If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BBC)   Twelve years ago this guy turned his home into a public library. If he did it today he'd only have 2,000 copies of Twilight and 50 Shades of Grey   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 54
    More: Cool, national library, Hernando Guanlao, fashion magazines, Gospel of John  
•       •       •

6082 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Sep 2012 at 9:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



54 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-09-20 06:34:55 AM
So I've worked in libraries for seven years, earned my masters and administered hundreds of thousands of dollars in acquisitions budgets. This guy is a far better librarian than I'll ever be.
 
2012-09-20 08:03:00 AM
That's a library? Where do the homeless people masturbate?
 
2012-09-20 08:21:33 AM

Sybarite: That's a library? Where do the homeless people masturbate?


No, have an apartment.
 
2012-09-20 08:32:57 AM
"If he did it today he'd only have 2,000 copies of Twilight and 50 Shades of Grey"

So he'd have 2,000 copies of the same book?
 
2012-09-20 08:55:50 AM

ms_lara_croft: "If he did it today he'd only have 2,000 copies of Twilight and 50 Shades of Grey"

So he'd have 2,000 copies of the same book?


No, no, one is about female submission to and desire of man flesh, the other is middle-aged woman porn.

Wait, no, reverse that.
 
2012-09-20 09:16:04 AM
Hero tag is currently thumbing through a pristine copy of War And Peace.
 
2012-09-20 09:32:52 AM
Y'know

I've got a fairly decent collection of scifi and fantasy books, ranging from the 1940s up til today (atlhough I started buying ebooks recently. I'm impatient and bookstores are hard for me to get to at the moment)...

I'd never want to get rid of any of them, but if I had to I'd inquire about sending them somewhere like this place.
 
2012-09-20 09:44:20 AM
Of course this was not in Amurika. The entitled would have cleaned him out in a day here.
 
2012-09-20 09:45:06 AM
We have had a few places like this in our area, and unfortunately, they have closed. Mostly due to the investment of time, and lack of donations I would assume. If you can find one of these places near you, I highly recommend supporting them.
 
2012-09-20 09:46:33 AM
Is that 50 copies of "Shades of Grey"?

/ hate books start off with numbers
 
2012-09-20 09:47:44 AM
I like this guy. This is farking awesome
 
2012-09-20 09:48:50 AM
Sybarite Smartest
Funniest
2012-09-20 08:03:00 AM


That's a library? Where do the homeless people masturbate?


In San Francisco? Apparently anywhere. It's fun to be walking to work in the morning, half asleep and waiting for the caffiene to kick in, not wanting to breathe in too much urine soaked laden air and as you pass an alley you are treated to a full view of the friendly neighborhood hobo with his pants down pleasuring his john thomas.

Neat library. English language books (unless they are local prints or copies) are much more expensive in the East Asian countries I've visited. I can't imagine how the poor or even the "middle class" can afford such items. Although I guess that's less of an issue with the internet nowadays.
 
2012-09-20 09:48:51 AM
I have a metric fark-ton of children's books I can't get rid of. I've called Goodwill, schools, preschools, women's shelters, Half-Price Books, yard sales. NO ONE wants them. Good condition, some new condition. I simply can't give them away.

But if I hollow them out and make a craft project out of them, the internet will have my head!

But I'm not kidding, I wish I could get rid of them but I can't simply throw them away!

/not classic, just an assortment of children's books from age 1-10
//no, I won't pay to mail them to YOU
 
2012-09-20 09:49:21 AM
I'm married to a librarian. I think this man is all she aspires to become. can't wait to show her the article when I'm done at work.
...
considering how many books we have in our modest apartment I'm also wondering if we shouldn't try something similar and just hope for more thieves x|
 
2012-09-20 09:50:59 AM
And owe 11 trillion on a copyright infringement beef when somoeone overheard him playing a Journey CD on the premises.
 
2012-09-20 09:51:54 AM

Sybarite: That's a library? Where do the homeless people masturbate?


The Library Policeman doesn't need to masturbate
 
2012-09-20 10:05:55 AM
Ohhh, I expect the Book Industry of America will send their hounds out for him pretty soon now. Sharing copyrighted works. For free. The horror. The poor starving writers.
 
2012-09-20 10:20:07 AM
Pfffft. If you tried that in the US, you'd get fined into eternal debt by the governmental agencies which you just went in to competition with.
 
2012-09-20 10:20:59 AM
This man is a God damned hero.

//CSB Time: When my local library has a book sale, someone ALWAYS pulls up in a van and loads up about 80% of what's on offer and drives off. Then, about an hour later, you will find ALL of those books in the dumpster behind the awesome used book store downtown. Because they won't buy library books. This happens EVERY TIME. Jesus Christ.
 
2012-09-20 10:27:10 AM
This is wise and good.

The trouble with books is that they cost almost nothing (at least to us "rich" people) and pile up forever. Even a mass market paperback that once sold for 35 cents or a shilling is probably still kicking around making life difficult for us book hoarder types.

The fraction of a book's price that is material (paper) and production is low. A $40 hardcover costs about $2.00 to make, paper is sold by the ton.

I am increasingly annoyed and shamed by the number of books I have but I find it very hard to part with them, even knowing that I could not possibly re-read all of them, or even all of the best books. The lending library scheme is great--even public libraries promote reading so well that they do not cut into the profits of book-sellers. In fact, the local second-hand dealers often buy books from the public library's fund-raising bookstore (one I know calls it his "bookstore") and donate books to libraries when they can't sell them.

A major book dealer here threw away 30 boxes of books when he moved--not trashy paperbacks but good quality library editions because it wasn't worth his trouble to move them.

Books are at once in constant over-supply and constant insatiable demand.

The solution: reject, reduce, reuse, recycle and repurpose.

One of my touchstone quotations, from Mark Twain is that "the man who does not read good books is no better off than the man who can not" (the illiterate). Well, there's no way I can re-read my whole library, so I am no better off for having all these wonderful books than if I had nothing but floor space.

Fortunately, bookshelves are almost as easy to get as books if you can raid the neighbourhood on garbage day (I am limited to what I can carry and have room for, which is a fraction of the resources available in my building alone).

If worse comes to worse, you can make furniture out of books and they make great heat sinks or insulation.

Still, I wish I could do this, but NIMBIES are a far greater threat than GREED.
 
2012-09-20 10:32:33 AM

Dixie_Wrecked: Of course this was not in Amurika. The entitled would have cleaned him out in a day here.


PallMall: Pfffft. If you tried that in the US, you'd get fined into eternal debt by the governmental agencies which you just went in to competition with.


Gosh, I love the knee jerk responses that claim that America and Americans are inherently worse than other places.
Little Free Libraries are taking root on lawns
 
2012-09-20 10:34:17 AM
If you tried this in America, somebody would take most of the books and then try to sell them on Ebay or Craigslist.
 
2012-09-20 10:40:31 AM

ModernLuddite: This man is a God damned hero.

//CSB Time: When my local library has a book sale, someone ALWAYS pulls up in a van and loads up about 80% of what's on offer and drives off. Then, about an hour later, you will find ALL of those books in the dumpster behind the awesome used book store downtown. Because they won't buy library books. This happens EVERY TIME. Jesus Christ.


It's a pity, but library books are often severely damaged. Not so much by the users, as by the librarians. Librarians do terrible things to books--they stamp them, lable them, paste things into them, punch them full of tiny holes, ruin the dustjackets with tape and what not. They depreciate books like capital stock rather than treasuring them--like intellectual or artistic capital. Book sellers are the same: to many of them, the books you love so much are a commodity to be bought and sold. Hard-nosed decisions are made which would horrify the average reader let alone scholars and high brow readers.

Used book buyers like their books clean and in good condition. Many people don't use libraries because they are phobic of dirty books and dirty hands. Seeing as books can become infested with bed-bugs or cockroaches, etc., they have a valid point.

There is a scavenger culture attached to the used book trade that makes a scanty income from finding books cheap and selling them where prices are higher. They raid charitable sales at churches, schools, and libraries and rescue books from dumpsters and trash cans. This is Nature being Nature--scavengers are important parts of the ecosystems which prevent us from being buried in dead bodies and dead books. But it is sad to see the best books go to waste because they are unsaleable.

The book world is one market where good quality is driven out by bad, under a variant of Gresham's Law. (Music is another--I learned very young that you can buy the great classics for next to nothing while the prices on really bad pop music are outrageous). The idealism of would-be booksellers is touching and heartening, but it soon has to yield to business principles--if it doesn't move, it is chucked. Bad books make it hard to find good books on the shelves, so they have to go if you want to sell the good books--however, defined. If this means not having shelves laden with wonderful but unsaleable classics, so be it.

The economics of the book world are far from pretty. It's a cut-throat business with razor thin margins--new bookstores make a profit of about 3%, which is one of the lowest in any trade or business.
 
2012-09-20 10:41:15 AM

stevetherobot: Gosh, I love the knee jerk responses that claim that America and Americans are inherently worse than other places.
Little Free Libraries are taking root on lawns


In quaint little communities where only a handful of folks know anything about them. Don't be a knave. As evidenced by the numerous "Lemonade Stands Under Siege" debacles... as soon as one of these libraries becomes popular, the hammer of obscure rules and law will come crashing down on it.

Marshall Willenholly: If you tried this in America, somebody would take most of the books and then try to sell them on Ebay or Craigslist.


OR THIS ^^
 
2012-09-20 10:42:54 AM

stevetherobot: Dixie_Wrecked: Of course this was not in Amurika. The entitled would have cleaned him out in a day here.

PallMall: Pfffft. If you tried that in the US, you'd get fined into eternal debt by the governmental agencies which you just went in to competition with.

Gosh, I love the knee jerk responses that claim that America and Americans are inherently worse than other places.
Little Free Libraries are taking root on lawns


I just assumed they were trolls.

Either trolls or they're such terrible people that try truly can't fathom that other people might not be like them.

/have way too many books
//when I move home, I'm donating mine to the library and schools
///I'm in Savannah now, which doesn't need them as much as home--rural Kentucky
 
2012-09-20 10:47:33 AM
Our building has, off and on, had a sharing table or shelves. Even without them, people leave things in the mail room (small items, such as the odd paperback or DVD) and the laundry room (where there is a large folding table and a counter.

When we had the book-sharing space, the more popular books would disappear, but there would always be some less popular titles, includin classics put out by people like me who find it easier to give books away than carry them to bookshops or the library store.

Yes, the bourgeois society has less of a sense of fairplay and liberality. But it is not totally absent. Some users of the sharing library would replace the books they took or put out more than than they took. But like me, they'd keep the good books rather than recycle them yet again. That hoarding instinct is hard to fight even though you intellectually know that you don't need to hoard because you already have too much.

A book lover will always buy a new book when something good turns up regardless of how many they are reading or have on their to read list. Like our bodies, our minds have not adjusted entirely to affluence. We have too much food, too many books and in some of the newer developed or developing countries, will continue to have too many children for a generation or two to come.

Scarcity has one law, abundance has another.
 
2012-09-20 10:48:06 AM

brantgoose: The economics of the book world are far from pretty. It's a cut-throat business with razor thin margins--new bookstores make a profit of about 3%, which is one of the lowest in any trade or business.


Well, if greedy publishers didn't have such astronomical asking prices, it wouldn't be as bad. I'm waiting for them to go RIAA on everyone for quoting their works in forums.
 
2012-09-20 10:52:24 AM

doloresonthedottedline: I just assumed they were trolls.

Either trolls or they're such terrible people that try truly can't fathom that other people might not be like them.

/have way too many books
//when I move home, I'm donating mine to the library and schools
///I'm in Savannah now, which doesn't need them as much as home--rural Kentucky


My wife and I have over 1,000 books around here, but I well aware that if I put them outside, they'd end up stolen, or I'd get a threatening notice from the HOA - at the very least.

I don't know what fairytale village you live in, but around here that's not "knee-jerk..." that's reality.
 
2012-09-20 10:55:50 AM
SO want to send this man something, ANYTHING. I've got some old history and sci-fi books I'm willing to part with for a good cause.
 
2012-09-20 10:58:45 AM

Rubberband Girl: SO want to send this man something, ANYTHING. I've got some old history and sci-fi books I'm willing to part with for a good cause.


LOL @ shipping costs
 
2012-09-20 11:02:58 AM

PallMall: stevetherobot: Gosh, I love the knee jerk responses that claim that America and Americans are inherently worse than other places.
Little Free Libraries are taking root on lawns

In quaint little communities where only a handful of folks know anything about them. Don't be a knave. As evidenced by the numerous "Lemonade Stands Under Siege" debacles... as soon as one of these libraries becomes popular, the hammer of obscure rules and law will come crashing down on it.

Marshall Willenholly: If you tried this in America, somebody would take most of the books and then try to sell them on Ebay or Craigslist.

OR THIS ^^


Didst thou call me a knave? I bite my thumb at thee!
 
2012-09-20 11:07:06 AM
"Do not do unto others as you would have them do unto you--their tastes may be different."

IIRC, that's from George Bernard Shaw, pseudo-paradox-mongering. It is, of course, the Golden Rule turned on its head--very rightly, as it turns out.

I read of a family of literates who used to fill a house with thousands of books and then leave them behind when they moved. This is not wise--it makes unnecessary trouble for new tenants or owners, but it makes pragmatic sense and I admire their ability to let go. On the other hand, I love the New Yorker cartoon of a real estate broker showing a young couple a wonderful upper middle class apartment lined wall-to-wall with bookcases. One of the couple (she, I think) says "What kind of freaks used to live here?" One of my favourite New Yorker cartoons, along with the young couple proudly showing their parents the built-in TV nook--the fire place.

Talk about re-purposing. Fireplaces have been turned into worse things.

It's a shame that modern houses have no bookshelves built-in. They make great insulation and with the paper-thin walls glued or stapled together like a child's school project, they could use the extra thickness and strength of really packed, sturdy bookshelves.

Why is it so hard to get real book storage? Everything is pasteboard, self-assembly. Phooey! What book lovers need is sturdy wooden crates that look beautiful when stacked and turn into instant packing when unstacked (like the Ikea storage units, only sturdy and designed for a long work life). Or else folding and stacking bookcases. I've seen those but can't find them for sale--done right they'd be foldable, stackable and assembled without nails or staples or glue or bolts and stable enough to stack to the ceiling loaded with books.

But we are not a very literate society and people assume that bookcases will hold mainly light knick-knacks, electronics and so forth. Thank god for those electronics. I find that if I have the electronic and paper version of the book I can have the best of both worlds--the wonderful experience of a well-made book in my hands when I read at home, and the efficiency of being able to read everywhere, including the shower.

That idea of putting the Kindle in a well-sealed plastic baggy was a great tip. Thanks to the Farker who mentioned it. You can't read Proust while walking city streets (sentences are too long and involved, even in English transation, let alone the original Proust), but you can really get a lot of light but informative reading done in the form of short articles and short chapters.
 
2012-09-20 11:12:51 AM

PallMall: doloresonthedottedline: I just assumed they were trolls.

Either trolls or they're such terrible people that try truly can't fathom that other people might not be like them.

/have way too many books
//when I move home, I'm donating mine to the library and schools
///I'm in Savannah now, which doesn't need them as much as home--rural Kentucky

My wife and I have over 1,000 books around here, but I well aware that if I put them outside, they'd end up stolen, or I'd get a threatening notice from the HOA - at the very least.

I don't know what fairytale village you live in, but around here that's not "knee-jerk..." that's reality.


Ah, there's your problem. This works in areas where people actually value books because they don't have unlimited access to them. Firmly middle class areas may be as terrible as you think because they've never been denied access to reading material and take their privilege for granted.

Your problem is you don't seem to realize just how many poor areas in America still see books as very valuable things that they can't easily get ahold of. I imagine a lot of inner city areas are like this. Rural Appalachian Kentucky definitely is--childhood poverty is very severe there, and there aren't many cities big enough to have public libraries. School libraries don't usually get much funding.

Americans aren't inherently terrible. And using the word "entitled" to describe the ones that are is misleading because that term is mostly used to describe poor and working class people who rely on government assistance, when they're the ones who best understand the value of things, more often than not.
 
2012-09-20 11:19:04 AM

brantgoose: "Do not do unto others as you would have them do unto you--their tastes may be different."

IIRC, that's from George Bernard Shaw, pseudo-paradox-mongering. It is, of course, the Golden Rule turned on its head--very rightly, as it turns out.

I read of a family of literates who used to fill a house with thousands of books and then leave them behind when they moved. This is not wise--it makes unnecessary trouble for new tenants or owners, but it makes pragmatic sense and I admire their ability to let go. On the other hand, I love the New Yorker cartoon of a real estate broker showing a young couple a wonderful upper middle class apartment lined wall-to-wall with bookcases. One of the couple (she, I think) says "What kind of freaks used to live here?" One of my favourite New Yorker cartoons, along with the young couple proudly showing their parents the built-in TV nook--the fire place.

Talk about re-purposing. Fireplaces have been turned into worse things.

It's a shame that modern houses have no bookshelves built-in. They make great insulation and with the paper-thin walls glued or stapled together like a child's school project, they could use the extra thickness and strength of really packed, sturdy bookshelves.

Why is it so hard to get real book storage? Everything is pasteboard, self-assembly. Phooey! What book lovers need is sturdy wooden crates that look beautiful when stacked and turn into instant packing when unstacked (like the Ikea storage units, only sturdy and designed for a long work life). Or else folding and stacking bookcases. I've seen those but can't find them for sale--done right they'd be foldable, stackable and assembled without nails or staples or glue or bolts and stable enough to stack to the ceiling loaded with books.

But we are not a very literate society and people assume that bookcases will hold mainly light knick-knacks, electronics and so forth. Thank god for those electronics. I find that if I have the electronic and paper version of the book I can have the best of both worlds--the wonderful experience of a well-made book in my hands when I read at home, and the efficiency of being able to read everywhere, including the shower.

That idea of putting the Kindle in a well-sealed plastic baggy was a great tip. Thanks to the Farker who mentioned it. You can't read Proust while walking city streets (sentences are too long and involved, even in English transation, let alone the original Proust), but you can really get a lot of light but informative reading done in the form of short articles and short chapters.


New houses are depressing to me. I live in the third story attic apartment of an old Victorian house, pre-1900 if I had to guess based on the dates I've seen posted on nearby homes. It's amazing how sturdy it feels compared to new homes. Every tiny detail is beautiful and solid.

It is hard to find good bookshelves. The cheap ones eventually start sagging and warping if you fill them with books. I've considered building my own. I'd love a really solid bookshelf like the square backless Ikea ones to use as a rook divider, big enough for a mountain of books *and* knick knacks.
 
2012-09-20 11:26:24 AM

doloresonthedottedline: Ah, there's your problem. This works in areas where people actually value books because they don't have unlimited access to them. Firmly middle class areas may be as terrible as you think because they've never been denied access to reading material and take their privilege for granted.

Your problem is you don't seem to realize just how many poor areas in America still see books as very valuable things that they can't easily get ahold of. I imagine a lot of inner city areas are like this. Rural Appalachian Kentucky definitely is--childhood poverty is very severe there, and there aren't many cities big enough to have public libraries. School libraries don't usually get much funding.


Taking the judgmental approach I see.

Do you think I amassed my book collection because I take the value of reading for granted?

Where did you get the retarded script you've quoting from? Sounds ridiculous.
 
2012-09-20 11:26:48 AM
I used to hoard books. kinda. had shelves full of the things. LOVED books, read constantly.

then I kinda got older and the time to read was just diminished. other responsibilities took the place of reading. and the books I so cherished became more of a space occupying nuisance than anything.

and then nook. I now carry in my farking pocket a far more expansive library than I ever actually owed in physical books. I find I read much more, and my love of reading has been rekindled. So I sold the books I could and gave the rest away and then made backups of my digital library.

never been happier with my reading situation. fark physical books.

/same thing happened with my ridiculous cd collection. ripped it all to flac and said sayonara to those stupid space occupying plastic discs. oh and all those goddamn dvd's too.
 
2012-09-20 11:33:38 AM

PallMall: doloresonthedottedline: Ah, there's your problem. This works in areas where people actually value books because they don't have unlimited access to them. Firmly middle class areas may be as terrible as you think because they've never been denied access to reading material and take their privilege for granted.

Your problem is you don't seem to realize just how many poor areas in America still see books as very valuable things that they can't easily get ahold of. I imagine a lot of inner city areas are like this. Rural Appalachian Kentucky definitely is--childhood poverty is very severe there, and there aren't many cities big enough to have public libraries. School libraries don't usually get much funding.

Taking the judgmental approach I see.

Do you think I amassed my book collection because I take the value of reading for granted?

Where did you get the retarded script you've quoting from? Sounds ridiculous.


By living in an area where a lot of my classmates lived in homes with dirt floors, no running water, and no electricity. And where the rest weren't doing much better.

I'm from one of, if not *the* poorest part of the country. It's the most concentrated area with the worst poverty in Appalachia.

And I find it funny that you're calling me judgmental when you're the one saying the majority if Americans are too entitled for a public library like this to at least break even between people taking and donating.
 
2012-09-20 11:38:38 AM

doloresonthedottedline: And I find it funny that you're calling me judgmental when you're the one saying the majority if Americans are too entitled for a public library like this to at least break even between people taking and donating.


Citation?

And I get it.. you grew up a poor hillbilly. I'd advise you to quit whatever job you have and follow your new found dream of getting books for poor people...

At best, you end up on the news for being such a good Samaritan and helping spread literacy and book reading. - Good Job!

At worst, you'll do nothing except complain about how others should make sure poor people get more access to books, while you sit at home crying about being less-privileged than everyone else. - Meh.
 
2012-09-20 11:44:48 AM

buntz: I have a metric fark-ton of children's books I can't get rid of. I've called Goodwill, schools, preschools, women's shelters, Half-Price Books, yard sales. NO ONE wants them. Good condition, some new condition. I simply can't give them away.

But if I hollow them out and make a craft project out of them, the internet will have my head!

But I'm not kidding, I wish I could get rid of them but I can't simply throw them away!

/not classic, just an assortment of children's books from age 1-10
//no, I won't pay to mail them to YOU


Try freecycle.org
 
2012-09-20 11:49:25 AM

PallMall: doloresonthedottedline: And I find it funny that you're calling me judgmental when you're the one saying the majority if Americans are too entitled for a public library like this to at least break even between people taking and donating.

Citation?

And I get it.. you grew up a poor hillbilly. I'd advise you to quit whatever job you have and follow your new found dream of getting books for poor people...

At best, you end up on the news for being such a good Samaritan and helping spread literacy and book reading. - Good Job!

At worst, you'll do nothing except complain about how others should make sure poor people get more access to books, while you sit at home crying about being less-privileged than everyone else. - Meh.


I wasn't raised a poor hillbilly, I was raised by a very unusual family that valued education very highly and made mostly middle class money. But there are no "nice areas," so I wasn't separated from it.

I plan to donate my books to the library and schools (mostly the schools, but some wouldn't be age appropriate) when I move home to start a business, which I'm partly doing because there are no economic opportunities in the area aside from McDonalds and the coal mines (which aren't doing so well) and I want to actively be involved in improving the options and community.

You're kind of a douchebag, by the way, so I'm putting you on ignore now.

(My citation for breaking even is the article linked, and someone else posted another citation. But I doubt you'll check because you're trolling.)
 
2012-09-20 11:59:42 AM

doloresonthedottedline: I'm putting you on ignore now.


kristinhoppe.files.wordpress.com

/hot
 
2012-09-20 12:04:21 PM
Two thousand copies of the same book? Does this guy hail from the land of Cyrodiil?
 
2012-09-20 12:04:58 PM

Dixie_Wrecked: Of course this was not in Amurika. The entitled would have cleaned him out in a day here.


You must have had a hellish formative period.
 
2012-09-20 12:07:24 PM
"Twelve years ago this guy turned his home into a public library"

Pfffft. Amateur. I know a guy who turned a public library into his home.

(Seriously. He's got a hidy-hole under the starwell.)
 
2012-09-20 12:07:52 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Try freecycle.org


Tried Freecycle too. That's how I got rid of all my old video tapes but no one wants these books. It's shocking!
 
2012-09-20 12:13:03 PM

buntz: BarkingUnicorn: Try freecycle.org

Tried Freecycle too. That's how I got rid of all my old video tapes but no one wants these books. It's shocking!


Can you list a few of the titles and authors? Decent sampling.

I know a lot of elementary school teachers who may be able to scrounge up for the shipping if their libraries can accept the books.
 
2012-09-20 12:20:32 PM

buntz: I have a metric fark-ton of children's books I can't get rid of. I've called Goodwill, schools, preschools, women's shelters, Half-Price Books, yard sales. NO ONE wants them. Good condition, some new condition. I simply can't give them away.

But if I hollow them out and make a craft project out of them, the internet will have my head!

But I'm not kidding, I wish I could get rid of them but I can't simply throw them away!

/not classic, just an assortment of children's books from age 1-10
//no, I won't pay to mail them to YOU


How about Friends of the Library? Usually, each public library has an auxiliary FOL that accepts donations and sells them to help support their library.

Children's books, printed pre-1985, are generally a problem to sell due to new government regulations over lead content. We don't sell them; we tossed 4,000 into the dumpster.
 
2012-09-20 12:25:23 PM

PallMall: brantgoose: The economics of the book world are far from pretty. It's a cut-throat business with razor thin margins--new bookstores make a profit of about 3%, which is one of the lowest in any trade or business.

Well, if greedy publishers didn't have such astronomical asking prices, it wouldn't be as bad. I'm waiting for them to go RIAA on everyone for quoting their works in forums.


Amazon and its Kindle is gutting them like fish.
 
2012-09-20 12:26:22 PM

doloresonthedottedline: brantgoose: "Do not do unto others as you would have them do unto you--their tastes may be different."

IIRC, that's from George Bernard Shaw, pseudo-paradox-mongering. It is, of course, the Golden Rule turned on its head--very rightly, as it turns out.

I read of a family of literates who used to fill a house with thousands of books and then leave them behind when they moved. This is not wise--it makes unnecessary trouble for new tenants or owners, but it makes pragmatic sense and I admire their ability to let go. On the other hand, I love the New Yorker cartoon of a real estate broker showing a young couple a wonderful upper middle class apartment lined wall-to-wall with bookcases. One of the couple (she, I think) says "What kind of freaks used to live here?" One of my favourite New Yorker cartoons, along with the young couple proudly showing their parents the built-in TV nook--the fire place.

Talk about re-purposing. Fireplaces have been turned into worse things.

It's a shame that modern houses have no bookshelves built-in. They make great insulation and with the paper-thin walls glued or stapled together like a child's school project, they could use the extra thickness and strength of really packed, sturdy bookshelves.

Why is it so hard to get real book storage? Everything is pasteboard, self-assembly. Phooey! What book lovers need is sturdy wooden crates that look beautiful when stacked and turn into instant packing when unstacked (like the Ikea storage units, only sturdy and designed for a long work life). Or else folding and stacking bookcases. I've seen those but can't find them for sale--done right they'd be foldable, stackable and assembled without nails or staples or glue or bolts and stable enough to stack to the ceiling loaded with books.

But we are not a very literate society and people assume that bookcases will hold mainly light knick-knacks, electronics and so forth. Thank god for those electronics. I find that if I have the electronic and paper ...


Try wine crates.
 
2012-09-20 12:33:49 PM

bookman: PallMall: brantgoose: The economics of the book world are far from pretty. It's a cut-throat business with razor thin margins--new bookstores make a profit of about 3%, which is one of the lowest in any trade or business.

Well, if greedy publishers didn't have such astronomical asking prices, it wouldn't be as bad. I'm waiting for them to go RIAA on everyone for quoting their works in forums.

Amazon and its Kindle is gutting them like fish.


Exactly, so instead of using basic free-market principles such as "lowering" prices to up demand, they're raising prices to offset the loss in volume sales.

Kindle and Nook are going to cause a massive upset in the publishing industry (well on its way already) in the same manner than digital music (MP3, etc) caused a ruckus in the recording industry. Once the smoke clears, Kindle/Nook copies of new books will start rising in price to squeeze the market to the limit again.
 
Displayed 50 of 54 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report