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(High Times) Video I learned it from watching you   (hightimes.com) divider line 17
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6421 clicks; posted to Video » on 22 Sep 2012 at 7:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-22 03:48:25 PM
dammit That was my idea 3 years ago omg thats just wrong:(
 
2012-09-22 04:23:46 PM
don't let your kids smoke crappy weed.
 
2012-09-22 07:32:46 PM
I Guess dad has better connections. At least the kid's bad weed is better than the weed (tea) I bought from that skinny dude in Savannah. Beware of skinny dudes in Savannah.
 
2012-09-22 08:46:46 PM
Again the need for a "Spliffy" tag.
 
2012-09-22 08:50:07 PM
I have about ten years to figure out how I am going to explain weed to my kids. It's not going to be easy.

Speaking of shiatty pot. I just left a tropical third world country and the best I could find was the worst shake you can imagine. Forget stems, the shiat had logs in it. You would think anyplace you can pay about four hundred bucks Total for six girls to love you long time in your hotel room would have decent weed.
 
2012-09-22 09:02:05 PM

BigTexas: Again the need for a "Spliffy" tag.


coppermine.constantmayhem.com
 
2012-09-22 10:16:49 PM
I'm all for decriminalization but we need to be prepared for the unintended consequences. There are personalities and situations where like with alcohol, there are those who can't handle it well. Once someone falls into the trap of being a stoner it ruins their life just as if it were alcoholism.
 
2012-09-22 11:45:56 PM

lohphat: I'm all for decriminalization but we need to be prepared for the unintended consequences. There are personalities and situations where like with alcohol, there are those who can't handle it well. Once someone falls into the trap of being a stoner it ruins their life just as if it were alcoholism.


So.... nothing would change except for fewer people being made into criminals. I'm OK with this.
 
2012-09-23 12:00:38 AM

lohphat: I'm all for decriminalization but we need to be prepared for the unintended consequences. There are personalities and situations where like with alcohol, there are those who can't handle it well. Once someone falls into the trap of being a stoner it ruins their life just as if it were alcoholism.


Compared to the unintended consequences of prohibition it's a risk we should all be willing to take. I think you've made a good point. Except at the end where you compared "being a stoner" with someone with "alcoholism". They are two completely different substances with completely different effects. I have known several people with addictions to one or the other or both. Alcohol is in all ways much worse for the addict themselves and everyone around them.
 
2012-09-23 12:55:33 AM
Actually got a small laugh out of that one...
 
2012-09-23 01:04:48 AM
www.gilfether.com

bath salts are the gateway
 
2012-09-23 02:30:13 AM

T.M.S.: I have about ten years to figure out how I am going to explain weed to my kids. It's not going to be easy.

Speaking of shiatty pot. I just left a tropical third world country and the best I could find was the worst shake you can imagine. Forget stems, the shiat had logs in it. You would think anyplace you can pay about four hundred bucks Total for six girls to love you long time in your hotel room would have decent weed.


Same way you would explain alcohol. Or the same way you'd explain anything that can be over-indulged and lead to life problems.
 
2012-09-23 07:22:02 AM

TheMega: Actually got a small laugh out of that one...


The father sells it. He looks genuinely angry. That's what got me.
 
2012-09-23 10:02:05 AM
For the first few seconds, I actually thought it was a real psa.
 
2012-09-23 11:05:36 AM

bingo the psych-o: lohphat: I'm all for decriminalization but we need to be prepared for the unintended consequences. There are personalities and situations where like with alcohol, there are those who can't handle it well. Once someone falls into the trap of being a stoner it ruins their life just as if it were alcoholism.

So.... nothing would change except for fewer people being made into criminals. I'm OK with this.


Well, what it would mostly do is bring the existing reality out into the light, and for many people that will be indisguishable from a "sudden" and "huge" pot "problem." The difference between this and Prohibition is that just about everyone who was around when Prohibition was lifted remembered what it was like *before* Prohibition, and alcohol was also very widely used both before and after. Pot has a very different historical curve. Because prohibition was many decades ago now (1937), not a lot of people around now remember what it was like before that. But much more, it was never widely used before prohibition, so there's no cultural normative pattern to reference for comparison to a post-prohibition society that inevitably will use it widely. And that's going to look to a lot of people like a sudden huge pot problem, when pot comes out of the closet.

I use the closet metaphor because we've seen this quite recently, and it's still going on right now. When the first laws protecting gay citizens were passed, gay people started to relax in those places, for the first time ever, now that they no longer had to fear as much. That made them more visible. Since America has never historically been a very gay-friendly place, that had the social effect of making it seem to many people that gays were suddently coming out the woodwork, and for those who didn't like them, this was a "sudden" and "huge" "problem."

So, you've both got very good points to make here. On the one hand, the reality itself won't be much different. But it will be a lot more visible, and for most of society for the first time. That can't help but have some real social and political repercussions.

In a different thread, some of us tried to explain the legal and political complications that manage to mostly prevent full decriminalisation. So the above is mostly academic, in that I guarantee you there will be no sudden legalisation, mostly because there can't be. What's much more likely is a gradual easement over several decades, revolving largely around international agreements and driven by grassroots efforts in multiple countries. That gradual progression will also do a lot to mitigate what I've described above, in much the same way that gradually expanding protections and liberty for gays has mitigated much of the negative backlash that inevitably follows such change.
 
2012-09-23 02:05:50 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: bingo the psych-o: lohphat: I'm all for decriminalization but we need to be prepared for the unintended consequences. There are personalities and situations where like with alcohol, there are those who can't handle it well. Once someone falls into the trap of being a stoner it ruins their life just as if it were alcoholism.

So.... nothing would change except for fewer people being made into criminals. I'm OK with this.

Well, what it would mostly do is bring the existing reality out into the light, and for many people that will be indisguishable from a "sudden" and "huge" pot "problem." The difference between this and Prohibition is that just about everyone who was around when Prohibition was lifted remembered what it was like *before* Prohibition, and alcohol was also very widely used both before and after. Pot has a very different historical curve. Because prohibition was many decades ago now (1937), not a lot of people around now remember what it was like before that. But much more, it was never widely used before prohibition, so there's no cultural normative pattern to reference for comparison to a post-prohibition society that inevitably will use it widely. And that's going to look to a lot of people like a sudden huge pot problem, when pot comes out of the closet.

I use the closet metaphor because we've seen this quite recently, and it's still going on right now. When the first laws protecting gay citizens were passed, gay people started to relax in those places, for the first time ever, now that they no longer had to fear as much. That made them more visible. Since America has never historically been a very gay-friendly place, that had the social effect of making it seem to many people that gays were suddently coming out the woodwork, and for those who didn't like them, this was a "sudden" and "huge" "problem."

So, you've both got very good points to make here. On the one hand, the reality itself won't be much different. But it will be a lot more visibl ...


fark all that.

It needs to be illegal until all the boomers are in the ground.

Suffering is The Lord's way.
 
2012-09-24 06:17:28 PM
The world's going to hell in a handbasket in any case. Might as well have a good buzz for the ride down.

/haven't touched the stuff in 20 years
 
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