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(NBC News)   What's the safest 4-digit PIN? Not 8068 anymore   (nbcnews.com) divider line 85
    More: Obvious  
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9306 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Sep 2012 at 6:09 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-20 04:38:05 AM  
My PIN number is price of a cheese pizza and large soda at Panucci's Pizza
 
2012-09-20 04:40:41 AM  
MOON
 
2012-09-20 04:46:47 AM  
I just use the one my card carrier issued me. No one knows it but me, and it's not linked to anything.
 
2012-09-20 04:48:52 AM  

cman: My PIN number is price of a cheese pizza and large soda at Panucci's Pizza


Mine is expressible as the sum of two cubes.
 
2012-09-20 04:58:55 AM  

cman: My PIN number is price of a cheese pizza and large soda at Panucci's Pizza


Your personal identification number number?
 
2012-09-20 05:49:35 AM  

Pokey.Clyde: cman: My PIN number is price of a cheese pizza and large soda at Panucci's Pizza

Your personal identification number number?


The one he uses at the ATM machine, that's right.
 
2012-09-20 06:12:10 AM  
maxcreager.free.fr
 
2012-09-20 06:17:53 AM  

IlGreven: I just use the one my card carrier issued me. No one knows it but me, and it's not linked to anything.


That works if you use it often enough so you remember it (so I do that for my debit card), but I have forgotten my pin for both my savings account and credit card as I normally don't use them for "live" payments (I tried to change them to the same number as my debit card when I originally got them, but it wouldn't allow that).
 
2012-09-20 06:21:00 AM  
The trick is not to use a whole number
 
2012-09-20 06:25:49 AM  
FTFA:The researchers there went through a set of 3.4 million four-digit personal identification numbers and found "8068" came up only 25 times.

But now that this news is out, that's probably a PIN to stay away from. As Softpedia pointed out, would-be thieves may start trying that combination right after they hit "1234" ― the most common PIN, with nearly 11 percent frequency.


Thieves typically try the most common PIN but will now try the least common one - that makes complete logical sense.

I don't think people change PINs that often so I'm sure there isn't a stampede to change to 8068 .
 
2012-09-20 06:29:48 AM  
would-be thieves may start trying that combination right after they hit "1234" ― the most common PIN, with nearly 11 percent frequency.

If your pin is 1234 you fail at life. Guess 11% fail.

 
2012-09-20 06:31:11 AM  
Well I'm probably safe with 2094
 
2012-09-20 06:36:41 AM  
A few years ago, a credit union sent me an ATM card with a new (I assume computer generated) PIN...which turned out to be my birthday.

Surprised the random number generator doesn't have a checker to screen numbers like that out. I wonder if you can get 1234 as a generated password? Seems like it should happen once every 10,000 times.
 
2012-09-20 06:46:49 AM  
None of them anymore, not when everyone's PIN has been revealed.

Check it out. Yours is there too, I guarantee it.
 
2012-09-20 06:55:48 AM  

Millennium: None of them anymore, not when everyone's PIN has been revealed.

Check it out. Yours is there too, I guarantee it.


I have a 6 digit pin number. Honestly, it's much more secure and not any harder to remember. I don't know why it's not becoming more standard.
 
2012-09-20 06:57:22 AM  
HA! Nobody will ever guess mine is 8069.
 
2012-09-20 07:02:57 AM  
Guess I gotta go change my luggage combination!
 
2012-09-20 07:10:33 AM  

SJKebab: Pokey.Clyde: cman: My PIN number is price of a cheese pizza and large soda at Panucci's Pizza

Your personal identification number number?

The one he uses at the ATM machine, that's right.


Damn, you guys are smart. You must be very proud of yourselves.
 
2012-09-20 07:28:25 AM  
Safest =\= least used.
 
2012-09-20 07:32:11 AM  
My pin number is in base 16.

It's very, very difficult to find an ATM I can use.
 
2012-09-20 07:42:40 AM  
PLEASE tell me I wasn't the only one who read that as "8086".
 
2012-09-20 07:42:45 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: I have a 6 digit pin number. Honestly, it's much more secure and not any harder to remember. I don't know why it's not becoming more standard.


Us normal people only have five fingers on each hand. You use the last finger to hit "Enter". Duh. You stupid or something?
 
2012-09-20 07:46:45 AM  
Holy shiat. People really are fark-tarded.

Though I suppose most of those 1234567 PINs are from the people who have no money anyway.
 
2012-09-20 07:47:52 AM  

Rockstone: PLEASE tell me I wasn't the only one who read that as "8086".


Nope
 
2012-09-20 07:53:33 AM  
My PIN is "12345."

The same as on my luggage.
 
2012-09-20 07:57:18 AM  
So the researchers, according to the farking article, went through 3.4 million PIN's. Assuming they are actual users PIN's....

Where the fark did they get them, and who them to them?
 
2012-09-20 08:01:57 AM  

stuhayes2010: Safest =\= least used.


In this case it does. There have been studies like this of vary degree, thieves do know the most used PINs and try those first. If only 25 out of 3.4 million use 8068, trying it is the worst thing they could do. Most ATMs give them 3 attempts before it eats the card. So 2 attempts, cancel, 2 attempts, cancel..... why try a number you know is LEAST likely to be used?

Depending on the 2nd least used PIN 8068 is still the MOST safe until it surpasses the next one up.
 
2012-09-20 08:02:16 AM  

xanadian: My PIN is "12345."

The same as on my luggage.


Oh, thanks! I forgot my pin, and you've given me the clue I needed.

My pin is... SAMSONITE.

Boy, I was WAY off!
 
2012-09-20 08:05:30 AM  

IlGreven: I just use the one my card carrier issued me. No one knows it but me, and it's not linked to anything.


Cute and a sensible line of thinking however... the banks computer knows about it as well. There was a flurry of stories a a little while ago that can be basically summed up as: outsourcing the back end to 'low cost countries' has saved the banks a packet, it's also saved the fraudsters a packets as well as £10k will go a lot further with them.

They were selling cards and the bank issued PIN's wholesale; several people had cards literally arrive the same day as a bank statement that showed it'd been used whilst it was still in transit to them.

I'm also not totally convinced any given PIN is safer than any other considering the skimmers have cameras in them these days as opposed to someone looking over your shoulder.
 
2012-09-20 08:06:10 AM  
The hilarious thing is that I've actually had an account in the past whose automatically-issued pin was 8068.

No, I'm NOT kidding.
 
2012-09-20 08:09:52 AM  
My pin is based on the german name of my wife's first car.
/Except on every other electronic gadget I own, where it is something else.
 
2012-09-20 08:15:45 AM  
I like to use prime numbers. Doesn't work out so well for 4 digit PINs though 1-2-3-5 although sometimes I count 1 as a prime and sometimes I don't...I can never remember when I set them up whether it is or not, anyway, 1-2-3-5-7-1-1-1-3 even on systems where they say you can't use a recognizable pattern it doesn't notice.
 
2012-09-20 08:15:54 AM  
Cool fact. If you type your PIN in FARK comments, it will come up all asterisks.

See: ****
 
2012-09-20 08:18:11 AM  
666 - The PIN of the beast.
 
2012-09-20 08:34:20 AM  

vegasj: would-be thieves may start trying that combination right after they hit "1234" ― the most common PIN, with nearly 11 percent frequency.

If your pin is 1234 you fail at life. Guess 11% fail.


I'm guessing the people that use the codes that start with "19" are using their own birth year. Which is equally failish.

I used to scam scammers on Diablo 2 for fun. On the off chance that I couldn't trick them in to flat out giving me their password, I could almost always get them with their email (which was hopefully a hotmail/msn acct), what town they lived in and then I'd go to forgot pass. Enter their email, and zip code. After that the usual question was "What is your favorite color?" I'd always get it by trying red, green, blue, black.
 
2012-09-20 08:36:33 AM  

Rockstone: PLEASE tell me I wasn't the only one who read that as "8086".


It took me until I read your comment before I realised it wasn't 8086.
 
2012-09-20 08:41:51 AM  
xanadian: My PIN is "12345." The same as on my luggage.

Came here for the Spaceballs reference, leaving satisfied.
 
2012-09-20 08:43:29 AM  
I thought you couldn't set obvious numbers as your PIN. I'm pretty sure my bank won't let me enter 1111 or 1234 or 9876 etc as a new PIN.

/I'll check on a mechanised ,self-operational, unmanned ATM machine later.
 
2012-09-20 08:44:41 AM  

cman: My PIN number is price of a cheese pizza and large soda at Panucci's Pizza


done in one
 
2012-09-20 08:46:53 AM  
My pin is 42 in binary
 
2012-09-20 08:47:03 AM  

ghall3: I like to use prime numbers. Doesn't work out so well for 4 digit PINs though 1-2-3-5 although sometimes I count 1 as a prime and sometimes I don't...I can never remember when I set them up whether it is or not, anyway, 1-2-3-5-7-1-1-1-3 even on systems where they say you can't use a recognizable pattern it doesn't notice.


Many of the "don't use a pattern" systems I've come across don't recognize fibonacci sequence either. Not recognizing one of the most well known patterns?
 
2012-09-20 08:50:33 AM  

turboke: Rockstone: PLEASE tell me I wasn't the only one who read that as "8086".

It took me until I read your comment before I realised it wasn't 8086.


Same here.

I got lucky that my newest PIN was only one digit off from the PIN I used to use. So I was able to switch over pretty easily.
 
2012-09-20 08:59:59 AM  

Rockstone: PLEASE tell me I wasn't the only one who read that as "8086".


Until your comment I thought that's what it was.
 
2012-09-20 09:16:02 AM  

farker99: My pin is based on the german name of my wife's first car.
/Except on every other electronic gadget I own, where it is something else.


She had an audi quattro so your pin is 4444?
 
2012-09-20 09:17:16 AM  
www.hecklerspray.com

/hot like a planet with two suns
 
2012-09-20 09:31:24 AM  
images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-09-20 09:33:06 AM  
I was born in 1965, so I use 6519. Nobody would ever guess that, right?
 
2012-09-20 09:53:32 AM  

somemoron: So the researchers, according to the farking article, went through 3.4 million PIN's. Assuming they are actual users PIN's....

Where the fark did they get them, and who them to them?


They used 4-digit numerical passwords from leaked databases, not actual PINs. The reasoning is that most people with numeric passwords would probably use the same number as a PIN.

NBC News, Y U NO link to the actual research?
 
2012-09-20 09:56:28 AM  
8169!
 
2012-09-20 10:06:36 AM  
Numbers that spell dirty words on phones are good PINs

go 3852 yourself
 
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