabby anywhere they bite her. After experimentation with every single anti-flea product for cats on the market I found only two that worked:

Frontline which costs $50 for three doses from the vet and on her worked for only two weeks at a time instead of the full month (so I always worried about ODing her)

and the stuff i least expected to work: The "nature's guardian" drops that claim as active ingredients no chemicals and all plant oils:
Active Ingredients:
Peppermint oil...........................3.00%
Cinnamon oil.............................4.50%
Lemon grass oil.......................4.50%
Clove oil.....................................5.00%
Thyme oil...................................5.00%


Stuff works like a farking champ (it "stinks" to high heaven- I like the smell but you can smell you cat coming from 100 yards when you first apply it), last for $30 days, ad you can now buy single dose packages of it at Dollar Tree

I always heard essential oils are toxic to cats because their livers can't filter them properly, and they gradually build up to toxic levels.


According to what I've read, they are toxic, but only if is Ingested, so you want to apply it where the cats can't groom themselves(between the sholder blades) and keep kitties from grooming each other until it dries. After that it apparently stays in the fur/skin but doesn't go in the bloodstream
 
2012-09-24 12:06:39 PM
Pro-tip:

Frontline (not Frontline Plus!) is the same thing for cats and dogs. You pay for them to measure the doses for you. Want to save bucks? The measurement is .08 for every ten pounds.

So, in my house, I get one four-pack for large dogs.

Two big dogs, get one each. Two medium/small dogs, get the .08 dosage which takes care of almost all of the third container. Four cats, get .08 each, and that's all of the fourth one plus the little bit of leftover in the third one.

One four-pack treats eight animals. Voila.
 
2012-09-24 12:12:01 PM
In regards to the story, I can tell ya how it probably happened.

Cat in for flea bath. Vet says needs to have yearly vax in order to receive bath. Some small animal in the hospital is scheduled to be euthanized. Vet pockets euthanasia solution in one pocket, and puts this cat's FVRCP in the other. Both are pink. Goes to give cat yearly vax, instead gives subq overdose of barbiturates. Meanwhile, is wondering why the euthanasia is not going down.
 
2012-09-24 12:18:30 PM

Magorn: Its a plant extract from Marigolds that is insanely lethal to insects, but unfortunately toxic to cats (but not dogs)


I'm afraid that's not very accurate. It's all about dosing (excepting the idiosyncratic reactors)- cats and small dogs just can't handle too much of it. Cats can handle less, which is why you see more feline overdoses. In the right amounts, not a problem. And it's chrysanthemums, not marigolds.
 
2012-09-24 12:23:28 PM

TaylorSalad: Cat in for flea bath. Vet says needs to have yearly vax in order to receive bath. Some small animal in the hospital is scheduled to be euthanized. Vet pockets euthanasia solution in one pocket, and puts this cat's FVRCP in the other. Both are pink. Goes to give cat yearly vax, instead gives subq overdose of barbiturates. Meanwhile, is wondering why the euthanasia is not going down.


I dunno. A mL of euthasol (volume of the vaccine) is good for a 10lb animal, and I don't know anybody who uses less than two for feline euthanasias. I'm sure they are out there, but it costs next to nothing, and we all worry about underdosing. I think every vet school tells you the horror story about the "euthanized" dog that was found walking around the clinic the next morning.
 
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