If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Perth Now)   Scientists say there really may be a sea monster living in a Russian lake. With photographic evidence of what is either a sea monster, or a floating street light, or a bobbing sasquatch, or a buoy   (perthnow.com.au) divider line 36
    More: Unlikely, Lake Labynkyr, Siberian, Russians, Loch Ness Monster, lakes, climate of Antarctica  
•       •       •

10373 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Sep 2012 at 5:56 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



36 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-09-20 02:58:48 AM
Or.

Just a dude standing in the water.
 
2012-09-20 03:23:47 AM
It's a pneumatic bobbing sasquatch.
 
2012-09-20 04:11:41 AM
If it's in a lake, wouldn't it be a lake monster?
 
2012-09-20 05:01:53 AM

eyehate: Or.

Just a dude standing in the water.


imageshack.us

/what?
//a girl can dream
 
2012-09-20 05:58:22 AM
Wow, even for a photoshop this is just sad. Look...look...a blob...waaaay off in the distance. ITS A MONSTER...AHHHHH...

/facepalms
 
2012-09-20 06:09:45 AM
What the fark does 'Climate of Antarctica' have to do with a story about a 'monster' in a Siberian lake?
 
2012-09-20 06:10:47 AM
I admit I've always been a "I want to believe" type when it comes to lake and sea monsters. but even I gotta say as evidence, this is pretty damn weak.
 
2012-09-20 06:13:08 AM
"Researchers using a Hummingbird Piranha"

That's just begging for a photoshop.

/thought this would be Baikal; that's a spooky lake
 
2012-09-20 06:15:56 AM
tree fiddy.
 
2012-09-20 06:49:50 AM
Why doesnt the lake freeze over?
 
2012-09-20 06:51:10 AM

Shirley Ujest: Why doesnt the lake freeze over?


That's what I was wondering since it is the only one in the area that doesn't...and no plant life. Plus the story from the book at the end is kind of cool.
 
2012-09-20 06:53:01 AM
A buoy? It could be a gull.
 
2012-09-20 06:55:17 AM

OhioUGrad: Shirley Ujest: Why doesnt the lake freeze over?

That's what I was wondering since it is the only one in the area that doesn't...and no plant life.


It's because the monster pees in the water.
 
2012-09-20 07:02:33 AM
It looks like the silhouette for a long gun target.

There's probably no plant life, and doesn't freeze over because the lake is very salty. If that's not the case, then I have no farking clue...
I love the story from the 20s included in TFA. Sack of animal skin, stuffed with smouldering wood. Sounds like an old story from Poland, how they used basically the same thing to kill a dragon that was eating their livestock. I still have the same question for this story. What did they do with the body/bones? Why wouldn't you keep the skull at least to preserve what you saw/fought, at least for bragging rights, if not scientific discovery/research?

/Fake
 
2012-09-20 07:05:10 AM

Cybernetic: OhioUGrad: Shirley Ujest: Why doesnt the lake freeze over?

That's what I was wondering since it is the only one in the area that doesn't...and no plant life.

It's because the monster pees in the water.


Well, I guess they do call him the 'Devil' so that may be why also.
 
2012-09-20 07:17:25 AM

Shirley Ujest: Why doesnt the lake freeze over?


I think it does. The Russian wikipedia article seems to be saying that it freezes over later in the year than the other nearby lakes, and doesn't form as solid a surface (allowing some possibility of airholes if there were large creatures in the lake). The difference may depend on the relatively greater depth of the lake giving it a different surface/volume ratio than the others (one reason that, say, Lake Tahoe doesn't freeze over). But who knows. It's crazy Russian lake monsters.
 
2012-09-20 07:19:31 AM
Gonna need 'bout tree-fiddy.
 
2012-09-20 07:27:01 AM
There needs to be some sort of certification before you can call yourself a "scientist".
 
2012-09-20 07:29:51 AM
FTFA: "I can't say we literally found and touched something unusual there but we did register with our echo sounding device several seriously big underwater objects, bigger than a fish, bigger than even a group of fish."

Big underwater objects? Well, I'm convinced. What else could it possibly be?

As an aside, alleged scientist "Lyudmila Emeliyanova" has, apparently, zero previous web presence. I have a bigger online footprint than she does. So that seems legit. Perhaps somebody with access to relevant science journals can tell us what her previous publication record is, but right now she is about as credible as Area Man.
 
2012-09-20 07:40:32 AM
wouldnt a sack of animal skin stuffed with smouldering wood just be like a crappy barbecue? so, they killed it with barecue? Learn something new every day.
 
2012-09-20 07:55:01 AM

czetie: As an aside, alleged scientist "Lyudmila Emeliyanova" has, apparently, zero previous web presence


What's the Cyrillic for that?
 
2012-09-20 08:27:03 AM
"Them things told the Kanakys that ef they mixed bloods there'd be children as ud look human at fust, but later turn more'n more like the things, till finally they'd take to the water an' jine the main lot o' things daown thar. An' this is the important part, young feller-them as turned into fish things an' went into the water wouldn't never die. Them things never died excep' they was kilt violent."
 
2012-09-20 08:32:13 AM
Looks like we should name it...Bob.
 
2012-09-20 09:02:22 AM
Wait- there's no plant life but there is fish?
 
2012-09-20 09:06:12 AM

dudemanbro: If it's in a lake, wouldn't it be a lake monster?


One of those miserable, tubthumping lakemonsters?
 
2012-09-20 09:16:07 AM

OregonVet: Wait- there's no plant life but there is fish?


Then who was lake???1
 
2012-09-20 10:33:01 AM

MadMonk: "Them things told the Kanakys that ef they mixed bloods there'd be children as ud look human at fust, but later turn more'n more like the things, till finally they'd take to the water an' jine the main lot o' things daown thar. An' this is the important part, young feller-them as turned into fish things an' went into the water wouldn't never die. Them things never died excep' they was kilt violent."


Old Zadok sees what you did there.

And wants more whiskey.
 
2012-09-20 12:45:15 PM
It's ....
 
2012-09-20 12:49:41 PM
static.guim.co.uk

I WANT TO BELIEVE
 
2012-09-20 12:57:29 PM

LordJiro: What the fark does 'Climate of Antarctica' have to do with a story about a 'monster' in a Siberian lake?


All monsters are found frozen in ice. The US Air Force releases them when they drop bombs in the area. Everybody who has watched B-movies knows that.

It dates back to Shelley's Frankenstein, actually. Not the movie where the Monster is buried in rubble, or the one where he is preserved in bubbling sulphurous mud, but the one where he is frozen in a glacier, like in the original book, where he is frozen in the ice pack of the Arctic. Prometheus, as you may recall, was condemned by Zeus to die each day by having his liver pecked out by a giant eagle on the side of a mountain where he was chained. Frankenstein followed the Greek myth and made the Monster more or less indestructible and this proved to be a meme of great survival and spreading power.

The motion picture industry is nothing if not dedicated to recycling forever.
 
2012-09-20 01:09:00 PM

Joce678: There needs to be some sort of certification before you can call yourself a "scientist".


Scientists are always "baffled" in the press. This is because journalists are lazy and don't ask the right scientist for an opinion, they'll just grab any old scientist or even a TV weatherman (the High Priests of Science in America, which goes to prove something, something sad, about the state of Science in America).

Some of the most enduring myths of our time are the result of journalists cornering a scientist at a party or grabbing their lapel for a "quote".

For example, we only use 10% of our brain (wrong--we use it all, all of the time--scientists just don't understand what much of it does), bumblebees shouldn't be able to fly (the fact that they do proves this wrong, but it was the result of a scientist being questioned at a party in Switzerland over 60 years ago--nobody understood the aerodynamics of bee flight at the time and the analogy with fixed wing aircraft was faulty), and global warming is not happened because derp, derp, derp, derp.

Siberia doesn't really have the climate of Antartica. It is much, much warmer. It has trees, for example. Antartica is mostly ice with a bit of bacteria. Only the warmer bits have moss and there are no trees at all--haven't been trees there for millions of years.

Siberia is cold, though, and the coldness of the climate supposedly means that dinosaurs and stuff still exist frozen in the permafrost.

By the way, some of the natives in Siberia believed that Mammoths lived underground and still do.

As I have pointed out before, a distant relation of mine, Dr. Ezekiel Stone Wiggins, believed that dinosaurs still survived on the bottom of the sea and that the Moon had an atmosphere because for some reason planets were invisible if they didn't have an atmosphere.

He was an educated man, very intelligent, but a crank for all that. So are some "scientists" questioned by journalists. Journalists love to shake things up. Like London hostesses, they never ask a geologist about geology for fear of getting an answer. They'll ask him what he thinks about the latest climate science. Ignorance is a great equalizer so society hostesses always make sure their guests know absolutely nothing about whatever the current topic of conversation is.
 
2012-09-20 01:11:39 PM
I've heard of this one before. But lake monsters are like a dime a dozen in cryptozoology and unless somebody really does drain a lake or pull a carcass ashore, nothing for sure will ever be proven.

/So many other mysterious creatures and all we do is focus on ugly apes and big fish.
 
2012-09-20 01:20:00 PM
mvsm.omnomzom.com
 
2012-09-20 01:23:01 PM
FTA: hey say fishermen saw some strange waves before their boat suddenly shook. There was no wind, no other boats to cause the waves. Suddenly the bow began to rise as if someone was pushing it from under the water. The fishermen were stuck by fear. They did not see anything. And then just as it rose up, the boat went down.

This phenomenon has been observed in Loch Ness. Solenoid waves (freak, single waves that form from the interaction of many other waves in large bodies of water or deep and narrow bodies like these lakes) can be a real hazard to shipping and may explain many ship disappearances.

You can sometimes see them on Loch Ness and they have been photographed and filmed almost as often as the "monster".

They may be connected to "lake monster" sightings because they can cause sunken logs and other debris to bob at the surface. A tree trunk or a stump looks a lot like a blurry dot from a distance. In this case, I would say the object was most likely a stump, as it it shaped like a bust (in the sculptural sense of a head and shoulders sculpture).

The lake is probably prevented from freezing by 1) salinity; 2) depth; and 3) turnover. Deep water is prone to violence when a storm blows through and it is less likely to freeze because the deep water maintains a temperature just above freezing where shallow water would become super-chilled.

There may also be a considerable amount of turnover (periodically the top layer becomes denser than the deeper water and they "flip").

Some lakes avoid freezing because of gas or minerals or both. A deep lake like Loch Ness (IIRC, about 400 feet in places) may have natural gas or carbon dioxide leaks. Some of these lakes periodically kill everything around them, although in most cases the lack of plant growth is due to the cold water, a high degree of purity, and the sheerness of the lake walls.

Loch Ness has very little plankton, algae or plant life of any kind. It can not support a very large fish population and presumably has no large population of giant lake monsters feeding on fish or even algae. It has salmon, but they are probably a lot skinnier than sea-faring salmon. I've seen photos of Arctic lake salmon so skinny they are anorexic-looking--all head and spine, no fat or meat to speak of. Some lakes in Canada (some of those meteor craters) have such pure water, fish can barely survive. They look like deep sea monsters.

Under such conditions, not a lot of life survives compared to "normal" lakes with flat shallow bottoms exposed to sunlight. If the lakes are fed by rainwater rather than rivers, they may not have much in the way of nutrients.

Well, that answers many of the questions that the journalists couldn't be bothered to ask or the editors bothered to print.

Science is always happy to spoil mysteries for every one. As long as it lets my cola alone, I'm all for it. The world has plenty of mysteries and it is fun to spoil them.
 
2012-09-20 04:46:08 PM
i119.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-20 06:24:24 PM

brantgoose: By the way, some of the natives in Siberia believed that Mammoths lived underground and still do.


The last known population of wooly mammoths survived, astonishingly, well into historical times on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean, finally going extinct around 1700 BC. It's not inconceivable that folk tales about the last mammoths have been passed down in corrupted form since then.

As I have pointed out before, a distant relation of mine, Dr. Ezekiel Stone Wiggins, believed that dinosaurs still survived on the bottom of the sea and that the Moon had an atmosphere because for some reason planets were invisible if they didn't have an atmosphere.

That is actually pretty cool. No snark.
 
Displayed 36 of 36 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »





Report