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(Popular Mechanics)   What would a starship actually look like? Depends on the decade I suppose   (popularmechanics.com) divider line 168
    More: Interesting, Centrifugal Force, aerodynamics, Icarus, ion engines, metal spinning, burps, JAXA, spacecrafts  
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19781 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Sep 2012 at 4:58 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-22 02:57:03 PM  
More like this ugly-ass thing.

www.wired.com
 
2012-09-22 03:12:49 PM  
images.starpulse.comheight="222"> 

They looked like this in the 70's.

/image hotlinked
 
2012-09-22 03:29:23 PM  
KNEEEE DEEP IN THE HOOPLA
 
2012-09-22 04:59:42 PM  
kunochan.com
 
2012-09-22 05:02:50 PM  
fta And while impulse drives apparently dump 100 percent of their energy into thrust, a real vessel, beholden to the laws of thermodynamics, would likely be bristling with a dizzying array of panels to radiate the excess heat generated by propulsion systems.

"Apparently"? What do you think is going to warm up your Earl Grey tea, dumass?
 
2012-09-22 05:03:48 PM  
rpggamer.org
 
2012-09-22 05:03:51 PM  

make me some tea: More like this ugly-ass thing.

[www.wired.com image 800x600]


Actually, the major problem the ISS has with being converted into a spaceship is it's lack of a keel. Basically, it would crush itself if it ever tried to go anywhere.
 
2012-09-22 05:04:37 PM  

make me some tea: More like this ugly-ass thing.

[www.wired.com image 800x600]


She may not look like much, but she's got it where it counts.
 
2012-09-22 05:10:43 PM  

farkingismybusiness: make me some tea: More like this ugly-ass thing.

[www.wired.com image 800x600]

She may not look like much, but she's got it where it counts.


img.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-22 05:12:15 PM  
images1.wikia.nocookie.net

Though they exceeded their cardboard, two-dimensional character budget several times over, Avatar's fancy spaceship was surprisingly well thought out.
 
2012-09-22 05:13:20 PM  
www.coldnorth.com
 
2012-09-22 05:14:35 PM  
www.farpwg.org

/In before the rest of the Browncoats
 
2012-09-22 05:14:36 PM  
FTA: "And while impulse drives apparently dump 100 percent of their energy into thrust, a real vessel, beholden to the laws of thermodynamics, would likely be bristling with a dizzying array of panels to radiate the excess heat generated by propulsion systems."

Hey, dumbass, what's the apparent color of something hot and radiating heat?

img513.imageshack.us
 
2012-09-22 05:17:05 PM  
www.lunarbistro.com
 
2012-09-22 05:18:13 PM  
If it doesn't look like this, I'm not interested.

anthonyjosephevans.com 

This spaceship design just spoiled me. Nothing could ever beat it.
 
2012-09-22 05:21:31 PM  

Notabunny: farkingismybusiness: make me some tea: More like this ugly-ass thing.

[www.wired.com image 800x600]

She may not look like much, but she's got it where it counts.

[img.photobucket.com image 320x240]


Close. It was Picard who said that.
 
2012-09-22 05:21:33 PM  
Duh, the answer is obvious.
 
cdn.planetminecraft.com
 
2012-09-22 05:22:29 PM  
I wonder if it would be possible to create a spaceship which is controlled remotely. For instance, you build a ship and send it across the galaxy, then create a hollow area within the ship that's quantum-entangled with a special chamber located on earth where all the fleshy humans can enter and work within. I know quantum physics doesn't work that way probably, but as far as a speculative setting goes, it could make for some interesting scenarios.

/I've never understood sci fi shows that insist human beings will go everywhere. It would make far more sense to just send robots or advanced ai's or find some way to pilot all of the stuff we send into space via remote control...
 
2012-09-22 05:22:53 PM  
I've still got a geek chubby from seeing Endeavor fly over my house yesterday. It was like a birthday present from NASA.

Next year I want a Mars rover. And a pony.
 
2012-09-22 05:24:52 PM  
The Federation's mastery of time, space, and everything in between allows writers to ignore the dangers of galactic cosmic ray bombardment, seat belts, circuit breakers.


Glitchwerks: [www.lunarbistro.com image 720x478]


Oh man, that takes me back.
 
2012-09-22 05:25:48 PM  
It wouldn't have flashing lights. That's the first clue to a UFO sighting that debunks the sighting.
And other than wanting to get a scenic view, it wouldn't have windows either.
 
2012-09-22 05:28:27 PM  
yourmomlovestetris
I wonder if it would be possible to create a spaceship which is controlled remotely. For instance, you build a ship and send it across the galaxy, then create a hollow area within the ship that's quantum-entangled with a special chamber located on earth where all the fleshy humans can enter and work within. I know quantum physics doesn't work that way probably, but as far as a speculative setting goes, it could make for some interesting scenarios.
/I've never understood sci fi shows that insist human beings will go everywhere. It would make far more sense to just send robots or advanced ai's or find some way to pilot all of the stuff we send into space via remote control...


Are you throwing out a BSU 90210 troll?
 
2012-09-22 05:28:50 PM  
images.wikia.com

Mean radius 6,371.0 km[6]
Equatorial radius 6,378.1 km[7][8]
Polar radius 6,356.8 km[9]
Flattening 0.0033528[10]
Circumference 40,075.017 km (equatorial)[8]
40,007.86 km (meridional)[11][12]
Surface area

510,072,000 km2[13][14][note 5] 148,940,000 km2 land (29.2 %)
361,132,000 km2 water (70.8 %)
Volume 1.08321×1012 km3[3]
Mass 5.9736×1024 kg[3]
Mean density 5.515 g/cm3[3]
 
2012-09-22 05:30:06 PM  

yourmomlovestetris: I've never understood sci fi shows that insist human beings will go everywhere.


It's a desire.
 
2012-09-22 05:30:14 PM  
Desitny or GTFO =D

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-09-22 05:31:29 PM  
Doh Destiny even, you wouldnt mind, but I did preview that haha
 
2012-09-22 05:36:07 PM  
Link

Pick one, they all work pretty decent. Except the Caldari ones.
 
2012-09-22 05:36:17 PM  
Amazing that we've been doing space exploration for over 50 years and there's still no actual evidence concerning whether humans can give birth in space.
 
2012-09-22 05:36:28 PM  

Fark Rye For Many Whores: yourmomlovestetris: I've never understood sci fi shows that insist human beings will go everywhere.

It's a desire.


A belief system, complete with its doomsday scenarios and prophets. A religion, some might say.
 
2012-09-22 05:36:50 PM  
Like the Russian Soyuz capsule, SpaceX's Dragon currently splashes down in the ocean
vincentpaone.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-09-22 05:37:50 PM  
Sweet article. Makes me feel like a kid again. +1subby
 
2012-09-22 05:41:41 PM  
Any selfrespecting engineer would insist that it look like this.

media.spokesman.com
 
2012-09-22 05:44:15 PM  
i599.photobucket.com

or this

i289.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-22 05:44:20 PM  

yourmomlovestetris: I wonder if it would be possible to create a spaceship which is controlled remotely. For instance, you build a ship and send it across the galaxy, then create a hollow area within the ship that's quantum-entangled with a special chamber located on earth where all the fleshy humans can enter and work within. I know quantum physics doesn't work that way probably, but as far as a speculative setting goes, it could make for some interesting scenarios.

/I've never understood sci fi shows that insist human beings will go everywhere. It would make far more sense to just send robots or advanced ai's or find some way to pilot all of the stuff we send into space via remote control...


Because being there and seeing the universe for yourself is kind of the point. That's like asking why Columbus went ashore and risked hostile natives instead of just confirming that land was there via spyglass and then going home.
 
2012-09-22 05:44:55 PM  
Unfortunately there are just too many unsolved problems surrounding the idea of manned space exploration, and we haven't been working on solving any of them. We're more concerned with what the celebrity of the week is doing, which power-hungry political monster will ruin the world less than the others, and whose invisible friend would win in a fight. We spend more money on movies about going into space than we spend actually farking doing it. Maybe in three or four hundred years there will be some hope but for now sci-fi geeks like myself would have better luck looking forward to the reality in any post-apocalyptic movie starring Kevin Costner.

That said, my vote is for something like the Borg Cube. Good space efficiency (pun!) and easy to prefab before being assembled in orbit.
 
2012-09-22 05:44:58 PM  
What would it look like? Well, it depends on what inertia dampeners will look like, what artificial gravity generators look like, navigational deflectors required size to operate effectively to keep dust and space crap out of the way, and the size of the faster than light engines needed as well the size needed for the hydrogen ram scoops.

And, let's face this fact: if the ship really can't travel fast enough to make the travel time from one star system to the other in a short enough amount of time, it will only have two functions: generational vessel to establish new colonies and robotic probes to explore space. And in both cases, the biggest problem is communication between colonies and space probes. The time it would take would be years. If we developed a way of communicating at the speed of light, it would take four and a half years to communicate between Earth and Alpha Centuri.

In all honesty, I believe that we should look towards finding earth like planets with no intelligent life, that could be colonized by a group of people knowing full well, that it would be a one way trip. Given the population of Earth, sending out 3 billion people or so would help the Earth. And it really wouldn't be hard to find that many people willing to go. Just tell the Christians that these planets need to be colonized in the name of Jesus and that there is no such things as Space Muslims.
 
2012-09-22 05:45:06 PM  

Rufus Lee King: [www.yourdemocracy.net.au image 504x454]


Ah, the classic artistic mistake of having no idea what a farking shell looks like. Hint, they don't carry the casing with them.

Notabunny: fta And while impulse drives apparently dump 100 percent of their energy into thrust, a real vessel, beholden to the laws of thermodynamics, would likely be bristling with a dizzying array of panels to radiate the excess heat generated by propulsion systems.

"Apparently"? What do you think is going to warm up your Earl Grey tea, dumass?


Actually... If you're using magnetically confined fusion jets for sub-light or maneuvering you don't need to dump heat.
 
2012-09-22 05:45:52 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: why Columbus went ashore and risked hostile natives


Um, trade? Pillage and rapine? Stuff? As opposed to a deadly, hostile barren vacuum????
 
2012-09-22 05:52:34 PM  
www.halforums.com
 
2012-09-22 05:53:13 PM  

AbbeySomeone: height="222"> 

They looked like this in the 70's.

/image hotlinked


Bingo.
 
2012-09-22 05:53:47 PM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-09-22 05:53:55 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Mean radius 6,371.0 km[6]
Equatorial radius 6,378.1 km[7][8]
Polar radius 6,356.8 km[9]
Flattening 0.0033528[10]
Circumference 40,075.017 km (equatorial)[8]
40,007.86 km (meridional)[11][12]
Surface area

510,072,000 km2[13][14][note 5] 148,940,000 km2 land (29.2 %)
361,132,000 km2 water (70.8 %)
Volume 1.08321×1012 km3[3]
Mass 5.9736×1024 kg[3]
Mean density 5.515 g/cm3[3]


Also bingo.
 
2012-09-22 05:54:02 PM  
blog.ponoko.com

Actually... since everything larger than a widget is designed by committee these days...

newsfromfrogtown.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-09-22 05:56:12 PM  
www.lazyiguana.org
 
2012-09-22 05:58:44 PM  
It would look like any other vehicle humans have created, like a giant penis substitute. At least if you believe shrinks and the like.
 
2012-09-22 05:59:43 PM  

Great Janitor: What would it look like? Well, it depends on what inertia dampeners will look like, what artificial gravity generators look like, navigational deflectors required size to operate effectively to keep dust and space crap out of the way, and the size of the faster than light engines needed as well the size needed for the hydrogen ram scoops.

And, let's face this fact: if the ship really can't travel fast enough to make the travel time from one star system to the other in a short enough amount of time, it will only have two functions: generational vessel to establish new colonies and robotic probes to explore space. And in both cases, the biggest problem is communication between colonies and space probes. The time it would take would be years. If we developed a way of communicating at the speed of light, it would take four and a half years to communicate between Earth and Alpha Centuri.

In all honesty, I believe that we should look towards finding earth like planets with no intelligent life, that could be colonized by a group of people knowing full well, that it would be a one way trip. Given the population of Earth, sending out 3 billion people or so would help the Earth. And it really wouldn't be hard to find that many people willing to go. Just tell the Christians that these planets need to be colonized in the name of Jesus and that there is no such things as Space Muslims.


Do you really want a bunch of Christians colonizing planets in the name of, and representing, mankind?
 
2012-09-22 06:04:22 PM  
it'll be a giant ring world using the Sun as a fusion drive, once it gets going the interstellar gases will be be the fuel. the only problem will be stopping, that's going to be a biatch.
 
2012-09-22 06:07:27 PM  

Ghastly: [www.halforums.com image 502x502]


That film is very unappreciated, but I guess being an 80s kids movie makes it tough with all the epic competition
 
2012-09-22 06:08:57 PM  
Wait, how would radiators work in space? They work with an atmosphere, because the heat excess energy is transferred to the air... In space, wouldn't it just continue to get hotter and hotter?
 
2012-09-22 06:10:12 PM  
t3.gstatic.com
 
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