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(MSNBC)   Researchers translate ancient Egyptian language. The first sentence that was decoded - "Why is everyone walking that way?"   (msnbc.msn.com) divider line 30
    More: Interesting, Egyptian, Demotic, Egyptologists, Rosetta Stone  
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2938 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Sep 2012 at 6:52 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-21 05:19:39 AM
georgesjournal.files.wordpress.com

Why Egyptians might walk funny
 
2012-09-21 05:46:22 AM

mr_a: [georgesjournal.files.wordpress.com image 456x476]

Why Egyptians might walk funny


I thought it was all the bangles they wore.
 
2012-09-21 05:52:33 AM
Interesting, but call me when they figure out Linear A
 
2012-09-21 06:54:44 AM
Researchers 5-fecta now in play?
 
2012-09-21 07:00:50 AM
markwatches.net
 
2012-09-21 07:08:17 AM
Researchers translate ancient Egyptian language. The first sentence that was decoded - "Why is everyone walking that way?

I thought you wanted to....

\There, wolf!
 
2012-09-21 07:08:33 AM

mr_a: [georgesjournal.files.wordpress.com image 456x476]

Why Egyptians might walk funny


Now I'm sorry I already fapped.
 
rpl
2012-09-21 07:19:48 AM
www.csicon.org
 
2012-09-21 07:26:32 AM
"Be sure to drink your beer bread"? A crummy commercial? Son of a biatch!
 
2012-09-21 07:41:56 AM

dittybopper: "Be sure to drink your beer bread"? A crummy commercial? Son of a biatch!


www.keyflux.com

"I like the cut of your jib, kid."
 
2012-09-21 07:47:23 AM
They found a cartouche near the Stargate?
 
2012-09-21 08:06:00 AM
www.starscolor.com
1.bp.blogspot.com

/ still hawt after all these years
 
2012-09-21 08:12:14 AM

DjangoStonereaver: dittybopper: "Be sure to drink your beer bread"? A crummy commercial? Son of a biatch!

[www.keyflux.com image 259x271]

"I like the cut of your jib, kid."


Shep was a famous ham radio operator. His callsign was K2ORS
 
2012-09-21 08:32:15 AM
Apparently, Shep was also a big CW guy.

/CW = Morse Code.
 
2012-09-21 08:38:56 AM

dittybopper: Apparently, Shep was also a big CW guy.

/CW = Morse Code.


NPR's extended tribute/eulogy for him, "A VOICE IN THE NIGHT" has a vintage monologue where he
goes through his experiences at the Fort Monmouth Code Training school in (what I presume was) the
early 50s, before he got into commercial broadcasting. What little I know of the CW comes from
my repeated listenings to that bit.

You can listen to it here; the bit starts at about 28 minutes in, but I'm sure you'll love to hear the whole
thing, since they did a damn fine job of culling together air checks that are otherwise lost to the
aether.
 
2012-09-21 08:48:05 AM

mr_a: [georgesjournal.files.wordpress.com image 456x476]

Why Egyptians might walk funny


Siphilis?
 
2012-09-21 09:26:33 AM
images2.wikia.nocookie.net

Did they translate this yet?
 
2012-09-21 10:26:14 AM
Yo ye pharaohs! Let us walk through this barren desert in search of truth, and some pointy boots!

www.tabfox.com
 
2012-09-21 10:29:41 AM
It's because it was just another manic Monday.
 
2012-09-21 10:33:40 AM

DjangoStonereaver: You can listen to it here; the bit starts at about 28 minutes in, but I'm sure you'll love to hear the whole
thing, since they did a damn fine job of culling together air checks that are otherwise lost to the
aether.


Freakin' *HILARIOUS*. It reminded me of my time at Fort Devens, which is where the potential dittyboppers went. Apparently, Fort Monmouth was where they sent you to learn Morse if you were destined to become a radio operator, but Fort Devens is where they sent you to learn it if you were to become a Morse interceptor.

Oddly enough, I *ALMOST* went to Fort Monmouth instead of Devens: I was tested in Basic Training and told that I could probably get a slot at the USMAPS, a prep school for those headed to West Point, if I decided to apply. I hemmed and hawed a while about whether I wanted to. My SAT scores were good enough, even if my grades weren't spectacular (which is probably why they mentioned the prep school option). Certainly, half-way through Basic, I was in fit enough shape. The one thing that stopped me was the potential time: I had signed up for 4 years active duty, and if I went through with it I would be looking at a minimum of 10 years active duty (1 year USMAPS, 4 years USMA, 5 years as an officer before I could resign my commission).

That wasn't all that attractive to me. I had no idea if the Army was something I wanted to commit that much time to.

So, like that song by Rush, I made the choice by choosing not to decide. I graduated from Basic, standing tall in my Class B's, birth control glasses, c-word cap and all. After a very few short days of "transit time", that I mainly spent at my parents house, I took the bus from Bennington, VT, out to Fort Devens. I arrived on Friday the 13th of September, and signed in at the United States Army Intelligence School at 13:13 local time.

Figures.

Despite my prowess with code *NOW*, I was generally "behind" at Devens. While the school there was a 'learn at your own pace' sort-of deal, there was a limit: Roughly half of the students never completed the school, and got reassigned to other MOS's. That almost happened to me, but apparently I was able to bullshiat the SGM of the school well enough that I got a "waiver" to continue on to the classified portion, not having yet passed the 20 wpm requirement. Luckily, I managed to eventually pass 20 wpm.

BTW, Shep talks about copying 45 or 50 wpm Morse, which is possible for short exchanges of natural language, but it's *NOT* generally possible with random code groups, which is the sort of thing they taught you to copy at Fort Devens. You just can't copy every single last dit fast enough that way. I've seen guys barely keep up with 30 wpm random stuff, but that seems to be near the limit. Like Shep says, you can hear whole words when copying fast, but you can't do that when you're copying stuff like "XWUIG CULHA BQQIR MXREM". The brain just can't process that.

To give you an idea how tough it is, we had to pass 20 wpm at a 97% accuracy rate. Now, if you didn't copy the character but only put a "place holder" there, it counted as only 1 against you, so out of every 100 characters, you could get 3 of those and still pass. If you put the *WRONG* character down, it counted as *2* wrong, so if you did that just twice in 100 characters, you failed. Twenty words per minute is about 100 characters a minute, as the standard "word" for measuring code speed is "PARIS", which is 5 characters long.

Now, there were plenty of people I knew who got to 12, 13, 14, or even 15 wpm before hitting that "plateau" that they just couldn't get past. Generally, the instructors would program your console to send at 1 or 2 wpm faster than you passed, but to get you past a plateau they'd set it faster, so that when they dropped it back to the speed you were trying to pass, it sounded slow. Oddly enough, that worked more often than not, but there were some for whom it was just hopeless. I commiserated with them a lot, because if you "behind" you had to do remedial training in the evening. The instructors would schedule you for extra training usually for an hour or so between 19:00 and whenever they wanted to go home, usually 20:00, but I had been there as late as 21:00.

Anyway, at the time, if you failed out of dittybopper school, they were apparently sending you to be a POL specialist. POL stands for "Petroleum Oil Lubricant". Essentially, you became a glorified gas station attendant. That was a *MAJOR* incentive to pass the code. Truthfully, too, the Army wanted you to pass if at all possible: There was a major investment in time and money involved in getting you a top secret security clearance, and there just weren't enough slots in the non-Morse SIGINT fields to handle all the drop-outs, so every drop-out that went into a non-classified MOS represented a serious waste of resources. 

Still, half of us dropped out. That's probably one of the highest non-Special Operations MOS drop-out rates. I consider myself to be among an elite group of brain damaged, drunken assholes who went around yelling "Didahdidit, to *HELL* with it".

Oh, and I dig ancient Egypt shiat, too.
 
2012-09-21 10:36:17 AM
Because you ain't seen nothin' till you're down on a muffin.
 
2012-09-21 11:03:38 AM
It was instructions on how to open the stargate.
 
2012-09-21 11:23:13 AM

dittybopper: c-word cap


God almighty.

I haven't heard anyone call a 'garrison cap' that since my father passed on, God rest him.

Glad you enjoyed it; there is a 2nd part, but the Fort Monmouth story is the best of the show.
 
2012-09-21 11:44:18 AM

DjangoStonereaver: dittybopper: c-word cap

God almighty.

I haven't heard anyone call a 'garrison cap' that since my father passed on, God rest him.

Glad you enjoyed it; there is a 2nd part, but the Fort Monmouth story is the best of the show.


It's about the dorkiest military headgear *EVAR*, outside of the beret. Only actual bad-ass elite troops should wear the same headgear as Girl Scouts. Getting rid of the brimmed fatigue cap was a mistake of the first order, as it was *PRACTICAL* headgear. The brim kept water from hitting your face in a rain, something actually important to those of us who wear glasses, and it also provided shade for the eyes in sunlight.

Oh, and to put this back on track, here is a proper version of "Walk like an Egyptian". NSFW, probably.
 
2012-09-21 11:45:41 AM
Oh, and I was Shepping, but obviously I've not got the story telling talent of Shep.
 
2012-09-21 12:21:07 PM

GendoIkari: [images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 640x1099]

Did they translate this yet?


Yes, all it said was "CRAP"
 
2012-09-21 12:45:25 PM

ShadowLAnCeR: GendoIkari: [images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 640x1099]

Did they translate this yet?

Yes, all it said was "CRAP"


That's because it's not Scottish.
 
2012-09-21 03:33:20 PM
"If I could walk that way I wouldn't need aftershave..."
 
2012-09-21 05:12:43 PM
thilllogistics.com
 
2012-09-22 02:35:09 AM

mr_a: [georgesjournal.files.wordpress.com image 456x476]

Why Egyptians might walk funny


As a life-long student of history this article interesed me and...
 
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