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(The Atlantic)   The era of Political TV began 60 years ago, when Nixon decided to mention Checkers   (theatlantic.com) divider line 47
    More: Interesting, democratic coalition, economic interests, silent majority, Alger Hiss, Richard Nixon, Checkers speech, Eisenhower  
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873 clicks; posted to Politics » on 23 Sep 2012 at 5:07 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-22 11:43:47 PM
Cocker Spaniels rule.
 
2012-09-22 11:53:10 PM
SHUT UP, DAMMIT!
 
2012-09-22 11:55:18 PM
It might have been the beginning of political TV, but it was still the same old political theater invented millennia before
 
2012-09-23 12:02:44 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It might have been the beginning of political TV, but it was still the same old political theater invented millennia before


It was a game changer just like the internet will probably be seen in 50 years.
 
2012-09-23 12:05:31 AM
 
2012-09-23 12:08:56 AM

davidphogan: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It might have been the beginning of political TV, but it was still the same old political theater invented millennia before

It was a game changer just like the internet will probably be seen in 50 years.


I'm not sure how inventing a new shovel changes what you're shoveling
 
2012-09-23 12:10:47 AM

fusillade762: profoundly shaped Nixon's personal and professional outlook, convincing him that television was a way to do an end-run around the press and the political "establishment."

The 1960 debate probably didn't help with that.

As the story goes, those who listened to the debate on the radio thought Nixon had won. But those listeners were in the minority. By 1960, 88% of American households had televisions - up from just 11% the decade before. The number of viewers who tuned in to the debate has been estimated as high as 74 million, by the Nielsen of the day, Broadcast Magazine. Those that watched the debate on TV thought Kennedy was the clear winner.


Actually, that debate is the single defining thing that created his 1968 campaign. He learned better than anyone what power TV had and how he had to harness it. He was constantly going to Florida just to go tan, while keeping the minimum amount of releases possible to control what the press talked about. You're familiar with that strategy, we all are. The GOP hasn't fundamentally changed it since then.
 
2012-09-23 12:19:38 AM
Notes from the Issaquah Fark Party:

Oh, bullshiat.

Also, Mexicans are assholes. (Caveat from Barbie Dream Hearse: not Mexican-Americans, we mean MEXICAN Mexicans. Like Mitt Romney. )
 
2012-09-23 12:24:27 AM

GAT_00: Actually, that debate is the single defining thing that created his 1968 campaign. He learned better than anyone what power TV had and how he had to harness it. He was constantly going to Florida just to go tan, while keeping the minimum amount of releases possible to control what the press talked about. You're familiar with that strategy, we all are. The GOP hasn't fundamentally changed it since then.


Well, the GOP now applies spray tanner.
 
2012-09-23 01:32:38 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: davidphogan: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It might have been the beginning of political TV, but it was still the same old political theater invented millennia before

It was a game changer just like the internet will probably be seen in 50 years.

I'm not sure how inventing a new shovel changes what you're shoveling


I would say it's more of the difference between a shovel and a bulldozer.
 
2012-09-23 05:19:12 AM
Article from a Nixon speechwriter. Hmmm.
 
2012-09-23 05:24:58 AM
pat had a good cloth republican coat but what did she wear underneath?

giggity
 
2012-09-23 05:27:21 AM

fusillade762: profoundly shaped Nixon's personal and professional outlook, convincing him that television was a way to do an end-run around the press and the political "establishment."

The 1960 debate probably didn't help with that.

As the story goes, those who listened to the debate on the radio thought Nixon had won. But those listeners were in the minority. By 1960, 88% of American households had televisions - up from just 11% the decade before. The number of viewers who tuned in to the debate has been estimated as high as 74 million, by the Nielsen of the day, Broadcast Magazine. Those that watched the debate on TV thought Kennedy was the clear winner.


Because Nixon didn't shave.
 
2012-09-23 05:33:21 AM
ARROOOOOO!!!!!
 
2012-09-23 06:10:07 AM

fusillade762: profoundly shaped Nixon's personal and professional outlook, convincing him that television was a way to do an end-run around the press and the political "establishment."

The 1960 debate probably didn't help with that.

As the story goes, those who listened to the debate on the radio thought Nixon had won. But those listeners were in the minority. By 1960, 88% of American households had televisions - up from just 11% the decade before. The number of viewers who tuned in to the debate has been estimated as high as 74 million, by the Nielsen of the day, Broadcast Magazine. Those that watched the debate on TV thought Kennedy was the clear winner.


The TV Audience from that debate was likely far younger and less conservative than the people who were still holding out and listening to the debate on the radio.
 
2012-09-23 06:31:14 AM

MurphyMurphy: ARROOOOOO!!!!!


I came here for this.
 
2012-09-23 06:47:12 AM
WHAR PEDIGREE PAPERS WHAR
 
2012-09-23 07:12:18 AM

davidphogan: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It might have been the beginning of political TV, but it was still the same old political theater invented millennia before

It was a game changer just like the internet will probably be seen in 50 years.


A lot of the talking heads are saying this election
will be studied for being the first fact checked in real time
not by the media

One of the mistakes the Romney campaign is making is not understanding: Everyone is receiving information and what they say in real time.
They can't move from town to town on same day and pander another line of crap without being called out

Can you imagine waiting 2-3 days after Paul Ryan's speech for the main stream media to delicately say how much bs was in the speech?
 
2012-09-23 07:17:51 AM
I highly recommend "The $elling of the President".

The Nixon campaign used television to their advantage and did it well. They also were wise to hire ad agencies that could turn him into a "product".
 
2012-09-23 08:15:35 AM
I don't think I understand the Checkers Speech
We went over it in school, but forget why it's so important
 
2012-09-23 08:26:03 AM

bdub77: GAT_00: Actually, that debate is the single defining thing that created his 1968 campaign. He learned better than anyone what power TV had and how he had to harness it. He was constantly going to Florida just to go tan, while keeping the minimum amount of releases possible to control what the press talked about. You're familiar with that strategy, we all are. The GOP hasn't fundamentally changed it since then.

Well, the GOP now applies spray tanner.


thejunction.net
 
2012-09-23 08:59:19 AM
Ironic - just when they got Citizens United, and finally acheived their dream of being able to spend virtually infinite money on political advertising, political advertising may be becoming worthless, due to Internets.
That would be funny.
Spend millions on an attack ad, only to have it debunked online the next day.
Heh.
 
2012-09-23 09:01:26 AM

jso2897: Ironic - just when they got Citizens United, and finally acheived their dream of being able to spend virtually infinite money on political advertising, political advertising may be becoming worthless, due to Internets.
That would be funny.
Spend millions on an attack ad, only to have it debunked online the next day.
Heh.


Well, that, and picking the worst candidates ever seen.
 
2012-09-23 09:04:00 AM

Bocasio: davidphogan: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It might have been the beginning of political TV, but it was still the same old political theater invented millennia before

It was a game changer just like the internet will probably be seen in 50 years.

A lot of the talking heads are saying this election
will be studied for being the first fact checked in real time
not by the media

One of the mistakes the Romney campaign is making is not understanding: Everyone is receiving information and what they say in real time.
They can't move from town to town on same day and pander another line of crap without being called out

Can you imagine waiting 2-3 days after Paul Ryan's speech for the main stream media to delicately say how much bs was in the speech?


Eh, if anything the influence of the internet is going to be overblown.

For example, in 1948 campaign Dewey infamously said that a train engineer "should probably be shot" for backing up a train during his speech. The remark spread like wildfire across the nation via the wire service. It was the "47 percent" remark of that campaign.

The point is that even before TV became widespread the infrastructure has existed for gaffes to be instantly reported around the country.
 
2012-09-23 09:19:01 AM

jso2897: Spend millions on an attack ad, only to have it debunked online the next day.


But they still re-use it, even after it's been debunked.
 
2012-09-23 09:21:56 AM

thornhill: Bocasio:
The point is that even before TV became widespread the infrastructure has existed for gaffes to be instantly reported around the country.


The difference is that now anybody is capable of sending off that gaffe. Twenty years ago only the major networks had that clout. Back in 1948 there were likely plenty of independent newspapers (along with plenty of Hearst clones, the Newscorp of the day).

The Romney campaign is going batshait due the idea that there might be fact checking outside of their pet "liberal" media.
 
2012-09-23 09:25:44 AM

jso2897: Ironic - just when they got Citizens United, and finally acheived their dream of being able to spend virtually infinite money on political advertising, political advertising may be becoming worthless, due to Internets.
That would be funny.
Spend millions on an attack ad, only to have it debunked online the next day.
Heh.


Not everyone uses that new-fangled intranet or what have you. The nice young man in the American Online only tells those people if they've got mail.
 
2012-09-23 09:42:04 AM

GAT_00: SHUT UP, DAMMIT!


Yup! Saw that on Netflix again just last night. Awesome.

/I'm meeting you halfway, you stupid hippies!
 
2012-09-23 09:50:14 AM

yet_another_wumpus: thornhill: Bocasio:
The point is that even before TV became widespread the infrastructure has existed for gaffes to be instantly reported around the country.

The difference is that now anybody is capable of sending off that gaffe. Twenty years ago only the major networks had that clout. Back in 1948 there were likely plenty of independent newspapers (along with plenty of Hearst clones, the Newscorp of the day).

The Romney campaign is going batshait due the idea that there might be fact checking outside of their pet "liberal" media.


These are just excuses for the simple fact that the Romney campaign is one of the most inept recent history, and that Romney himself is probably the worst candidate in a generation.

The issue is not that the gaffes are being so rapidly and easily reported, but that Romney makes so many of them.

And as for saying flat out lies and being called out for them, that's nothing new. The Romney campaign is using the age old tactic of saying something false so often that people begin to believe it. But it's not working this time because the Obama campaign is doing an excellent job refuting everything. As hard as it is to believe, Democrats actually learned a lesson after John Kerry was swiftboated.

And the Romney campaign wouldn't have to resort to lying about Obama if they actually came up with policy. That's their other major problem of the Romney campaign -- it doesn't really have any policy proposals, so it's left to just trying to demonize Obama.
 
2012-09-23 09:54:43 AM
graphics8.nytimes.com

We heard Nixon kicked that sweet doggie.
 
2012-09-23 10:06:44 AM

Wyalt Derp: jso2897: Spend millions on an attack ad, only to have it debunked online the next day.

But they still re-use it, even after it's been debunked.


I understand Thornhills point and both campaigns do seem to keep advertising long after narrative is ineffective.

Both parties use of advertising is very interesting:
The famous Obama commercial that has a man speaking of his wife's death after not having insurance, aside from its effectiveness the commercial was only placed on YouTube. The surrogates of the Obama superpack never used any money to broadcast it.

The Romney campaing calling foul and blaming the President and the news media replaying it for context was an interesting judo move.

Even from the start Republicans saying they had an unlimited war chest to use in advertising speaks to the idea of repetition and dissemination will prevail.

Seems the Romney team isn't running a political campaign but an advertising campaign.

I honestly hate to keep harping on about the Romney campaign. I'm still vey fascinated how this is playing out.
 
2012-09-23 10:32:17 AM
Say what you want about Nixon, but unlike the current GOP crook running for president, Nixon did have an elevator for his car.
 
2012-09-23 11:03:00 AM

GAT_00: fusillade762: profoundly shaped Nixon's personal and professional outlook, convincing him that television was a way to do an end-run around the press and the political "establishment."

The 1960 debate probably didn't help with that.

As the story goes, those who listened to the debate on the radio thought Nixon had won. But those listeners were in the minority. By 1960, 88% of American households had televisions - up from just 11% the decade before. The number of viewers who tuned in to the debate has been estimated as high as 74 million, by the Nielsen of the day, Broadcast Magazine. Those that watched the debate on TV thought Kennedy was the clear winner.

Actually, that debate is the single defining thing that created his 1968 campaign. He learned better than anyone what power TV had and how he had to harness it. He was constantly going to Florida just to go tan, while keeping the minimum amount of releases possible to control what the press talked about. You're familiar with that strategy, we all are. The GOP hasn't fundamentally changed it since then.


Possibly not true: Link
 
2012-09-23 11:24:08 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: davidphogan: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It might have been the beginning of political TV, but it was still the same old political theater invented millennia before

It was a game changer just like the internet will probably be seen in 50 years.

I'm not sure how inventing a new shovel changes what you're shoveling


You can just move a lot more of it.

sprinklerdoc.com
 
2012-09-23 11:33:29 AM

Insatiable Jesus: fusillade762: profoundly shaped Nixon's personal and professional outlook, convincing him that television was a way to do an end-run around the press and the political "establishment."

The 1960 debate probably didn't help with that.

As the story goes, those who listened to the debate on the radio thought Nixon had won. But those listeners were in the minority. By 1960, 88% of American households had televisions - up from just 11% the decade before. The number of viewers who tuned in to the debate has been estimated as high as 74 million, by the Nielsen of the day, Broadcast Magazine. Those that watched the debate on TV thought Kennedy was the clear winner.

Because Nixon didn't shave.


I heard that being a good homophobe, he got weirded out when they tried to put makeup on him and went out Au Natural. Kennedy on the other hand brought his own makeup people.
 
2012-09-23 11:39:22 AM
I like 5 guys myself, but I can see how Checkers can be controversial...They are so hit or miss, but their fries are consistently good.
 
2012-09-23 11:57:44 AM

midpoint: GAT_00: fusillade762: profoundly shaped Nixon's personal and professional outlook, convincing him that television was a way to do an end-run around the press and the political "establishment."

The 1960 debate probably didn't help with that.

As the story goes, those who listened to the debate on the radio thought Nixon had won. But those listeners were in the minority. By 1960, 88% of American households had televisions - up from just 11% the decade before. The number of viewers who tuned in to the debate has been estimated as high as 74 million, by the Nielsen of the day, Broadcast Magazine. Those that watched the debate on TV thought Kennedy was the clear winner.

Actually, that debate is the single defining thing that created his 1968 campaign. He learned better than anyone what power TV had and how he had to harness it. He was constantly going to Florida just to go tan, while keeping the minimum amount of releases possible to control what the press talked about. You're familiar with that strategy, we all are. The GOP hasn't fundamentally changed it since then.

Possibly not true: Link


Wow, you had to search really hard to find that crappy blog. Seriously, I get all my information about American politics from AJE?
 
2012-09-23 12:24:32 PM
Great story. Well told. Probably the biggest political gamble and win in the history of presidential elections. In fact it the story wasn't real I'd probably accuse it of being fake it's so good. Nixon was on the bubble. His 75,000 dollar half hour teevee prime time ad buy was his only shot at political redemption and he absolutely nailed it.

Funny looking back on Nixon's populist rhetoric now, particularly the "Pat's good republican cloth coat" stuff. I'm trying to imagine Romney making similar noises and just laughing.

"all you have got to do in this country of ours is just to tell the people the truth."

~RM Nixon. 

This quote conflicts me.
 
2012-09-23 12:27:46 PM

thornhill: Romney himself is probably the worst candidate in a generation.



He's up there, but Kerry was a pretty terrible candidate.  The Swift Boat/Flip-flop BS aside, he just did zero to energize his base.  And certainly gave nothing to independents/undecideds.
 
Gore was a good candidate on paper... but farked up by staying away from Clinton and not making the environment a hot topic.
 
AgaIn, just talking about this generation as you mentioned.
 
2012-09-23 01:52:25 PM

downstairs: thornhill: Romney himself is probably the worst candidate in a generation.


He's up there, but Kerry was a pretty terrible candidate.  The Swift Boat/Flip-flop BS aside, he just did zero to energize his base.  And certainly gave nothing to independents/undecideds.
 
Gore was a good candidate on paper... but farked up by staying away from Clinton and not making the environment a hot topic.
 
AgaIn, just talking about this generation as you mentioned.


I'm not saying that either Kerry or Gore were good candidates, but Kerry largely got outmaneuvered by Bush, never providing an adequate response to the swiftboating and charges of flip-flopping. Gore's issue was strategic -- not using Clinton more, and failing to point out the stark contrasts between himself and Bush.

Romney occupies his own level of incompetence because most of his wounds have been self-inflicted, such as 1) His many quotes that have revealed how he lives in a bubble of wealth, e.g. "[I don't follow NASCAR] as closely as some of the most ardent fans. But I have some great friends who are NASCAR team owners;" 2) His refusal to release tax returns, which have dominated the media cycle for weeks; 3) His complete failure on foreign policy, from the whole Libya debacle to insulting British; and 4) The 47 percent.

These were all blunders by him that a more disciplined campaigner would have never made, and the net result is that he's been on the defensive since he secured the nomination in spring. The Obama campaign doesn't really have to do anything but sit back and wait for the next Mitt gaffe, of which there seems to be a new one each week. Heck, you even have the right wing media attacking Romney over the 47 percent.
 
2012-09-23 02:10:15 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: davidphogan: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It might have been the beginning of political TV, but it was still the same old political theater invented millennia before

It was a game changer just like the internet will probably be seen in 50 years.

I'm not sure how inventing a new shovel changes what you're shoveling


When you put a shovel in everyone's hands, more and fouler shiat gets shoveled.
 
2012-09-23 02:40:37 PM

GAT_00: midpoint: GAT_00: fusillade762: profoundly shaped Nixon's personal and professional outlook, convincing him that television was a way to do an end-run around the press and the political "establishment."

The 1960 debate probably didn't help with that.

As the story goes, those who listened to the debate on the radio thought Nixon had won. But those listeners were in the minority. By 1960, 88% of American households had televisions - up from just 11% the decade before. The number of viewers who tuned in to the debate has been estimated as high as 74 million, by the Nielsen of the day, Broadcast Magazine. Those that watched the debate on TV thought Kennedy was the clear winner.

Actually, that debate is the single defining thing that created his 1968 campaign. He learned better than anyone what power TV had and how he had to harness it. He was constantly going to Florida just to go tan, while keeping the minimum amount of releases possible to control what the press talked about. You're familiar with that strategy, we all are. The GOP hasn't fundamentally changed it since then.

Possibly not true: Link

Wow, you had to search really hard to find that crappy blog. Seriously, I get all my information about American politics from AJE?


I didn't say that you did. I merely pointed out fairly politely that you might be perpetuating a myth. The AJE link is as the latest example of the myth {at the time} of that post by 'W. Joseph Campbell, a tenured full professor in the School of Communication at American University in Washington, D.C. He is a former professional journalist, having reported for the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Hartford Courant, and the Associated Press in a 20-year career that took him across North America to Europe, Asia, and West Africa'. . He even links to the paper in which the myth was debunked: Link
 
2012-09-23 03:34:50 PM

r1chard3: I heard that being a good homophobe, he got weirded out when they tried to put makeup on him and went out Au Natural. Kennedy on the other hand brought his own makeup people.


Kennedy brought makeup people with him because he'd been deathly ill and was jaundiced, so they knew they needed to cover him up. Nixon had been on TV before without makeup and hadn't had any problem.
 
2012-09-23 04:02:11 PM
"Sock it to ME??"
 
2012-09-23 06:43:26 PM
nope. It began during the nixon/kennedy debate.
 
2012-09-24 01:27:49 AM
Yes, and some of you make wonderful apologies about this total piece of sh*t.

Buh buh he'd look like a LIBERAL today!
 
2012-09-25 02:33:38 AM
I'm not calling Nixon a saint by any means, but he was an effective president... and even vice-president.

Eisenhower was lazy as president - put in more rounds of golf than Obama - and Nixon was essentially a co-president for foreign affairs. One of the masterpieces - the 'Kitchen Debate' (1959) with Khrushchev - was based on Nixon's preparation for the impromptu event. It really opened the door for the openness of dialog and ultimately détente that he achieved with the ABM treaty in 1972. Isreal got disengagement agreements with Syria and Egypt negotiated by his administration as well that paved the way for the Camp David Accord under Carter.

Aside from that, he opened China as a trade partner, ended the Vietnam war, generally reduced federal government while still establishing the EPA.

Not happy that he ended the Apollo missions and not sure he did enough for civil rights with desegregation. Oh, yeah, that Watergate thing was just nuts.

Best foreign policy President we had in the 20th century (sorry Reganites). Domestically good.... but paranoia ultimately did him in.
 
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