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(io9)   Examples of what the future has in store for radical body modification - aka - what your offspring will do to piss you off   (io9.com) divider line 72
    More: Interesting, adaptations, technophiles, RFID, offspring, subcultures, id numbers, Mains electricity, inductive charging  
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6527 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Sep 2012 at 6:13 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-21 02:03:58 PM

TheOmni: I really do want to get the magnet in the fingertip mod.


Me too, but aside from the MRI problem, there's one thing keeping me from doing it: I'm pretty sure I know exactly what the implantation would feel like; and I'm afraid it would be a repeat of the single worst pain I've ever experienced.

Several years ago, I suffered an accident involving a VERY sharp pocket knife and my pinkie finger. The knife was basically scalpel-sharp and had partially opened in my pocket. The blade protruded through the pocket of my jeans and when I went to hike a bag up onto my shoulder I sliced my left pinkie finger pretty much directly down the midline (palm side), from the joint of the first knuckle to the tip. That sort of hurt. As I say, the blade was very sharp, so it was a very clean single slash - not ragged or anything, but a bit deep. Went to urgent care and informed them that I was quite concerned about the injury because I play guitar and didn't want to lose sensitivity or use of that joint. Fortunately, the Doc on call at the urgent care clinic on a Sunday morning in Vegas just happened to be experienced in hand surgery. He did an expert repair of the finger with five or six VERY small micro-sutures. What I'm leaving out is the actual procedure: By far, the absolute worst pain I've ever experienced in my entire life was the injection of the local anesthetic into the fingertip. Like a dental local, you have to inject a small amount in multiple places around the wound. OH MY DEITY, did that ever hurt. I've been burned, lacerated, perforated (stabbed), abraded (road rash), and just about every other localized minor injury you can sustain short of being shot, and that friggen series of injections was the worst.

Side note: It took about four years to regain full "normal" sensitivity in the finger pad around the injury. There was always a sense of touch, but it was dampened or altered somehow for many years. I've heard similar from other people with such scar formation - apparently the brain needs to re-map or something.
 
2012-09-21 02:49:00 PM
(a single double-D breast implant has more volume than many laptop computers at this point)

With that much space at your disposal, you could have a few terabyte of mammary.
 
2012-09-21 02:58:19 PM

ProfessorOhki: (a single double-D breast implant has more volume than many laptop computers at this point)

With that much space at your disposal, you could have a few terabyte of mammary.


and you can usually use the implants to get more ram
 
2012-09-21 04:36:18 PM
uwbcsp.com

Approves
 
2012-09-21 04:38:22 PM

Herbie555: TheOmni: I really do want to get the magnet in the fingertip mod.

......scar formatio ...


Dude. I had my left forefinger severedust at the knucke closest to the hand. I had been drinking, and it was a freak accident in a bar fight that caused it. Fortunately, there was a microsurgeon on duty that nite.
this was near Penn State main campus.
He had custom built Spanish Optics and everythign he needed to reattach it. And I told him if he did it right, I would come back to play mandolyn for the kids in the children's ward for Christmas eve.
He couldn't give me any thing for the pain, and saved the nerve for last.
He reattached the nerve. *twitch while typing* and THAT was the most interesting pain I have ever felt.

Anyway, I did the therapy, learned how to play guitar, and mandolyn, and learned every christmas carol on the two of them. Went back a decade later and did it.
He was still there.
And impressed.
 
2012-09-21 05:28:45 PM

vudukungfu:
He reattached the nerve. *twitch while typing* and THAT was the most interesting pain I have ever felt.

Anyway, I did the therapy, learned how to play guitar, and mandolyn, and learned every christmas carol on the two of them. Went back a decade later and did it.
He was still there.
And impressed.


Agh! Just had my own twitches reading that. Glad you made a recovery!
 
2012-09-21 05:32:50 PM

you have pee hands: brianbankerus: What other downsides could it have? I'm seriously interested in this strange idea.

You'll constantly get locked out of hotel rooms because you'll deprogram your key every time you touch it.


Nope. Read a FAQ from a guy who has one. He said he tried to deprogram a credit card with it and couldn't do it no matter how much he played with it, rubbing it specifically across the magnetic area. So nope, not that.

Even read that someone has had an MRI with it in without issue. Hey, MRIs don't pull the fillings out of your head. Maybe this is not so different.
 
2012-09-21 06:20:50 PM

TheOmni: I really do want to get the magnet in the fingertip mod.


No you don't. Get one of these. img.alibaba.com Having a moving piece of metal in one of your fingers is dumb and you are dumb for considering it.
 
2012-09-21 07:42:12 PM

albuquerquehalsey: TheOmni: I really do want to get the magnet in the fingertip mod.

No you don't. Get one of these. [img.alibaba.com image 500x500] Having a moving piece of metal in one of your fingers is dumb and you are dumb for considering it.


Aww, it's ok. Don't worry, try not to panic. The future is coming and people are going to be able to and want to do things that you probably don't understand. You can stay where you are. You can join in. You can be who you like. You have plenty of choices, you don't need to be scared.
 
2012-09-21 08:45:46 PM

brianbankerus: you have pee hands: brianbankerus: What other downsides could it have? I'm seriously interested in this strange idea.

You'll constantly get locked out of hotel rooms because you'll deprogram your key every time you touch it.

Nope. Read a FAQ from a guy who has one. He said he tried to deprogram a credit card with it and couldn't do it no matter how much he played with it, rubbing it specifically across the magnetic area. So nope, not that.

Even read that someone has had an MRI with it in without issue. Hey, MRIs don't pull the fillings out of your head. Maybe this is not so different.


Dental fillings are gold, amalgam, ceramic, etc. (lead if you want to go back in time a few hundred years). None of those are magnetic.
 
2012-09-21 09:44:49 PM
I'd probably go all the way, leaving only the brain, but full body mod for the rest of the body.

/Unlike the guy from Human Revolution
//I'll ask for it
 
2012-09-22 04:15:08 PM
nascent sub-culture of biohackers would be a great name for a band.
 
2012-09-23 10:44:03 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: This is what I think when I look at all the tattoos hipsters have. They look fine on young people, but they probably won't look as awesome when you're 80. (Or maybe they will; I shouldn't make too many assumptions.)


This is one of those things that I never get. Have you seen actually> tattooed old people? Not granny that got the one shiatty rose done by her sorority sister. I mean grandpa, who spent his youth doing god-knows-what around the world and has crazy-ass, unidentifiable tattoos to prove it. Those type of elderly people tend to be awesome, in more ways than one.

Also, if you're concerned with how you're going to look at 80, you're already missing a few points.
 
2012-09-23 10:44:43 AM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: This is what I think when I look at all the tattoos hipsters have. They look fine on young people, but they probably won't look as awesome when you're 80. (Or maybe they will; I shouldn't make too many assumptions.)


This is one of those things that I never get. Have you seen actually tattooed old people? Not granny that got the one shiatty rose done by her sorority sister. I mean grandpa, who spent his youth doing god-knows-what around the world and has crazy-ass, unidentifiable tattoos to prove it. Those type of elderly people tend to be awesome, in more ways than one.

Also, if you're concerned with how you're going to look at 80, you're already missing a few points.
 
2012-09-23 12:33:35 PM

Summercat: I first asked.about.this two decades ago...

Also, waiting on implantable tail. I've got phantom limb syndrome here.


I've gotta say, that would be mad cool. Since tails are part of our genetic heritage, a very small number of people are still born with them once in a great while. Of course they're hacked off as soon as possible, so we've never found out if they'd work, or how. Makes me kind of sad. But to the extent that working prosthetics can be fashioned, I feel sure that we retain the brain wiring to use them, and it would be a much more interesting world if some people had them. I wish you well.
 
2012-09-23 12:37:10 PM

you have pee hands: brianbankerus: What other downsides could it have? I'm seriously interested in this strange idea.

You'll constantly get locked out of hotel rooms because you'll deprogram your key every time you touch it.


I doubt it. These are *not* the kinds of magnets used to stick tiny plastic pieces of fruit to refrigerators. I mean, they are the same in that they're small passive magnets, but theyr'e *much* smaller and weaker, and I seriously doubt they're powerful enough to do anything like mess up a hotel keycard.
 
2012-09-23 12:44:18 PM

Summercat: whosits_112: Summercat: I first asked.about.this two decades ago...

Also, waiting on implantable tail. I've got phantom limb syndrome here.

Oh lord. Just what we need. Furries modding themselves out with tails, claws, cat ears, etc. Guess what? We're not hiring, Lion-O!

'cept I already has a job, and if push comes to shove, can get off my lazy ass and work jobs where they don't care about stuff like that :3


I hope I live long enough to see a world where a majority of people are grown up enough to know the difference between appearance and substance. If I were in a hiring position, I'd happily hire any compentent and reliable person, no matter what they looked like. In fact, I'd be happy to hire the freaks, because conformists irritate me.
 
2012-09-23 12:47:25 PM

Summercat: whosits_112: Summercat: whosits_112: Summercat: I first asked.about.this two decades ago...

Also, waiting on implantable tail. I've got phantom limb syndrome here.

Oh lord. Just what we need. Furries modding themselves out with tails, claws, cat ears, etc. Guess what? We're not hiring, Lion-O!

'cept I already has a job, and if push comes to shove, can get off my lazy ass and work jobs where they don't care about stuff like that :3

I think we should keep the "I'm an animal trapped in a human body" thing to where it belongs: FantasyLand.

Have fun agreeing with all the fundies then :)


As a human being, I'd just like to say that I very definitely am an animal in a human body. And because I have a human brain, I could conceivably be any or several different kinds of human animal.
 
2012-09-23 12:52:19 PM

Herbie555: TheOmni: I really do want to get the magnet in the fingertip mod.

Me too, but aside from the MRI problem, there's one thing keeping me from doing it: I'm pretty sure I know exactly what the implantation would feel like; and I'm afraid it would be a repeat of the single worst pain I've ever experienced.

Several years ago, I suffered an accident involving a VERY sharp pocket knife and my pinkie finger. The knife was basically scalpel-sharp and had partially opened in my pocket. The blade protruded through the pocket of my jeans and when I went to hike a bag up onto my shoulder I sliced my left pinkie finger pretty much directly down the midline (palm side), from the joint of the first knuckle to the tip. That sort of hurt. As I say, the blade was very sharp, so it was a very clean single slash - not ragged or anything, but a bit deep. Went to urgent care and informed them that I was quite concerned about the injury because I play guitar and didn't want to lose sensitivity or use of that joint. Fortunately, the Doc on call at the urgent care clinic on a Sunday morning in Vegas just happened to be experienced in hand surgery. He did an expert repair of the finger with five or six VERY small micro-sutures. What I'm leaving out is the actual procedure: By far, the absolute worst pain I've ever experienced in my entire life was the injection of the local anesthetic into the fingertip. Like a dental local, you have to inject a small amount in multiple places around the wound. OH MY DEITY, did that ever hurt. I've been burned, lacerated, perforated (stabbed), abraded (road rash), and just about every other localized minor injury you can sustain short of being shot, and that friggen series of injections was the worst.

Side note: It took about four years to regain full "normal" sensitivity in the finger pad around the injury. There was always a sense of touch, but it was dampened or altered somehow for many years. I've heard similar from other people with such ...


I appreciate your concern, but I don't think it would be like that. When you had this procedure done, the area being anaesthetised was already in a state of trauma and inflammation, and therefore much more susceptible to additional insult. In the case of a healthy and undamaged finger, it doesn't have to be like that. Not the least because there's more that can be done, including things that perhaps could have been done but were not for some reason. For example, a topical analgesic can help to reduce the sensation at the injection site.

If this is the big obstacle for you, then I'd suggest discussing it with a qualified professional, telling them the same story you just did. I can't help but believe that this doesn't need to the deal killer for you.
 
2012-09-23 12:55:00 PM

brianbankerus: you have pee hands: brianbankerus: What other downsides could it have? I'm seriously interested in this strange idea.

You'll constantly get locked out of hotel rooms because you'll deprogram your key every time you touch it.

Nope. Read a FAQ from a guy who has one. He said he tried to deprogram a credit card with it and couldn't do it no matter how much he played with it, rubbing it specifically across the magnetic area. So nope, not that.

Even read that someone has had an MRI with it in without issue. Hey, MRIs don't pull the fillings out of your head. Maybe this is not so different.


Well, MRIs only affect ferromagnetic materials. I'm not sure what's in modern filling amalgams, but it might not be magnetic.
 
2012-09-23 01:08:38 PM

OniExpress: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: This is what I think when I look at all the tattoos hipsters have. They look fine on young people, but they probably won't look as awesome when you're 80. (Or maybe they will; I shouldn't make too many assumptions.)

This is one of those things that I never get. Have you seen actually> tattooed old people? Not granny that got the one shiatty rose done by her sorority sister. I mean grandpa, who spent his youth doing god-knows-what around the world and has crazy-ass, unidentifiable tattoos to prove it. Those type of elderly people tend to be awesome, in more ways than one.

Also, if you're concerned with how you're going to look at 80, you're already missing a few points.


You're right, and that's the flipside to what I confess is a bit of kneejerk reaction. It really follows from my wondering if a lot of the young people I see have considered it themselves. And it also follows from a realisation that the human body tends to slump and crinkle with age, which can't help but change the appearance of tattoos. Yet as you astutely point out, that doesn't necessarily imply anything at all about how those same people or those around them will experience it decades from now, and so you're absolutely right that it's of little value for me to speculate on it. I would say, I guess, that the questions are what interest me, a good deal more than any answers that might be available, because they can lead to this kind of dialogue.

In my father's generation, "ladies" did not get tattoos, and most men did not either, other than sailors. (No one ever told me, but I always assumed that that orignated many years ago from a fear of one's body turning up and not being identified.) By my own parents' generation, it became more common for counterculture folks such as bikers and some hippies. My generation was the one that introduced strictly decorative tattoos -- that is, ones that did not necessarily attach to a person's lifestyle or livilihood, though most of them did. (Sadly, this includes breast tigers and tramp stamps. We apologise.) The generation after ours introduced the concept of tattoo as accessory, and that's been very interesting to watch. It's party been made possible by advances in tattoo removal, since my generation grew up with the understanding that tattoos are forever, and that's no longer true.

I'm getting off the rails here, as I do, but I wanted to say that you're right, my remark echoes some outdated thinking that really doesn't have much relevance anymore. I should have though it through better before posting it. It's all the more embarrasing because it clashes with my philosophy that the world is interesting when people do interesting things, and there's no reason that nursing homes shouldn't be interesting places with plenty of fodder to spark interesting conversation.
 
2012-09-23 01:09:48 PM

OniExpress: Also, if you're concerned with how you're going to look at 80, you're already missing a few points.


Right you are. That's a bit of real wisdom there.
 
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