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(Smithsonian Magazine)   Why a 50-year-old kiddie cartoon still matters. "Thanks in large part to the Jetsons, there's a sense of betrayal that is pervasive in American culture today about the future that never arrived"   (blogs.smithsonianmag.com) divider line 102
    More: Interesting, distillation processes, Google Alerts, Los Angeles Auto Show, Apollo program, American culture, Sputnik, Jane Jetson  
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3107 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Sep 2012 at 12:41 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-19 07:24:46 PM  
By definition, the future never arrives.

This author seems to be about 12 years old and stuck there.
 
2012-09-19 09:07:57 PM  
Mouthy robot maids, an over-reliance on a cog/sprocket-based economy and wives deafened to the cries of dog walk mishaps? Not a future I want to live in.
 
2012-09-19 09:18:33 PM  
Won't the future be GREAT!
ionetheurbandaily.files.wordpress.com

There's a joke in here somewhere....

amidoingitright.jpg
 
2012-09-19 09:30:28 PM  
Fun fact: the national park system was kept at least in part because people in the '60s expected the low workweek prevalent in the Jetsons, as a counterweight to high productivity and therefore low number of hours necessary to work. So it was expected that by now we'd only be working 10 hours a week or so, and we'd need places to go to keep ourselves entertained with all the time we now have. Of course, it was also expected that multiple people work work the same job to maintain the 40 hour workweek we have now, so if George worked 10 hours, there would be 3 other people with the same job who would work when he didn't. It was expected for some reason that companies would do this and that they weren't evil, soulless bastards.
 
2012-09-19 09:42:08 PM  
Music of the future was better on The Jetsons.

Eep Opp Ork Ah-Ah
 
2012-09-19 09:51:26 PM  
I'd post but I have push-button-itis.
 
2012-09-19 10:00:36 PM  
James Cameron talks about the future of interactive movies. ("There might be a certain amount of interactivity, so when you look around, it creates that image wherever you look," Cameron says. He concedes it is far off: "You're talking 'Jetsons' here.")

Oh shut the fark up, Cameron. Your so called innovations in moviemaking are bullshiat. Take a look at my reel though. EIP.
 
2012-09-19 10:22:33 PM  
Where's my frikkin flying CAR?

/I'd like to beat George Jetson
 
2012-09-19 10:39:36 PM  

Dahnkster: Won't the future be GREAT!
[ionetheurbandaily.files.wordpress.com image 640x414]

There's a joke in here somewhere....

amidoingitright.jpg


Yo Jetsons, I'm really happy for you, I'ma Let you finish, but Japanese animations from the '50s are the best future projectors of of all time.
 
2012-09-19 10:43:59 PM  

GAT_00: Fun fact: the national park system was kept at least in part because people in the '60s expected the low workweek prevalent in the Jetsons, as a counterweight to high productivity and therefore low number of hours necessary to work. So it was expected that by now we'd only be working 10 hours a week or so, and we'd need places to go to keep ourselves entertained with all the time we now have. Of course, it was also expected that multiple people work work the same job to maintain the 40 hour workweek we have now, so if George worked 10 hours, there would be 3 other people with the same job who would work when he didn't. It was expected for some reason that companies would do this and that they weren't evil, soulless bastards.


As opposed to mandatory unpaid overtime. Now get back to work.
 
2012-09-19 11:03:56 PM  
Great article (and I'm glad they mentioned the 80s syndicated reboot)

but where's the cigarette ads?

Guess the Jetsons were a bit too squeaky clean with 20th century products instead

They also went to Cellphone Shack

/just a dime a minute, how futuristic was that!
 
2012-09-19 11:58:40 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Where's my frikkin flying CAR?

/I'd like to beat George Jetson


Capt. Sisko asked that very same question about twelve years ago.
 
2012-09-20 12:30:24 AM  
The Flintstones were Democrats and The Jetsons were Republicans
 
2012-09-20 12:45:40 AM  

GAT_00: Fun fact: the national park system was kept at least in part because people in the '60s expected the low workweek prevalent in the Jetsons, as a counterweight to high productivity and therefore low number of hours necessary to work. So it was expected that by now we'd only be working 10 hours a week or so, and we'd need places to go to keep ourselves entertained with all the time we now have. Of course, it was also expected that multiple people work work the same job to maintain the 40 hour workweek we have now, so if George worked 10 hours, there would be 3 other people with the same job who would work when he didn't. It was expected for some reason that companies would do this and that they weren't evil, soulless bastards.


It'd also be extremely inefficient to have multiple people taking shifts at the same job. No one does things quite the same way (at least in a small business).
 
2012-09-20 12:46:30 AM  

Mugato: James Cameron talks about the future of interactive movies. ("There might be a certain amount of interactivity, so when you look around, it creates that image wherever you look," Cameron says. He concedes it is far off: "You're talking 'Jetsons' here.")

Oh shut the fark up, Cameron. Your so called innovations in moviemaking are bullshiat. Take a look at my reel though. EIP.


Cameron has done some amazing things in film making. Not the actual movies mind you - but in the technology that goes into making them and he deserves credit for that. However - he is wrong that people care about interactivity. This dream of people choosing their own paths through stories have been proven wrong and wrong again. Most people don't want to work at their entertainment - they just want to sit there, watch reality shows, and drink beer.
 
2012-09-20 12:47:45 AM  
There's no flying cars because most people are just barely able to handle the X and Y axis without adding Z in too.
 
2012-09-20 12:49:02 AM  
Jetsons?

BS

I remember a children's book that told me I'd vacation on the MOON.

WTF? I want my moon vacation.
 
2012-09-20 12:53:10 AM  
Not to mention a crippling fear of treadmills

imageshack.us
 
2012-09-20 12:54:28 AM  
Well, maybe if science education didn't suck so much in public schools.....
 
2012-09-20 12:58:59 AM  
No, when I was in elementary school, we had an assembly where the speaker told us that we had to study hard at math and science because while almost no one was an astronaut today, when we grew up 1 in 7 jobs would be connected to space. Then Challenger blew up, killed one farking teacher, and republicans had the excuse they needed to start strangling the life out of that dream. The Jetsons was just the show that came on after the Flintstones.
 
2012-09-20 01:03:46 AM  
On todays science debate , we have a PHD panel of top credited scientists and engineers. To provide counterpoint to their views we have some guy we found screaming at squirrels in the park, he's got a diploma from some random online diploma mill so his opinion is "equally valid".

We report, you decide!
 
2012-09-20 01:05:36 AM  
Eep op ork ah ah.
 
2012-09-20 01:06:54 AM  
Yeah, the future never arrived while I talk to you all on my computer from wherever you are located anywhere on the world. I'm going to go read something about transplants now. They've became quite mundane.
 
2012-09-20 01:11:56 AM  
You notice they're always on those floating platforms? That's because the ground is uninhabitable and toxic.

Oh yeah, bring on the future.
 
2012-09-20 01:13:05 AM  
www.bohemianpixel.com
 
2012-09-20 01:15:49 AM  
www.cartoonscrapbook.com

Spacepalm
 
2012-09-20 01:19:07 AM  
The only authoritative book on the future:

2010: Life in the Future
 
2012-09-20 01:22:05 AM  

GAT_00: Fun fact: the national park system was kept at least in part because people in the '60s expected the low workweek prevalent in the Jetsons, as a counterweight to high productivity and therefore low number of hours necessary to work. So it was expected that by now we'd only be working 10 hours a week or so, and we'd need places to go to keep ourselves entertained with all the time we now have.

Well that's an urban legend and a half.

Of course, it was also expected that multiple people work work the same job to maintain the 40 hour workweek we have now, so if George worked 10 hours, there would be 3 other people with the same job who would work when he didn't. It was expected for some reason that companies would do this and that they weren't evil, soulless bastards.

Because it would be so much better if all the scientists and engineers in the world were instead only working ten hours a week toward human subsistence. Who needs technological and medical advances. How dare the evil corporations force this upon us.

 
2012-09-20 01:27:44 AM  
The farked up thing about the Jetsons was that it held that the 1950s faux-America "Leave it to Beaver" dreamworld would somehow still exist hundreds(?) of years into the future. Cultures that stagnate like that, well...they die.
 
2012-09-20 01:31:13 AM  

aerojockey: GAT_00: Fun fact: the national park system was kept at least in part because people in the '60s expected the low workweek prevalent in the Jetsons, as a counterweight to high productivity and therefore low number of hours necessary to work. So it was expected that by now we'd only be working 10 hours a week or so, and we'd need places to go to keep ourselves entertained with all the time we now have.

Well that's an urban legend and a half.

Of course, it was also expected that multiple people work work the same job to maintain the 40 hour workweek we have now, so if George worked 10 hours, there would be 3 other people with the same job who would work when he didn't. It was expected for some reason that companies would do this and that they weren't evil, soulless bastards.

Because it would be so much better if all the scientists and engineers in the world were instead only working ten hours a week toward human subsistence. Who needs technological and medical advances. How dare the evil corporations force this upon us.


Well, I'm totally convinced because of the bold letters.

How about they actually find the smart people early on and give them a better education instead of tacking on a few extra credit book reports and having them do a bit of college math in high school? The current system seems to be designed to crush creativity, waste intelligence, and make many talented people work useless cog making jobs.
 
2012-09-20 01:37:43 AM  
I recall an episode with George breaking the fourth and complaining about his income.

"A thousand bucks a week doesnt go as far as it used to."

The laugh track roared. 

/kinda blows me away there was just one season
 
2012-09-20 01:49:19 AM  
I actually remember sitting there watching the show and really, really looking forward to when I'd grow up and live in a space needle.

//prime time entertainment
/whole family watched
 
2012-09-20 01:58:37 AM  

FunkOut: Well, I'm totally convinced because of the bold letters.



How about they actually find the smart people early on and give them a better education instead of tacking on a few extra credit book reports and having them do a bit of college math in high school? The current system seems to be designed to crush creativity, waste intelligence, and make many talented people work useless cog making jobs.


Good idea, however I'm going to opine that even with a good educational system our scientists and engineers would not be four times as productive as they are now.

And if they were, then we (i.e., society) would probably still want them to work 40 hours a week and deliver four times the progress.

10 hour work weeks is a dream. When we (i.e. society) gain efficiency, we don't put it toward liesure time, we put to toward greater progress. Just like the idea that faster computers with more memory are going to make our computers work faster. It doesn't happen that way: the computers get more powerful and complex, but they still sit there for 20 seconds unresponsive loading drivers or starting a word processor.
 
2012-09-20 02:09:47 AM  

aerojockey: FunkOut: Well, I'm totally convinced because of the bold letters.



How about they actually find the smart people early on and give them a better education instead of tacking on a few extra credit book reports and having them do a bit of college math in high school? The current system seems to be designed to crush creativity, waste intelligence, and make many talented people work useless cog making jobs.

Good idea, however I'm going to opine that even with a good educational system our scientists and engineers would not be four times as productive as they are now.

And if they were, then we (i.e., society) would probably still want them to work 40 hours a week and deliver four times the progress.

10 hour work weeks is a dream. When we (i.e. society) gain efficiency, we don't put it toward liesure time, we put to toward greater progress. Just like the idea that faster computers with more memory are going to make our computers work faster. It doesn't happen that way: the computers get more powerful and complex, but they still sit there for 20 seconds unresponsive loading drivers or starting a word processor.


What we need are time machines.
 
2012-09-20 02:20:56 AM  

aerojockey: 10 hour work weeks is a dream. When we (i.e. society) gain efficiency, we don't put it toward liesure time, we put to toward greater progress. Just like the idea that faster computers with more memory are going to make our computers work faster. It doesn't happen that way: the computers get more powerful and complex, but they still sit there for 20 seconds unresponsive loading drivers or starting a word processor.


Come to think of it, these two problems cancel out. We just tell all the software engineers to work only ten hours (which of course would have a cascading effect all over the workforce, so that everyone has more free time). Then we are stuck using Word 5.0, which will run blazing fast on a recent Intel i7 system. Course, we'll have to kidnap the hardware engineers and force them to continue working long hours.

FunkOut: What we need are time machines.


Have you ever noticed that time machines are rarely ever machines? I mean, they might have mechanical parts to support the time travel apparatus, but the actual time travel is done by some kind of non-mechanical force field. It's not like anyone travels back in time by spinning a wheel real fast.
 
2012-09-20 02:33:24 AM  

aerojockey: Then we are stuck using Word 5.0


Yes, because no one makes good software for free. Now if you'll excuse me, I need to close Firefox and go back to writing in LibreOffice on my computer running Linux Mint so I have time to edit some pictures in GIMP.
 
2012-09-20 02:45:49 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: aerojockey: Then we are stuck using Word 5.0

Yes, because no one makes good software for free. Now if you'll excuse me, I need to close Firefox and go back to writing in LibreOffice on my computer running Linux Mint so I have time to edit some pictures in GIMP.


You know you're an obsessed open source fanboy when you follow-up to a post that has absolutely nothing to do with software freedom, simply because someone name-dropped a piece of commercial software in the post.

We are having a discussion on social economics. We don't care about your silly little holy war.

(P.S. You know at least three of the softwares you listed are heavily supported commercially, and at least two have programmers assigned to them full time, right?)
 
2012-09-20 02:47:20 AM  

aerojockey: It's not like anyone travels back in time by spinning a wheel real fast.


I tried a time machine that used a lever once but just ended up really far away.
 
2012-09-20 02:54:12 AM  

FunkOut: aerojockey: It's not like anyone travels back in time by spinning a wheel real fast.

I tried a time machine that used a lever once but just ended up really far away.


The worst time machines are definitely inclined planes.
 
2012-09-20 02:56:50 AM  
Meh. I guess I'm the only person in the world who never liked the Jetsons or the Flintstones growing up.

Too busy watching Loonie Tunes I guess.
 
2012-09-20 03:20:41 AM  

SN1987a goes boom: The farked up thing about the Jetsons was that it held that the 1950s faux-America "Leave it to Beaver" dreamworld would somehow still exist hundreds(?) of years into the future. Cultures that stagnate like that, well...they die.


Unless, it's a society that has cycled back to those values.

/as Criswell has said, we must all think about the Future.
//it's where we are going to spend the rest of our lives.
 
2012-09-20 03:21:31 AM  
Orbity sucked.. Annoying POS ruined the show. It was like Jar-Jar binks of The Jetsons.
 
2012-09-20 05:40:42 AM  
I hated the 80's continuation of the series. The soundtrack stunk and all of the satire had been sucked out of it. And I wanted to kick Orbity into orbit.

Early 60's Jetsons couldn't have predicted feminism and the desire of millions of women to head into a workforce that had finally become safe and pleasant enough for them to work in. (And of course, the birth control which allowed them to have sex without continuously pumping out babies.) Housewife Jane Jetson seemed pretty damned bored most of the time so I suppose this was a good thing, although I do envy her all the free time she seemed to have....
 
2012-09-20 06:50:36 AM  
Yeah man, the present sucks.


-sent from my insanely powerful PHONE THAT I CARRY IN MY POCKET that can shoot video, record high quality audio, play video games, and basically connects me to a huge network of intelligence that otherwise didn't existing 20 years ago.-
 
2012-09-20 06:51:48 AM  
Subby is probably not far from the truth tho.

There were alot of things built in the era just prior to the health and safety focused future we ended up in. Moon rockets, jet packs, flying cars, flying podiums, private submarines and underwater homes. Commercial travel through space seemed just around the corner and living in the sky was a matter of engineering. The machines in James bond movies were real instead of CGI.
Somewhere after the 70's, we stopped thinking on how to build the future and started becoming obsessed with how to screw each other in the stock market. Then reality started catching up to us with the price of oil and the terrorism its paid for.

The sense that we could be living in the future at any moment was replaced by a foreboding gloom that the Apocalypse is just around the corner.
Which is an odd thing when you realize the cold war ended decades ago.
 
2012-09-20 07:00:23 AM  

aerojockey: GAT_00: Fun fact: the national park system was kept at least in part because people in the '60s expected the low workweek prevalent in the Jetsons, as a counterweight to high productivity and therefore low number of hours necessary to work. So it was expected that by now we'd only be working 10 hours a week or so, and we'd need places to go to keep ourselves entertained with all the time we now have.

Well that's an urban legend and a half.

Of course, it was also expected that multiple people work work the same job to maintain the 40 hour workweek we have now, so if George worked 10 hours, there would be 3 other people with the same job who would work when he didn't. It was expected for some reason that companies would do this and that they weren't evil, soulless bastards.

Because it would be so much better if all the scientists and engineers in the world were instead only working ten hours a week toward human subsistence. Who needs technological and medical advances. How dare the evil corporations force this upon us.


Well that barely made sense.

Let's ask the Daddy of the Space Age what he thinks...
 
2012-09-20 07:11:16 AM  

way south: Somewhere after the 70's, we stopped thinking on how to build the future and started becoming obsessed with how to screw each other in the stock market

we understood the limits of materials and energy sources and discovered that the enormous emptiness that is space doesn't lend itself to the delirious fantasies proposed by the Space Age gurus. Then, instead of benefiting from the technology and energy sources we *DID* have, we *LET* the companies and governments play these games.

It takes two to tango, and as long as people believe we MUST work 40 hours a week even though we have massive amounts of technology, well guess what, most of these jobs will be parasitical.

The 19th century at least was honest about what technology could do, the average worker's workweek went from 100 to 50 hours.

Funny that we can't match that progress anymore now in the 21st century. But hey, we need more lawyers and notaries and various other BS artists to make our lives as complex as possible.

Ever look at how many "jobs" are created for every square foot in a city? The amount of stifling paperwork and Byzantine administrative structures behind real estate?

We don't produce much anymore, but oh boy, if you want to put out a garbage can in front of a condo...
 
2012-09-20 07:21:29 AM  
I was far more upset when I began studying history and found out that The Flintstones is a blatant misrepresentation of ancient man.
 
2012-09-20 07:33:06 AM  

GAT_00: Fun fact: the national park system was kept at least in part because people in the '60s expected the low workweek prevalent in the Jetsons, as a counterweight to high productivity and therefore low number of hours necessary to work. So it was expected that by now we'd only be working 10 hours a week or so, and we'd need places to go to keep ourselves entertained with all the time we now have. Of course, it was also expected that multiple people work work the same job to maintain the 40 hour workweek we have now, so if George worked 10 hours, there would be 3 other people with the same job who would work when he didn't. It was expected for some reason that companies would do this and that they weren't evil, soulless bastards.


Two more decades and we'll need to look at solutions like that. Sure the futurists were wrong about how quickly most corporate workers would be replaced by robots, but it's still happening. And this is the decade where we turn a Moore's Law-type growth loose on robot manufacture. A little Googling will show you how many fully robotic factories making robot parts have opened in the past few years. Production is ramping up so fast now Foxconn has already ordered 1,000,000 robots over 3 years to replace Chinese workers.

The infamous flying cars were also only delayed. Obsessed people like Paul Moller have demonstrated that we can build flying cars if we want to. Several companies have sold personal helicopters for ages. But there isn't enough demand to bring the cost down because helicopters and Skycars are unstable and so are dangerous and hard to fly compared to personal airplanes. Automate those problems away, and backyard helicopters will become a new upper-middle-class status symbol overnight.

The funny thing is, both those things turned out to be the same problem. Both boiled down to, "How do we make robots safe enough to interact with the general public?" And that problem is now sufficiently solved that the EU has certification standards for such robots now and Nevada is letting robot cars drive on the streets.

I have faith it'll all result in a better world. But we're all in for some terrible future shock during the transition. Well, probably not me, but the younger folk. :)
 
2012-09-20 07:33:22 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: we understood the limits of materials and energy sources and discovered that the enormous emptiness that is space doesn't lend itself to the delirious fantasies proposed by the Space Age gurus. Then, instead of benefiting from the technology and energy sources we *DID* have, we *LET* the companies and governments play these games.


The needed technologies existed. You are entitled to your opinion on the matter, but you can't argue against the engineering. Going places in space or living in far off locations is now just a matter of doing the math and building things. We wrote off alot of technology because of fears that it might have undesirable side effects, but that didn't make the goals impossible, just more difficult.
.
Companies make the choices they did because they want more money, and not for any love of mankind or long term vision. Governments make the choices they do because they want to be popular with the people who have money, and from there they can afford to craft any public image they need to be elected.
The creation of jobs is just another part of the image crafting. They need a statistic that says "more were made" and don't really care if it was more telephone sanitation experts. The fighting of wars is another part. It doesn't matter where we go or who we kill, the act of doing it makes you appear tough on the subject.

In the days before, people required monuments as proof their government was powerful and healthy. Stone cuttings and pyramids became bullet trains, bridges, skyscrapers and spacecraft. All visible examples of how great a nation has become.

Now we only require statistics.
...and statistics you will have.
 
2012-09-20 07:34:09 AM  
David Byrne said that in the future women would have breasts all over. That was almost 30 years ago and I'm still waiting patiently for multi-breasted women.

Growing up in the 70s I was trained by an endless series of apocalyptic, last-man-on-Earth films to believe that the world would end long before I had to think about retirement. Instead of scattered bands of hardened scavengers living amid the ruins with lots of guns and unaccountably well groomed women in ragged clothes, we now have 7 billion disappointingly well behaved people and NO nuke-ravaged wastelands. North America is not under the control of sunburnt bandits and mutants, but fat cubicle dwellers who don't know how to make a fist and call the police when somebody says something "inappropriate".

I know I shouldn't be disappointed that WW3 never happened, but it's hard not to be.
 
2012-09-20 07:38:51 AM  

aerojockey: You know you're an obsessed open source fanboy when you follow-up to a post that has absolutely nothing to do with software freedom, simply because someone name-dropped a piece of commercial software in the post.


Huh? You said that in a 10 hour workweek we would be stuck using outdated software (Windows 5.0), because people would put their energy towards developing better platforms (i7 processors). My point was that in a 10 hour workweek, people would have more time to work on open source projects.
 
2012-09-20 07:40:39 AM  

way south: Quantum Apostrophe: we understood the limits of materials and energy sources and discovered that the enormous emptiness that is space doesn't lend itself to the delirious fantasies proposed by the Space Age gurus. Then, instead of benefiting from the technology and energy sources we *DID* have, we *LET* the companies and governments play these games.

The needed technologies existed. You are entitled to your opinion on the matter, but you can't argue against the engineering. Going places in space or living in far off locations is now just a matter of doing the math and building things. We wrote off alot of technology because of fears that it might have undesirable side effects, but that didn't make the goals impossible, just more difficult.
.
Companies make the choices they did because they want more money, and not for any love of mankind or long term vision. Governments make the choices they do because they want to be popular with the people who have money, and from there they can afford to craft any public image they need to be elected.
The creation of jobs is just another part of the image crafting. They need a statistic that says "more were made" and don't really care if it was more telephone sanitation experts. The fighting of wars is another part. It doesn't matter where we go or who we kill, the act of doing it makes you appear tough on the subject.

In the days before, people required monuments as proof their government was powerful and healthy. Stone cuttings and pyramids became bullet trains, bridges, skyscrapers and spacecraft. All visible examples of how great a nation has become.

Now we only require statistics.
...and statistics you will have.


How long would it take for you to realize you are wrong? How many more decades of nothing happening in space until you understand real-life engineering is nothing like sci-fi? That "statistics" don't move mass?
 
2012-09-20 07:51:58 AM  
asking why we don't have flying cars is about as short-sighted as asking why we don't have walking cars

cars are made to move the masses, a flying car is no longer a flying car it is a personal learjet with 4 wheels
 
2012-09-20 08:03:06 AM  

BarkingUnicorn: By definition, the future never arrives.

This author seems to be about 12 years old and stuck there.


Welcome to the world of idioms.
 
2012-09-20 08:06:18 AM  
If only we had a robot that could clean our house, flat tvs that hang from the wall, video chat instead of phones, tanning beds or a moving sidewalk of some sorts. Yup darn shame all those things in the Jetsons never got made.

The author needs to admit it they are just upset we don't have flying cars.
 
2012-09-20 08:12:57 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: That "statistics" don't move mass?


Never watched Fox News, eh? Don't blame you actually....
 
2012-09-20 08:18:39 AM  
Errr... was I the only one to notice that the sketch of the family in the article includes the daughter's vajayjay???
 
2012-09-20 08:25:44 AM  
I've been looking for 40s and 50s depictions of the future to decorate my new apartment. The limitless possibilities those people imagined is truly inspiring to me.
 
2012-09-20 08:29:43 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: aerojockey: Then we are stuck using Word 5.0

Yes, because no one makes good software for free. Now if you'll excuse me, I need to close Firefox and go back to writing in LibreOffice on my computer running Linux Mint so I have time to edit some pictures in GIMP.


he said GOOD software...

/ducks
//hey, ducks!
///has linux mint on my netbook so...
 
2012-09-20 08:31:16 AM  

Invisible Dynamite Monkey: I've been looking for 40s and 50s depictions of the future to decorate my new apartment. The limitless possibilities those people imagined is truly inspiring to me.


That's what happens when you live in an age where the middle class is growing, inequality is shrinking and people have hope for the future. If you want to decorate based on what we think the future is now you'd have a choice between The Road and Hunger Games.
 
2012-09-20 08:32:18 AM  

FunkOut: aerojockey: GAT_00: Fun fact: the national park system was kept at least in part because people in the '60s expected the low workweek prevalent in the Jetsons, as a counterweight to high productivity and therefore low number of hours necessary to work. So it was expected that by now we'd only be working 10 hours a week or so, and we'd need places to go to keep ourselves entertained with all the time we now have.

Well that's an urban legend and a half.

Of course, it was also expected that multiple people work work the same job to maintain the 40 hour workweek we have now, so if George worked 10 hours, there would be 3 other people with the same job who would work when he didn't. It was expected for some reason that companies would do this and that they weren't evil, soulless bastards.

Because it would be so much better if all the scientists and engineers in the world were instead only working ten hours a week toward human subsistence. Who needs technological and medical advances. How dare the evil corporations force this upon us.

Well, I'm totally convinced because of the bold letters.

How about they actually find the smart people early on and give them a better education instead of tacking on a few extra credit book reports and having them do a bit of college math in high school? The current system seems to be designed to crush creativity, waste intelligence, and make many talented people work useless cog making jobs.


That's all right. When they graduate, they'll find he job going to some kid from China who will work for half a paycheck. So why bother educating Americans?
 
2012-09-20 08:53:58 AM  
No love for Jonathan Coulton?
 
2012-09-20 09:04:32 AM  

FunkOut: How about they actually find the smart people early on and give them a better education instead of tacking on a few extra credit book reports and having them do a bit of college math in high school? The current system seems to be designed to crush creativity, waste intelligence, and make many talented people work useless cog making jobs.


It sounds cruel which is why I don't say this in polite company and only as a faceless username on the internets, but we need to spend less on special education and put that money towards advanced education.
 
2012-09-20 09:11:16 AM  

Wenchmaster: No love for Jonathan Coulton?


Yes

/just because
 
2012-09-20 09:13:31 AM  

gingerjet: Mugato: James Cameron talks about the future of interactive movies. ("There might be a certain amount of interactivity, so when you look around, it creates that image wherever you look," Cameron says. He concedes it is far off: "You're talking 'Jetsons' here.")

Oh shut the fark up, Cameron. Your so called innovations in moviemaking are bullshiat. Take a look at my reel though. EIP.

Cameron has done some amazing things in film making. Not the actual movies mind you - but in the technology that goes into making them and he deserves credit for that. However - he is wrong that people care about interactivity. This dream of people choosing their own paths through stories have been proven wrong and wrong again. Most people don't want to work at their entertainment - they just want to sit there, watch reality shows, and drink beer.


Except video games. Yeah. Video games that make more money than movies.

Sorry, but that was a pile of pants on head retarded that just came out of your mouth.
 
2012-09-20 09:15:04 AM  

yourmomlovestetris: although I do envy her all the free time she seemed to have....


Lets see, 50's/60's... was that Barb's or Valium as the 'mothers little helper' of the time? Jane Jetson wasn't bored per say... she was off her tits and flying far higher than the car could.

In fact Rosie's sole reason to exist seems to of been to allow Jane Jetson to drug herself up 24/7 and not have the house fall apart.
 
2012-09-20 09:19:06 AM  
"This new millennium sucks! It's exactly the same as the old millennium! You know why? No flying cars!"

i.imgur.com
 
2012-09-20 09:35:46 AM  
TFA: but today "The Jetsons" stands as the single most important piece of 20th century futurism.

No, that would be Star Trek. Easily.

Think how much real-world tech and gadgets were inspired by Star Trek. And still are. Think how many scientists and engineers chose their field because of Star Trek.

The Jetsons is an interesting 60s pop cultural artifact, but it has not had even remotely the same real world impact or hold on the public imagination that Star Trek has had.
 
2012-09-20 09:36:06 AM  

davynelson: Life in the Air Age, it's all highways in the sky... 

[www.the5uk.com image 464x466] 

/hot as hell
//click username for link to world's greatest lo-fi psychedelic tune


Am I the only one that noticed the chick is completely naked in this pic?
 
2012-09-20 09:37:24 AM  

Kurmudgeon: Yeah, the future never arrived while I talk to you all on my computer from wherever you are located anywhere on the world. I'm going to go read something about transplants now. They've became quite mundane.


This.

In many ways we living in the future. I carry a powerful computer in my pocket that allows me to make video calls, take pictures, access the vast sum of human knowledge, record video, download and read books, translate other languages and communicate with people all over the world.* We watched a video, taken by a robot, of a robot landing on another planet. You can build a machine in your own home that can fabricate intricate parts and machines, even copies of itself. The deaf can hear and the blind can see (a little). It truly is an amazing time to be alive.

*I mostly use it to fling irate avians at larcenous swine.
 
2012-09-20 09:43:00 AM  

SuperChuck: davynelson: Life in the Air Age, it's all highways in the sky... 

[www.the5uk.com image 464x466] 

/hot as hell
//click username for link to world's greatest lo-fi psychedelic tune

Am I the only one that noticed the chick is completely naked in this pic?


Am I the only one that noticed that Judy Jetson is sporting some serious camel toe in the sketch that accompanies TFA?
 
2012-09-20 10:00:06 AM  
Rats Rall Right Reorge
 
2012-09-20 10:09:23 AM  

stevetherobot: Kurmudgeon: Yeah, the future never arrived while I talk to you all on my computer from wherever you are located anywhere on the world. I'm going to go read something about transplants now. They've became quite mundane.

This.

In many ways we living in the future. I carry a powerful computer in my pocket that allows me to make video calls, take pictures, access the vast sum of human knowledge, record video, download and read books, translate other languages and communicate with people all over the world.* We watched a video, taken by a robot, of a robot landing on another planet. You can build a machine in your own home that can fabricate intricate parts and machines, even copies of itself. The deaf can hear and the blind can see (a little). It truly is an amazing time to be alive.

*I mostly use it to fling irate avians at larcenous swine.


Louis CK had a good bit about how ridiculous it is that people biatch about things like smartphones and air travel.

The fact that we have these things and capabilities is practically miraculous. You can sit on chair in a metal airship hurtling you through the sky at incredible speeds to any city in the world, and while doing so you can play with an incredibly powerful pocket computer that can give you chess to any book, music, film, etc. we would seem godlike to people of only a couple centuries ago. And yet we take these thins for granted and frequently biatch about the experience.
 
2012-09-20 10:27:44 AM  
I feel far more betrayed by the Flintstones and the past that never was.
 
2012-09-20 10:35:50 AM  
Fun Fact: The Jetsons live one year before Zefram Cochrane made his first warp flight.
 
2012-09-20 10:43:45 AM  
The Jetsons' house is very zombie apocalypse proof. Impossible climb for ground based hordes.
 
2012-09-20 10:55:20 AM  
While a pretty well-thought out read, TFA forgets one thing: The Jetsons were an attempt to mine Flintstones-like comedy in the other direction. It's just not as much fun to make a robot, or computerized gadget to wash dishes as it is to build a contraption out of stones, sticks, fuzzy small animals, clam shells, lizards, and at least one medium-sized critter to say, "Eh, it's a living!"
 
2012-09-20 11:07:06 AM  

stevetherobot: Kurmudgeon: Yeah, the future never arrived while I talk to you all on my computer from wherever you are located anywhere on the world. I'm going to go read something about transplants now. They've became quite mundane.

This.

In many ways we living in the future. I carry a powerful computer in my pocket that allows me to make video calls, take pictures, access the vast sum of human knowledge, record video, download and read books, translate other languages and communicate with people all over the world.* We watched a video, taken by a robot, of a robot landing on another planet. You can build a machine in your own home that can fabricate intricate parts and machines, even copies of itself. The deaf can hear and the blind can see (a little). It truly is an amazing time to be alive.

*I mostly use it to fling irate avians at larcenous swine.


It's all about what we value. In the 50s and 60s we valued beating the Soviets and so we focused our technological advances on space and weapons. As the Cold War wound down in the 70s and 80s, we started focusing in other areas. In the past three decades we've seen a communications revolution that has connected 90% of the world with each other. We've also seen tremendous advances in medical technology.

Many of our technological advances (as well as other changes) have made former futuristic technologies redundant. The flying car was killed by both airline deregulation and the communications revolution/computer. The former lowered flight prices significantly and also sparked the creation of many regional airports. The latter allows us to telecommute and reduces the need for long-distance travel in general.

The problem with works that try to anticipate the future is that they can never know what priorities future people will have.
 
2012-09-20 12:13:16 PM  

Invisible Dynamite Monkey: I've been looking for 40s and 50s depictions of the future to decorate my new apartment. The limitless possibilities those people imagined is truly inspiring to me.


You can go to any chuckle ward and people there imagine all kinds of possibilities too. It's not that inspiring.

rugman11: In the 50s and 60s we valued beating the Soviets and so we focused our technological advances on space and weapons.


Actually, WWII caused that and we coasted on that for a few decades.

rugman11: As the Cold War wound down in the 70s and 80s, we started focusing in other areas. In the past three decades we've seen a communications revolution that has connected 90% of the world with each other. We've also seen tremendous advances in medical technology.


Say, did you notice that communications and medicine are basically about information, and don't need much in terms of materials and energy?

Can you fly an airplane from the '50s? Will it still go as high and as fast? Would people recognize it as a plane today? How about a computer from the '50s? What's the difference here? Is it because we hit the peak early of what can be done with real materials and real energy sources?
 
2012-09-20 01:19:08 PM  

FunkOut: aerojockey: It's not like anyone travels back in time by spinning a wheel real fast.

I tried a time machine that used a lever once but just ended up really far away.


globalnerdy.com

/Forgot the crystals, didn't you?
 
2012-09-20 01:25:00 PM  
Flying cars, seriously? I want a male robot sex toy.
 
2012-09-20 01:27:04 PM  
Flying cars, seriously? I want a male robot sex toy who wears what I want him to wear and access to my bank account so he give me my money when I ask for it.
 
2012-09-20 01:40:49 PM  

alice_600: Flying cars, seriously? I want a male robot sex toy who wears what I want him to wear and access to my bank account so he give me my money when I ask for it.


How YOU doin'?
 
2012-09-20 02:10:34 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Where's my frikkin flying CAR?

/I'd like to beat George Jetson


Well, I do know some german scientists that would like to talk to you...

/Left or right foot?
 
2012-09-20 02:10:55 PM  

Beowoolfie: Sure the futurists were wrong about how quickly most corporate workers would be replaced by robots


What is Amazon.com if not a giant robot shipping people the things they want?
 
2012-09-20 02:22:13 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: way south: Somewhere after the 70's, we stopped thinking on how to build the future and started becoming obsessed with how to screw each other in the stock market we understood the limits of materials and energy sources and discovered that the enormous emptiness that is space doesn't lend itself to the delirious fantasies proposed by the Space Age gurus. Then, instead of benefiting from the technology and energy sources we *DID* have, we *LET* the companies and governments play these games.

It takes two to tango, and as long as people believe we MUST work 40 hours a week even though we have massive amounts of technology, well guess what, most of these jobs will be parasitical.

The 19th century at least was honest about what technology could do, the average worker's workweek went from 100 to 50 hours.

Funny that we can't match that progress anymore now in the 21st century. But hey, we need more lawyers and notaries and various other BS artists to make our lives as complex as possible.

Ever look at how many "jobs" are created for every square foot in a city? The amount of stifling paperwork and Byzantine administrative structures behind real estate?

We don't produce much anymore, but oh boy, if you want to put out a garbage can in front of a condo...


I'm willing to bet that you could live the same quality of life that people had in the 40s by working around 10-15 hours a week.

No health insurance, no cell phone, no cable, 800 square feet of living space, sew your own clothes, eat meat no more than twice a week and cook everything at home, etc.
 
2012-09-20 03:06:06 PM  

Optimal_Illusion: While a pretty well-thought out read, TFA forgets one thing: The Jetsons were an attempt to mine Flintstones-like comedy in the other direction. It's just not as much fun to make a robot, or computerized gadget to wash dishes as it is to build a contraption out of stones, sticks, fuzzy small animals, clam shells, lizards, and at least one medium-sized critter to say, "Eh, it's a living!"


I think it's just another example of the humor running in the other direction. In the Flintstones, primitive materials and animals do remarkable things. In the Jetsons, incredibly advanced technology breaks down and goes haywire
 
2012-09-20 03:16:46 PM  
The original seris was great, but the 80s reboot sucked.
 
2012-09-20 03:27:35 PM  

ertznay: The original seris was great, but the 80s reboot sucked.


All 80's reboots sucked. I'd still like to strangle the people responsible for 1980's Looney Toons.
 
2012-09-20 04:57:11 PM  
The thing with the Jetsons and most other "space age" depictions of the future is that they forget the past.

My house was built in 1950. It will almost certainly still be standing in 2050 and 2150 and 2750. The basic infrastructure of most cities will be very similar in the future to the present, with houses and shopping malls and offices surrounded by roads and sidewalks. There won't be houses in the sky with flying cars to get from one to the other.

Computing power evolved differently. Instead of sentient and semi-sentient computers and robots (although some things are approaching that), we have computers that can do amazing calculations and display amazing graphics on a non-sentient level.
 
2012-09-20 05:56:08 PM  
Let's be honest - it was because scientists finally stepped back..and realized treadmills with few safety features suspended thousands of feet in the air are about as socially responsible as lawn darts..
 
2012-09-20 06:29:23 PM  
I think one of the Cracked writers mentioned that they never show the ground, which could be a radioactive disease-ridden hellscape.
 
2012-09-20 07:09:38 PM  
the artists drew inspiration from futurist books of the time, including the 1962 book 1975: And the Changes to Come, by Arnold B. Barach (who envisioned such breakthroughs as ultrasonic dishwashers and instant language translators).

i1.sndcdn.com

The future is here.
 
2012-09-20 07:10:02 PM  

Somaticasual: Let's be honest - it was because scientists finally stepped back..and realized treadmills with few safety features suspended thousands of feet in the air are about as socially responsible as lawn darts..


All those futurists that predicted sterile white cities with balconies standing over 1000 foot drops didn't plan for drunks and assholes to be with us till the end of time. In fact, it seems that only dystopias seem to take into account humanity's propensity to have one asshole ruin things for everyone else, and often times even they don't realize how easily their future tech could be turned to griefing.
 
2012-09-20 08:14:41 PM  
What killed the flying car?

Nannyism: "That's too dangerous for you to have."

"Shut up, or I aim the black-powder potato gun AT YOUR FACE."

"I'm just being responsible!"

"So am I, you are standing in the way of progress."
 
2012-09-20 10:35:45 PM  
Anybody that desperately wants a flying car: what is stopping you from getting a pilot's license and an airplane?
 
2012-09-20 10:52:49 PM  

alice_600: Flying cars, seriously? I want a male robot sex toy who wears what I want him to wear and access to my bank account so he give me my money when I ask for it.


Couldn't you just bolt a Sybian onto the front of an ATM machine and then drape a tuxedo over it?
 
2012-09-20 11:17:00 PM  

aerojockey: aerojockey: 10 hour work weeks is a dream. When we (i.e. society) gain efficiency, we don't put it toward liesure time, we put to toward greater progress. Just like the idea that faster computers with more memory are going to make our computers work faster. It doesn't happen that way: the computers get more powerful and complex, but they still sit there for 20 seconds unresponsive loading drivers or starting a word processor.

Come to think of it, these two problems cancel out. We just tell all the software engineers to work only ten hours (which of course would have a cascading effect all over the workforce, so that everyone has more free time). Then we are stuck using Word 5.0, which will run blazing fast on a recent Intel i7 system. Course, we'll have to kidnap the hardware engineers and force them to continue working long hours.

FunkOut: What we need are time machines.

Have you ever noticed that time machines are rarely ever machines? I mean, they might have mechanical parts to support the time travel apparatus, but the actual time travel is done by some kind of non-mechanical force field. It's not like anyone travels back in time by spinning a wheel real fast.


I can time travel at a rate of 1 second per second, I can go at 2 seconds per second, but it takes twice as long.
 
2012-09-21 12:33:32 AM  

Now That's What I Call a Taco!: Anybody that desperately wants a flying car: what is stopping you from getting a pilot's license and an airplane?


Expense, Skill, and Bureaucracy. Alot of people can't pull themselves past the bar to own and operate a normal plane, or they simply don't want the hassle.
What the flying car represents isn't so much a car that flies as it is a concept of convenient, simple, and affordable air travel for everyone.

dl.dropbox.com

Engineering wise it isn't difficult to achieve. Powered lift vehicle prototypes were common before the helicopter became a big hit.
The problem is once you get the FAA and lawyers involved, You go from a thing that could be learned and in an afternoon to a paperwork pig that takes multiple licenses.

Its no longer a flying car, just another aircraft.
There isn't as much commercial interest in that.
 
2012-09-21 01:54:57 AM  
i.imgur.com

/Eh, not sure where I was going with this.
 
2012-09-21 09:49:09 PM  

ShannonKW: David Byrne said that in the future women would have breasts all over. That was almost 30 years ago and I'm still waiting patiently for multi-breasted women.


He also said, "If you can think of it, if you can imagine it, it exists somewhere". Ergo, you haven't looked hard enough for them.
 
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