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(io9)   Examples of what the future has in store for radical body modification - aka - what your offspring will do to piss you off   (io9.com) divider line 9
    More: Interesting, adaptations, technophiles, RFID, offspring, subcultures, id numbers, Mains electricity, inductive charging  
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6529 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Sep 2012 at 6:13 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-09-21 03:01:42 AM
2 votes:

TheOmni: jimmyego: TheOmni: I really do want to get the magnet in the fingertip mod.

Wouldn't that be asking for trouble when handling digital media?

Short answer, nope.

Long answer, the magnet is really pretty weak. Because it is sitting inside your finger it doesn't actually need to be that strong. It can be damaging to older magnetic media (floppy disks, cassette tapes), but anything you would possibly use today (including hard disk drives) wouldn't be affected. The implants aren't even strong enough to harm a credit card stripe.


Thanks, that was my concern, appreciate the reply.

However, I want proper body mods:

i.imgur.com
2012-09-21 07:42:12 PM
1 votes:

albuquerquehalsey: TheOmni: I really do want to get the magnet in the fingertip mod.

No you don't. Get one of these. [img.alibaba.com image 500x500] Having a moving piece of metal in one of your fingers is dumb and you are dumb for considering it.


Aww, it's ok. Don't worry, try not to panic. The future is coming and people are going to be able to and want to do things that you probably don't understand. You can stay where you are. You can join in. You can be who you like. You have plenty of choices, you don't need to be scared.
2012-09-21 02:49:00 PM
1 votes:
(a single double-D breast implant has more volume than many laptop computers at this point)

With that much space at your disposal, you could have a few terabyte of mammary.
2012-09-21 08:41:31 AM
1 votes:
Did he interview JC Denton?
2012-09-21 08:41:15 AM
1 votes:
I'm Andrew Ryan and I approve this message

www.esplatter.com
2012-09-21 07:59:39 AM
1 votes:

Lukeonia1: His talk of having magnets implanted in his fingertips is intriguing, to the point I might even consider it. However, it seems like it's just asking for trouble while trying to use handheld electronic devices. And let's not even talk about the horrific images that come to mind when thinking of getting an MRI with them in.


You obviously could not have an MRI done with them, but they can be removed. And have to be anyway at some point, because all passive magnets eventually wear down; this was not explained in TFA, but has been elsewhere. The catch with it is the same as all other senses: it's there all the time, whether you want it to be or not. That's the thing about body modification: The one thing we've always got with us is our bodies, so whatever you do to that, you've got it with you all the time. They can also be hard to repair, and are so far impossible to replace.

This is what I think when I look at all the tattoos hipsters have. They look fine on young people, but they probably won't look as awesome when you're 80. (Or maybe they will; I shouldn't make too many assumptions.) But they're easier to remove now than they used to be, so it's probably moot. Piercings, though, are usually self-healing: remove the appliance, and the hole eventually closes over. (Except really big ones, like ear loops. But ears are funny anyway, and I wonder if everyone having ear work done knows that ears can be permanently distorted, irreparable short of plastic surgery.)

On a strictly aesthetic level, I find a lot of radical body modification hideous to look at. BUT -- and I really want to make this point -- that's entirely apart from what I think of modification generally, or what I think of those who do it. I take a generally Heinleinesque view of such things, which is to say that I'm culturally libertarian: What you choose to do is entirely up to you, not for me to judge, and I will judge you only by your character and what I perceive as the motive for your actions, observing only practical restrictions. (E.g., please follow health guidelines, but I don't care what your clothes look like.) I do NOT observe or respect cultural 'norms,' as I find them arbitrary and largely asinine. I wouldn't care if the clerk at the gas station is 400 lbs., buck nekkid, and has a zillion tats and piercings; if they're polite to me and make correct change, that's all I feel I have a right to ask or expect from anyone.

With that, it seems to me that the largest part of this discussion is over what people think, and my question for that is, "What part of that matters, and why?"
2012-09-21 02:27:55 AM
1 votes:
ih0.redbubble.net
2012-09-21 01:06:33 AM
1 votes:

Lukeonia1: hubiestubert: "IT'S ALL A COMMIE TERRIST PLOT!"

FTFY. Now get off my Nev-R-Mow® bioengineered yard turf!


To be fair, I'm going to be the old man in the nursing home asking for them to bring up my Ministry and Black Flag because I can't hear it so well...

Yeah. Nursing homes are going to be werrrrry interesting in another thirty or forty years...
2012-09-21 12:27:53 AM
1 votes:
It's true. Each generation talks about how they are more open than the previous one but still go along hating whatever they aren't used to. I mentioned these body modifications 10 years ago and everyone got grossed out by them, and furthermore said they wouldn't let their kids have these things. Even though they had body mods that their parents hated. Just recognize the formula and deal with it.

/I want glowing electronics under my skin, printable organs and genetic expression modification.
 
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