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(CBS News)   Meet the LA traffic cop with no complaints from people he's ticketed in 20 years (unicorn he rides to work not pictured) (w/video)   (cbsnews.com) divider line 46
    More: Interesting, complaints  
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8245 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Sep 2012 at 4:16 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-22 02:35:40 AM  
Cop math
 
2012-09-22 03:35:07 AM  
Now that this has made the news, I guarantee someone will file a complaint, just to be that guy or gal who breaks his streak.
 
2012-09-22 04:22:22 AM  
This pretty much shows that the other complaints *are* valid; since a nice, respectful officer who enforces the law without be a tool, doesn't get any.
 
2012-09-22 04:25:04 AM  

croesius: Now that this has made the news, I guarantee someone will file a complaint, just to be that guy or gal who breaks his streak.


Yep.
 
2012-09-22 04:44:54 AM  
People don't resent somebody just doing their job, but they do resent Mr. or Ms. RoidRaging Why Couldn't I Be Judge Dredd.

I vote for this guy to sit at the table an decide which cops get flushed.
 
2012-09-22 04:48:16 AM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: This pretty much shows that the other complaints *are* valid; since a nice, respectful officer who enforces the law without be a tool, doesn't get any.


Yep.
 
2012-09-22 04:56:16 AM  
I wonder how this guy handles the drunk drivers he pulls over.
 
2012-09-22 04:59:15 AM  
OK, I have to ask...

Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law? In this case, a law that in this case by its nature means you were a)risking the lives of others and thus b)selfish ?

I mean, clearly this guy is patient and very nice, and this makes his day easier. But I don't see why they should be expected to treat people breaking the law like buddies.

I've been pulled over once, and genuinely didn't realize how fast I was going. I was mortified ...the guy didn't give me a ticket. (And I did deserve it)
 
2012-09-22 05:03:26 AM  

krautgeist: OK, I have to ask...

Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law? In this case, a law that in this case by its nature means you were a)risking the lives of others and thus b)selfish ?

I mean, clearly this guy is patient and very nice, and this makes his day easier. But I don't see why they should be expected to treat people breaking the law like buddies.

I've been pulled over once, and genuinely didn't realize how fast I was going. I was mortified ...the guy didn't give me a ticket. (And I did deserve it)


Oo, I can answer that!

You can be decent to people while still arresting them. Just like you can be a dick to people while NOT arresting them.

Now sometimes you have to be a dick when people won't listen the first time (or the second or third) but way too many people--cops and otherwise--are anxious to get straight to the F*CK YOU! interaction, and skip the "Sir, please exit your vehicle...Sir! Please exit your vehicle!...SIR! PLEASE! EXIT! YOUR! VEHICLE!" which makes it clear both that you tried nicely first AND proves that the Sir wasn't going to exit his vehicle anyway.
 
2012-09-22 05:03:26 AM  

krautgeist: OK, I have to ask...

Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law? In this case, a law that in this case by its nature means you were a)risking the lives of others and thus b)selfish ?

I mean, clearly this guy is patient and very nice, and this makes his day easier. But I don't see why they should be expected to treat people breaking the law like buddies.

I've been pulled over once, and genuinely didn't realize how fast I was going. I was mortified ...the guy didn't give me a ticket. (And I did deserve it)


Some people seem to think they have the right to break traffic laws. That's why they hate cops and cameras.
 
2012-09-22 05:07:39 AM  
farkityfarker:

Some people seem to think they have the right to break traffic laws. That's why they hate cops and cameras.

Nice! 9/10
 
2012-09-22 05:11:01 AM  

krautgeist: OK, I have to ask...

Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law? In this case, a law that in this case by its nature means you were a)risking the lives of others and thus b)selfish ?

I mean, clearly this guy is patient and very nice, and this makes his day easier. But I don't see why they should be expected to treat people breaking the law like buddies.

I've been pulled over once, and genuinely didn't realize how fast I was going. I was mortified ...the guy didn't give me a ticket. (And I did deserve it)


1.) A cop saying it so does *not* make you guilty. Cops should treat people respectfully because they are presumed innocent until later. I realize that, with traffic tickets, it's more about cash and the burden of innocence is effectively placed on the accused. But still....

2.) Many laws are not directly related to safety; look at the many studies on red-light cameras if you don't believe it or studies on speed limits and safety.

The idea that anyone who gets pulled over is both guilty *and* selfish/dangerous is pretty scary to me. I hope you aren't a cop.
 
2012-09-22 05:31:10 AM  
I was his equivalent at AT&T Customer Care.

People would call in pissed off and I'd throw money and politeness until they liked AT&T.
 
2012-09-22 05:34:14 AM  
Haha, I am in no way a cop. I've done enough stupid stuff in the past to have had to deal with them a few times, and although some were blunt/unfriendly I have never yet met one of these evil ones farkers like to whine about.

Fark_Guy_Rob: 1.) A cop saying it so does *not* make you guilty. Cops should treat people respectfully because they are presumed innocent until later. I realize that, with traffic tickets, it's more about cash and the burden of innocence is effectively placed on the accused. But still....


That seems a bit silly to me. You think everyone should be treated nicely until they are judged by their peers? I'm not saying they should have a licence to be a jerk. Just saying I don't see why they are expected to act super nice/friendly to someone who is clearly or obviously breaking the law.

Whatever the reason for the cameras/speed limits, it's a law. Sometimes those laws are stupid and should be fought. I lived in a community that decided on stupid traffic laws that were the bane of my existence for weeks. We had the city change the laws. I don't see what that has to do with an officer enforcing them...if you don't like the laws, fight them appropriately.
 
2012-09-22 05:39:36 AM  

krautgeist: Haha, I am in no way a cop. I've done enough stupid stuff in the past to have had to deal with them a few times, and although some were blunt/unfriendly I have never yet met one of these evil ones farkers like to whine about.


I've met one. Came to my house, said he followed my bike tracks from the scene of a crime in the snow. Told him those tracks were hours old, and I had JUST came from the other side of town in the opposite direction. But I invited him into my house, explained the situation, and then he said he still thinks it was me and has no evidence, but he'll be "keeping an eye" on me.

/My father went out after they started to leave and basically called him retarded.
 
2012-09-22 05:45:41 AM  

krautgeist: Haha, I am in no way a cop. I've done enough stupid stuff in the past to have had to deal with them a few times, and although some were blunt/unfriendly I have never yet met one of these evil ones farkers like to whine about.

Fark_Guy_Rob: 1.) A cop saying it so does *not* make you guilty. Cops should treat people respectfully because they are presumed innocent until later. I realize that, with traffic tickets, it's more about cash and the burden of innocence is effectively placed on the accused. But still....

That seems a bit silly to me. You think everyone should be treated nicely until they are judged by their peers? I'm not saying they should have a licence to be a jerk. Just saying I don't see why they are expected to act super nice/friendly to someone who is clearly or obviously breaking the law.

Whatever the reason for the cameras/speed limits, it's a law. Sometimes those laws are stupid and should be fought. I lived in a community that decided on stupid traffic laws that were the bane of my existence for weeks. We had the city change the laws. I don't see what that has to do with an officer enforcing them...if you don't like the laws, fight them appropriately.


Yeah. Cops aren't to blame for stupid laws.
 
2012-09-22 06:45:43 AM  

krautgeist: OK, I have to ask...

Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law? In this case, a law that in this case by its nature means you were a)risking the lives of others and thus b)selfish ?

I mean, clearly this guy is patient and very nice, and this makes his day easier. But I don't see why they should be expected to treat people breaking the law like buddies.


I don't think they need to treat the suspects "like buddies", but there's no reason not to be polite and professional during an encounter (and that holds true for *both* parties.) A cop stands to gain very little from becoming emotional and confrontational, beyond the level that the situation demands.

While it's true that some suspects will jump directly to "dickhead", there are many others who will take their cues from the officer's behavior, so it's in the cop's interests to at least start off the encounter adopting a non-threatening posture (while still taking officer safety into account).
 
2012-09-22 06:47:28 AM  
Problem is the police state mentality of the US. I moved to Norway where police are more like social workers--- often petite, cute, unarmed, blonde women. I once got frisked, and genuinely enjoyed it.
 
2012-09-22 06:48:12 AM  

krautgeist: OK, I have to ask...

Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law? In this case, a law that in this case by its nature means you were a)risking the lives of others and thus b)selfish ?

I mean, clearly this guy is patient and very nice, and this makes his day easier. But I don't see why they should be expected to treat people breaking the law like buddies.

I've been pulled over once, and genuinely didn't realize how fast I was going. I was mortified ...the guy didn't give me a ticket. (And I did deserve it)


They're bitter because they got their stash confiscated, man. I mean, the cops probably just took it home and smoked themselves, you know maaaan? Farkin pigs.
 
2012-09-22 07:23:04 AM  

krautgeist: OK, I have to ask...

Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law? In this case, a law that in this case by its nature means you were a)risking the lives of others and thus b)selfish ?

I mean, clearly this guy is patient and very nice, and this makes his day easier. But I don't see why they should be expected to treat people breaking the law like buddies.

I've been pulled over once, and genuinely didn't realize how fast I was going. I was mortified ...the guy didn't give me a ticket. (And I did deserve it)


Because most people, especially on a traffic stop for speeding, don't deserve being a dick to. You're only a dick with someone when you need to be.

And it's called professionalism. You're in control of the situation enough that you don't HAVE to be a dick. Even when the other person is.
 
2012-09-22 07:24:41 AM  

filter: Problem is the police state mentality of the US. I moved to Norway where police are more like social workers--- often petite, cute, unarmed, blonde women. I once got frisked, and genuinely enjoyed it.


www.binsidetv.net
 
2012-09-22 07:33:57 AM  

krautgeist: OK, I have to ask...

Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law? In this case, a law that in this case by its nature means you were a)risking the lives of others and thus b)selfish ?

I mean, clearly this guy is patient and very nice, and this makes his day easier. But I don't see why they should be expected to treat people breaking the law like buddies.

I've been pulled over once, and genuinely didn't realize how fast I was going. I was mortified ...the guy didn't give me a ticket. (And I did deserve it)


Well you should have been ticketed because you were being selfish and risked the lives of others, right?

I once got pulled over by a copy like this. I wish more of them were like this. Yeah you got me going 52 in a 45. I made a mistake. Give me the ticket and spare me the condescending lecture, asshole.
 
2012-09-22 07:44:48 AM  
If you are breaking the law then you have to expect being given a citation. What you don't expect or welcome is some angry jar-head with an anger management problem to dress you down. Give me my ticket, don't be a dick, and I will pay my stupid ticket.


Case closed.
 
2012-09-22 08:10:42 AM  
I've been a cop for a little over a year.

I've had 3 complaints filed against me. Each one was total bullshiat.

One person was somebody loitering in a back alley in the middle of the night. I politely asked him what he was doing and why was he there. He said that he worked in the building he was next to and was waiting by the back entrance to pick up cardboard for recycling, and he had an ID badge for that company. While we were talking, the back door opened up and somebody else with an ID badge wheeled out a cart of broken down boxes. I moved along, satisfied that everything was on the up-and-up.

The next day he filed a complaint saying I was acting in a threatening fashion towards him, specifically that my hand was too close to my gun holster as I was talking to him and he was afraid I was going to draw on him. Yes, I kept my hand near my holster, it was the middle of the night and I was approaching someone loitering in a back alley, I felt it prudent. I didn't draw, my hand didn't even touch my holster, but he noticed apparently, and he was upset and filed a formal complaint.

A second complaint came when I was visiting a local government building. I had been on an errand, and an irate man was hassling the security guards near the entrance, apparently upset that some request had been denied and the bureaucrat who refused it was also refusing to meet with him. I helped out the security guards, and politely asked him to calm down and leave the premises. He didn't calm down, but he stopped hassling the security guards when a cop showed up (me) and stormed out.

The next day, he filed a complaint against me, saying that I threatened him, and I claimed to be a Federal Agent (WTF), and that I brandished my gun at him (WTF, especially with other witnesses). I heard about the complaint, but I think my superiors generally disregarded it.

The last one was late one night as I was on patrol. I ended up in a conversation with a janitor at a state government office building, I'd seen him on prior patrols, and I knew he was the legitimate janitor for the place. I stopped by and checked things out for a few minutes. It was just a routine conversation, nothing really of note. Somehow, apparently, he filed a complaint against me a few days later saying that I told him I could shoot him and get away with it, or just arrest him and make up some charges and they'll stick and he'll go away to prison for a long time.

Apparently the janitor I talked to was a convicted felon on probation, and it wouldn't take much to get his probation pulled. Also, he wasn't above lying about rookie cops to try to get them in trouble.

Events like that help me understand why police officers are usually so suspicious and wary when dealing with the general public.
 
2012-09-22 08:46:19 AM  

krautgeist: Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law?


It's called being an adult. Because someone didn't stop for that red light does not mean I have the right to demean them. They are operating a vehicle therefore, typically, an adult and I treat them like one.
 
2012-09-22 08:49:47 AM  
And that is why he is still a traffic cop. Everybody else have moved onto more lucrative positions.
 
2012-09-22 09:12:56 AM  
Hm, if "authority" and "diplomacy" is now defined as "politeness" and "treat like a special snowflake" then a lot of discourse in this country makes sense.

George Orwell and H.L. Mencken would be shocked at just how right they ended up being.
 
2012-09-22 09:17:58 AM  
"I mean, Vegas or M.I.T could not give you the odds of the statistical probability of that," said Maxwell.

It wasn't probability. It was what the officer did.
 
2012-09-22 09:20:56 AM  
I've been trying to get a job in law enforcement (in a crime lab) and over the years while getting my degree, I've interned in a few law enforcement agencies.

I can tell you that yes... professionalism is a MUST! And I agree, being a dick is not really neccessary. I've seen officers being spit on, cursed at, attacked and they still were polite calling the suspect Sir or Ma'am and trying to be gentle with that person even though the person was being abusive and violent as heck to the officer.

But I can understand being a dick too. Especially in the rural areas where your back-up might be more than an hour (or more) away. It's a self preservation mechanism then. The officer tries to be tough, act tough with the thought of getting home that night.

More times than I can remember, the nices one got treated with more violence and abuse by the public than the tough ones.

No I do not condone being a dick to anyone, but I can understand how and why some folks are like that on the job.
 
2012-09-22 09:46:31 AM  

Silverstaff: I've been a cop for a little over a year.

I've had 3 complaints filed against me. Each one was total bullshiat.

One person was somebody loitering in a back alley in the middle of the night. I politely asked him what he was doing and why was he there. He said that he worked in the building he was next to and was waiting by the back entrance to pick up cardboard for recycling, and he had an ID badge for that company. While we were talking, the back door opened up and somebody else with an ID badge wheeled out a cart of broken down boxes. I moved along, satisfied that everything was on the up-and-up.

The next day he filed a complaint saying I was acting in a threatening fashion towards him, specifically that my hand was too close to my gun holster as I was talking to him and he was afraid I was going to draw on him. Yes, I kept my hand near my holster, it was the middle of the night and I was approaching someone loitering in a back alley, I felt it prudent. I didn't draw, my hand didn't even touch my holster, but he noticed apparently, and he was upset and filed a formal complaint.

A second complaint came when I was visiting a local government building. I had been on an errand, and an irate man was hassling the security guards near the entrance, apparently upset that some request had been denied and the bureaucrat who refused it was also refusing to meet with him. I helped out the security guards, and politely asked him to calm down and leave the premises. He didn't calm down, but he stopped hassling the security guards when a cop showed up (me) and stormed out.

The next day, he filed a complaint against me, saying that I threatened him, and I claimed to be a Federal Agent (WTF), and that I brandished my gun at him (WTF, especially with other witnesses). I heard about the complaint, but I think my superiors generally disregarded it.

The last one was late one night as I was on patrol. I ended up in a conversation with a janitor at a state government of ...


All three cases would have been proved bullshiat, indeed probably never happened, if all officers were fitted with video cameras that recorded their entire shift.
 
2012-09-22 09:59:30 AM  
When I've been pulled over I've always been nice and polite to the officer, because I know they are just doing their job, it's not personal.
 
2012-09-22 10:01:42 AM  
Not all cops are assholes. I was going through a small berg a few months ago and slowed to the posted 45 mph limit. As I was leaving the town, I sped back up to 65 mph. The problem was (I didn't know this) that I was still inside the town limit. Whoops! A cop. He pulled me. He was very polite and pleasant. I told him that I thought I was clear to accelerate back to highway speed. He said it is a common mistake, but that there's a school just around the next curve. He said his chief has asked the council for more signage. He wrote me a ticket, which would have been awful, since I was exceeding the limit by 20 mph. Yet, he told me that I had been pleasant and cooperative, so he downgraded the ticket. Because of this, I needed only call there city hall and give them a credit card number to pay the fine. The fine was $200, but because he had downgraded it, they were not required to report the offense to the state department of driver safety. So no points on my license and my insurance company will never know about it. He wished us a pleasant journey and teasingly told my wife to "Hep him wid dos speed limit signs, ma'am."
 
2012-09-22 10:25:05 AM  
lh6.googleusercontent.com

What an authority figure riding a unicorn to work might look like.
 
2012-09-22 10:52:55 AM  

theurbanpagan: I've been trying to get a job in law enforcement (in a crime lab) and over the years while getting my degree, I've interned in a few law enforcement agencies.

I can tell you that yes... professionalism is a MUST! And I agree, being a dick is not really neccessary. I've seen officers being spit on, cursed at, attacked and they still were polite calling the suspect Sir or Ma'am and trying to be gentle with that person even though the person was being abusive and violent as heck to the officer.

But I can understand being a dick too. Especially in the rural areas where your back-up might be more than an hour (or more) away. It's a self preservation mechanism then. The officer tries to be tough, act tough with the thought of getting home that night.

More times than I can remember, the nices one got treated with more violence and abuse by the public than the tough ones.

No I do not condone being a dick to anyone, but I can understand how and why some folks are like that on the job.


The rule that they teach and that I personally live by is decide whether or not you are going to ticket before approaching the vehicle. From that point, the person can possibly talk themselves out of but never into a ticket. That is how I can say in the first 45 seconds to the driver whether or not they are going to get a summons for what they did.

Yes, there are those times when civility runs its course and you have to switch over to asshole mode. There are officers that jump to this immediately but smart officers keep this in reserve as the last ditch effort. Why? Because you can't back down from that point. You can get a lot done standing there and talking like adults conducting our business. You jump into asshole mode and you have pretty much taken the my way-highway route.

I use that only when the situation is totally out of control and someone needs to regain order. Basically someone is just not going to listen at all, no matter what. Disorderly call at 2am to the local watering hole springs to mind. "Sir, can you just step over there for a minute while I talk with her?" doesn't work.

I was told something by a dirt old officer in the academy that I think about when I am on the verge of losing it. He said: "It's tough but try and remember: We are seeing good people in their worst moments. Treat them that way."
 
2012-09-22 11:02:47 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: theurbanpagan: I've been trying to get a job in law enforcement (in a crime lab) and over the years while getting my degree, I've interned in a few law enforcement agencies.

I can tell you that yes... professionalism is a MUST! And I agree, being a dick is not really neccessary. I've seen officers being spit on, cursed at, attacked and they still were polite calling the suspect Sir or Ma'am and trying to be gentle with that person even though the person was being abusive and violent as heck to the officer.

But I can understand being a dick too. Especially in the rural areas where your back-up might be more than an hour (or more) away. It's a self preservation mechanism then. The officer tries to be tough, act tough with the thought of getting home that night.

More times than I can remember, the nices one got treated with more violence and abuse by the public than the tough ones.

No I do not condone being a dick to anyone, but I can understand how and why some folks are like that on the job.

The rule that they teach and that I personally live by is decide whether or not you are going to ticket before approaching the vehicle. From that point, the person can possibly talk themselves out of but never into a ticket. That is how I can say in the first 45 seconds to the driver whether or not they are going to get a summons for what they did.

Yes, there are those times when civility runs its course and you have to switch over to asshole mode. There are officers that jump to this immediately but smart officers keep this in reserve as the last ditch effort. Why? Because you can't back down from that point. You can get a lot done standing there and talking like adults conducting our business. You jump into asshole mode and you have pretty much taken the my way-highway route.

I use that only when the situation is totally out of control and someone needs to regain order. Basically someone is just not going to listen at all, no matter what. Disorderly call at ...


What makes a cop decide to forego writing a ticket? What kinds of excuses work, and which ones don't?
 
2012-09-22 11:03:24 AM  
I work as a health care aide/ certified nurses aide in Canada. I've only been doing it for a year, but because my parents had lengthy stays in the hospital before they passed away, i was able to truly learn how to talk to people, and how not to talk to people.

Because of this, i usually become the patients favorite worker because they know I won't talk down to them, and I show through my actions and words that I do care.

I guess the point of my ramble is this; if you treat people with respect and compassion, the vast majority will give you the same back.

I know that all sounds hippie-ish, but it's also the truth.

I apologize if I sound full of myself. I went through a lot of trial/tribulation (some self-inflicted) before I found a career that was truly my calling. It's a great feeling to be able to help others, and get paid wellto do it, to boot.

Now if I could just find a job in health care in Michigan so I could be with my fiancé and her boys, life would be truly perfect

/cool rant bro
 
2012-09-22 11:18:22 AM  
IMHO, every single police officer should have a degree - or at least serious training - in Psychology.
 
2012-09-22 11:22:08 AM  

Silverstaff: I've been a cop for a little over a year.

I've had 3 complaints filed against me. Each one was total bullshiat.

One person was somebody loitering in a back alley in the middle of the night. I politely asked him what he was doing and why was he there. He said that he worked in the building he was next to and was waiting by the back entrance to pick up cardboard for recycling, and he had an ID badge for that company. While we were talking, the back door opened up and somebody else with an ID badge wheeled out a cart of broken down boxes. I moved along, satisfied that everything was on the up-and-up.

I just have to say something about this one..

I work night shiat and have to go into these back alleys to pick up recycling. Not the best job in the world.
So last night I'm behind store "x" waiting for the cart and I hear someone call me out of the blue!
I turn and I see this guy in a uniform with his hand by his gun like hes going to shoot me!
I'm just doing my job man! He starts interrogating me, wants to know who I am what I'm doing in the alley ect.
The whole time I'm explaining to him, his hand is just hovering over his gun, Like hes ready for a shoot out at the ok corral!
I'm thinking to myself, one wrong move, or a loud noise, and this guys going to kill me!
Eventually the recycling cart shows up with the cardboard an the cop seem satisfied.. but that whole time all I could see was his hand hovering over his gun..


- See the problem you have there Officer Silverstaff is you don't seem to be able to see things from the point of view of the other guy.

Did you do anything wrong? Probably not, but can you see why the guy might file a complaint?

 
2012-09-22 12:05:29 PM  

Gyrfalcon: krautgeist: OK, I have to ask...

Why do people think that cops need to be polite/treat them like special little snowflakes when you've just broken a law? In this case, a law that in this case by its nature means you were a)risking the lives of others and thus b)selfish ?

I mean, clearly this guy is patient and very nice, and this makes his day easier. But I don't see why they should be expected to treat people breaking the law like buddies.

I've been pulled over once, and genuinely didn't realize how fast I was going. I was mortified ...the guy didn't give me a ticket. (And I did deserve it)

Oo, I can answer that!

You can be decent to people while still arresting them. Just like you can be a dick to people while NOT arresting them.


More than that, though, the people he is ticketing are his employers, who he as sworn to serve in exchange for his union-protected career job with benefits and pension from which it is virtually impossible to be fired no matter how many complaints he generates or felonies he commits against citizens.

It's not his job to be a dick. Not in the job description, not in the training, not what we pay him for.
 
2012-09-22 01:15:26 PM  

soupafi: When I've been pulled over I've always been nice and polite to the officer, because I know they are just doing their job, it's not personal.



Exactly.  I used to speed a lot when I was younger and stupider.  Got pulled over 7 times over about 5-ish years.  Not one ticket.  I was polite.  I truly didn't know how fast I was going, but apologized for not paying attention to such.
 
And in terms of profile... I looked sorta like trouble.  Long dreadlocks, leather jacket, ripped jeans (yeah, we had a badass here.)
 
2012-09-22 01:39:26 PM  

Silverstaff: I've been a cop for a little over a year.

I've had 3 complaints filed against me. Each one was total bullshiat.

One person was somebody loitering in a back alley in the middle of the night. I politely asked him what he was doing and why was he there. He said that he worked in the building he was next to and was waiting by the back entrance to pick up cardboard for recycling, and he had an ID badge for that company. While we were talking, the back door opened up and somebody else with an ID badge wheeled out a cart of broken down boxes. I moved along, satisfied that everything was on the up-and-up.

The next day he filed a complaint saying I was acting in a threatening fashion towards him, specifically that my hand was too close to my gun holster as I was talking to him and he was afraid I was going to draw on him. Yes, I kept my hand near my holster, it was the middle of the night and I was approaching someone loitering in a back alley, I felt it prudent. I didn't draw, my hand didn't even touch my holster, but he noticed apparently, and he was upset and filed a formal complaint.

A second complaint came when I was visiting a local government building. I had been on an errand, and an irate man was hassling the security guards near the entrance, apparently upset that some request had been denied and the bureaucrat who refused it was also refusing to meet with him. I helped out the security guards, and politely asked him to calm down and leave the premises. He didn't calm down, but he stopped hassling the security guards when a cop showed up (me) and stormed out.

The next day, he filed a complaint against me, saying that I threatened him, and I claimed to be a Federal Agent (WTF), and that I brandished my gun at him (WTF, especially with other witnesses). I heard about the complaint, but I think my superiors generally disregarded it.

The last one was late one night as I was on patrol. I ended up in a conversation with a janitor at a state government of ...


Not a cool story, officer.
 
2012-09-22 01:53:05 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Silverstaff: I've been a cop for a little over a year.

I've had 3 complaints filed against me. Each one was total bullshiat.

One person was somebody loitering in a back alley in the middle of the night. I politely asked him what he was doing and why was he there. He said that he worked in the building he was next to and was waiting by the back entrance to pick up cardboard for recycling, and he had an ID badge for that company. While we were talking, the back door opened up and somebody else with an ID badge wheeled out a cart of broken down boxes. I moved along, satisfied that everything was on the up-and-up.

The next day he filed a complaint saying I was acting in a threatening fashion towards him, specifically that my hand was too close to my gun holster as I was talking to him and he was afraid I was going to draw on him. Yes, I kept my hand near my holster, it was the middle of the night and I was approaching someone loitering in a back alley, I felt it prudent. I didn't draw, my hand didn't even touch my holster, but he noticed apparently, and he was upset and filed a formal complaint.

A second complaint came when I was visiting a local government building. I had been on an errand, and an irate man was hassling the security guards near the entrance, apparently upset that some request had been denied and the bureaucrat who refused it was also refusing to meet with him. I helped out the security guards, and politely asked him to calm down and leave the premises. He didn't calm down, but he stopped hassling the security guards when a cop showed up (me) and stormed out.

The next day, he filed a complaint against me, saying that I threatened him, and I claimed to be a Federal Agent (WTF), and that I brandished my gun at him (WTF, especially with other witnesses). I heard about the complaint, but I think my superiors generally disregarded it.

The last one was late one night as I was on patrol. I ended up in a conversation with a janitor at a state ...


They do this with London cops on foot patrol, little cameras on their shoulder or hat. Aside from the general prevalence of cameras in Britain it's a good idea.
 
2012-09-22 03:42:15 PM  
"They're excuse is..." THEY'RE excuse??? THEY ARE EXCUSE?! Did this piss anyone else off? Freakin' journalism these days...
 
2012-09-22 08:32:08 PM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: I was told something by a dirt old officer in the academy that I think about when I am on the verge of losing it. He said: "It's tough but try and remember: We are seeing good people in their worst moments. Treat them that way."


I was told this as well. It's wise words to live by.
 
2012-09-23 03:04:32 PM  

theurbanpagan: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: I was told something by a dirt old officer in the academy that I think about when I am on the verge of losing it. He said: "It's tough but try and remember: We are seeing good people in their worst moments. Treat them that way."

I was told this as well. It's wise words to live by.

Agrees

 
2012-09-23 05:43:30 PM  

fugeeface: theurbanpagan: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: I was told something by a dirt old officer in the academy that I think about when I am on the verge of losing it. He said: "It's tough but try and remember: We are seeing good people in their worst moments. Treat them that way."

I was told this as well. It's wise words to live by.

Agrees


I have seen that so many times. The fact that he never asked for a second unit shocks me. That guy was unhinged...
 
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