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(Slicing Up Eyeballs)   REM's Peter Buck plugs vinyl-only solo album, which he says won't be in Wal-Mart but can soon be found in record stores next to the solo albums from Andrew Ridgeley, Tony Banks and Art Garfunkel   (slicingupeyeballs.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Art Garfunkel, Andrew Ridgeley, R. E. M, Wal-Mart, record store, guitar solo, Scott McCaughey  
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469 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 19 Sep 2012 at 2:19 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-19 02:22:11 PM  
lol!


At least it's not titled Lefty.
 
2012-09-19 02:31:05 PM  
What a Tony Banks solo record might look like:

cdn.bleacherreport.net
 
2012-09-19 02:31:10 PM  
Vinyl? Sheet music? Meh.

How about wax cylinders? 8-track? Or Game Boy? Now THERE'S some retro.
 
2012-09-19 02:36:49 PM  
Equating Peter Buck with Andrew Ridgely is trolling plain and simple. I hate you subby.
 
2012-09-19 02:40:23 PM  
TFA: But she didn't just hole herself up in the treetops --

I giggled.
 
2012-09-19 02:40:59 PM  

amindtat: TFA: But she didn't just hole herself up in the treetops --

I giggled.


...and posted in the wrong thread.

/facepalm
 
2012-09-19 02:42:34 PM  
Tony Banks, LOL! Could never get out of the shadow of the rest of his Genesis mates!
 
2012-09-19 02:42:36 PM  
I'll have to get out the old Victrola.
 
2012-09-19 02:46:35 PM  

Erodeo: Equating Peter Buck with Andrew Ridgely is trolling plain and simple. I hate you subby.


+ equating Art with the Ridgely is bullshiat.

/He has a lovely singing voice and his mustache is a young Paul Simon

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-09-19 02:47:47 PM  
Releasing a vinyl only record is so 2001. Then again, REM has always been about a decade behind.
 
2012-09-19 02:49:58 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Releasing a vinyl only record is so 2001. Then again, REM has always been about a decade behind.


...or ahead depending on whether you are a fan or not.
 
2012-09-19 03:09:26 PM  
I swear to you this is a true fact: I helped to talk Peter Buck into buying his first CD player, back in 1985.

/seriously
 
2012-09-19 03:27:18 PM  

Mr_Fabulous: I swear to you this is a true fact: I helped to talk Peter Buck into buying his first CD player, back in 1985.

/seriously


...and he's regretted it ever since.

apparently.
 
2012-09-19 03:35:03 PM  

Kell Bartok: Tony Banks, LOL! Could never get out of the shadow of the rest of his Genesis mates!


Kind of like Andy Summers or Stuart Copeland, post-Police career. To be fair, both of them and Tony Banks have a few movie scores to their credit, so there's that. I think I still have Copeland's "2010: Odyssey II" soundtrack on tape somewhere around here.

Erodeo: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Releasing a vinyl only record is so 2001. Then again, REM has always been about a decade behind.

...or ahead depending on whether you are a fan or not.


Dude, even most fans agree that post-"Monster", they were washed up, and even then, the fan camp is split over Monster itself. The trio with the drum machine? WORTHLESS. Totally irrelevant: I saw a Michael Stipe bronze sculpture of a circle of Foxes in Atlanta a couple of summers ago. I'm thinking he should stick to music.

Genesis without Gabriel/Collins is a lot like that Fleetwood Mac album "Time"... pure dreck. That's a damned shame really, since Phil Face wasn't exactly the most creative member of the band, but it has become increasingly clear to me over the decades that sometimes, when you take even the least productive but tempering member out of a group, the parts are indeed less than the whole.
 
2012-09-19 04:32:26 PM  
Longtime REM fan of all areas here (including Monster up trough thefinal album). I wasn't too thrilled with the one track I have heard from this, but I will pick it up anyway as a thank-you to Mr. Buck for all the great music he's helped give the fans (and for teaching me all about restraint on the guitar).
 
2012-09-19 04:59:00 PM  

thespindrifter: Dude, even most fans agree that post-"Monster", they were washed up, and even then, the fan camp is split over Monster itself. The trio with the drum machine? WORTHLESS.


Post-Monster was mostly bad, and I find little to recommend Monster itself, but I do like New Adventures in Hi-Fi.
 
2012-09-19 05:01:07 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Releasing a vinyl only record is so 2001. Then again, REM has always been about a decade behind.


Watched Peter Buck and Scott McCaughey play for a crowd of about 20 people at a baseball game last spring (2011) with the Baseball Project. It was a sad thing to see. Made R.E.M. seem futuristic in comparison.
 
2012-09-19 05:16:32 PM  
Isn't he kind of old to be a hipster douchebag?
 
2012-09-19 05:34:25 PM  

Mugato: Isn't he kind of old to be a hipster douchebag?


He was a hipster before it was cool.
 
2012-09-19 05:36:57 PM  

MacWizard: Watched Peter Buck and Scott McCaughey play for a crowd of about 20 people at a baseball game last spring (2011) with the Baseball Project. It was a sad thing to see. Made R.E.M. seem futuristic in comparison.



Yeah, he played a record store in my neighborhood with them awhile back.  I'm sure maybe 20 people showed up.  But no one friggin' told me until it was over!
 
2012-09-19 05:50:03 PM  
Link

linked song:
Tony Banks has made exactly ONE good song that I've heard of so far (and yes, I've listened to all of "A Curious Feeling")

/if you like the ABACAB album, you'll probably like the link!
 
2012-09-19 05:51:11 PM  

downstairs: MacWizard: Watched Peter Buck and Scott McCaughey play for a crowd of about 20 people at a baseball game last spring (2011) with the Baseball Project. It was a sad thing to see. Made R.E.M. seem futuristic in comparison.

Yeah, he played a record store in my neighborhood with them awhile back.  I'm sure maybe 20 people showed up.  But no one friggin' told me until it was over!


You didn't miss anything. There were about 4000-5000 people at the baseball game (spring training -- either a White Sox or Dodgers game). I knew it was Peter Buck because I was working security and had been told to make sure people didn't hassle him. It wasn't a problem because no one was even interested. The band was playing near the main gate while the crowd was coming in and only 20 people or so at a time would watch. They only played really, really bad songs about baseball.
 
2012-09-19 05:51:25 PM  
Really though, do people still exist who actually think that vinyl sounds better? And even if it did to the point that human ears could perceive it, would that really apply to rock music or whatever the fark REM thinks they play?
 
2012-09-19 05:55:44 PM  
No love for John Oates?
 
2012-09-19 05:56:16 PM  
Mr_Fabulous: I swear to you this is a true fact: I helped to talk Peter Buck into buying his first CD player, back in 1985.

/seriously


Was he as much of an asshole in real life as I've heard?
 
2012-09-19 06:14:16 PM  
I met Peter Buck in 2001 at Amoeba Records. He was a really nice guy and he was there to see GBV. So yeah, awesome. Have you read the liner notes to Dead Letter Office? The guy doesn't take himself too seriously.
 
2012-09-19 06:27:01 PM  

Erodeo: I met Peter Buck in 2001 at Amoeba Records. He was a really nice guy and he was there to see GBV. So yeah, awesome. Have you read the liner notes to Dead Letter Office? The guy doesn't take himself too seriously.


I sold Peter Buck a stack of DVDs the day before he had his infamous mid-air meltdown. Yep, he is really nice. He said something about doing a bunch of work-related travel, and wanted some movies to watch while flying. I didn't quite place him till he handed me his credit card, then I thought, "Ah, that's right, he lives here in town." Two days later I opened a newspaper and went, "Holy shiat! What were those DVDs?"
 
2012-09-19 06:51:35 PM  

MacWizard: downstairs: MacWizard: Watched Peter Buck and Scott McCaughey play for a crowd of about 20 people at a baseball game last spring (2011) with the Baseball Project. It was a sad thing to see. Made R.E.M. seem futuristic in comparison.

Yeah, he played a record store in my neighborhood with them awhile back.  I'm sure maybe 20 people showed up.  But no one friggin' told me until it was over!

You didn't miss anything. There were about 4000-5000 people at the baseball game (spring training -- either a White Sox or Dodgers game). I knew it was Peter Buck because I was working security and had been told to make sure people didn't hassle him. It wasn't a problem because no one was even interested. The band was playing near the main gate while the crowd was coming in and only 20 people or so at a time would watch. They only played really, really bad songs about baseball.



Yeah, I know.  I'm not a big fan of the music, just saying I'd get to hang with Peter Buck... because so few people were there that I'm sure he hung around afterwards and chatted with everyone.  Apparently it was a favor for the owner or something.  The store is tiny.
 
2012-09-19 07:20:38 PM  
Tony Banks' 2 classical albums are amazing pieces of work. I may be the only guy in the world who can honestly say he's my favorite member of Genesis.

Tony Banks - The Ram
 
2012-09-19 07:39:33 PM  

Erodeo: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Releasing a vinyl only record is so 2001. Then again, REM has always been about a decade behind.

...or ahead depending on whether you are a fan or not.


I didn't mean it as a criticism necessarily, just an observation.
 
2012-09-19 08:07:17 PM  
That's pretty cool and kinda comparable with when Dave Navarro used to make stuff on a Tascam and then go package up a few copies and sell it at his local record store. It's basically what should be done after a successful career- he played the pop hits and now it's time to record and put out whatever he wants.
 
2012-09-19 08:11:42 PM  

Third_Uncle_Eno: Tony Banks has made exactly ONE good song that I've heard of so far


He sounds like the long-lost straight Pet Shop Boy.

It worked when he sang backing harmonies for Phil, though. He even gets a spot in the clear at the end of "A Trick of the Tail." The hello-friend-welcome-home bit is Tony.
 
2012-09-19 08:45:25 PM  
Does it come with a sixer of PBR?
 
2012-09-19 09:29:25 PM  

Gulper Eel
[TotalFark]


Third_Uncle_Eno: Tony Banks has made exactly ONE good song that I've heard of so far

He sounds like the long-lost straight Pet Shop Boy.

It worked when he sang backing harmonies for Phil, though. He even gets a spot in the clear at the end of "A Trick of the Tail." The hello-friend-welcome-home bit is Tony.


hahaha that's a good 'voice-connection', never thought of that one before!
(I always thought he sounded like Al Stewart on "this is love")

Also, he does harmony /co-lead vocals with Peter on "the Shepard", in 1970. (a 'trespass' outtake)


/p.s. I thought one Pet Shop Boy (vocals guy) was gay, the other was straight.....
 
2012-09-19 09:38:46 PM  

Erodeo: Equating Peter Buck with Andrew Ridgely is trolling plain and simple. I hate you subby.


Oh man, I know. I hope Andrew Ridgely didn't read that, he'd be embarrassed as hell!
 
2012-09-19 09:58:49 PM  
He's only being pretentious because he can afford it.
 
2012-09-19 10:08:19 PM  

Third_Uncle_Eno: Tony Banks has made exactly ONE good song that I've heard of so far (and yes, I've listened to all of "A Curious Feeling")


Shortcut to Somewhere with the Fish on vocals was pretty decent in my opinion.
 
2012-09-20 12:22:14 AM  
I for one would love to go to that groovy little Baja town Todos Santos and check out his music festival. Sounds like a hell of a fun week(end).
 
2012-09-20 01:23:51 AM  
I guess he doesn't want anyone to hear it.

Seriously, vinyl only is a nice idea-back when I had a serviceable one. But I'm not going to go out and try find a turntable just to listen to it.
 
2012-09-20 02:33:36 AM  
Which one was Peter Buck? Was he the "cute one?"
 
2012-09-20 02:43:26 AM  

thespindrifter: Kell Bartok: Tony Banks, LOL! Could never get out of the shadow of the rest of his Genesis mates!

Kind of like Andy Summers or Stuart Copeland, post-Police career. To be fair, both of them and Tony Banks have a few movie scores to their credit, so there's that. I think I still have Copeland's "2010: Odyssey II" soundtrack on tape somewhere around here.

Erodeo: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Releasing a vinyl only record is so 2001. Then again, REM has always been about a decade behind.

...or ahead depending on whether you are a fan or not.

Dude, even most fans agree that post-"Monster", they were washed up, and even then, the fan camp is split over Monster itself. The trio with the drum machine? WORTHLESS. Totally irrelevant: I saw a Michael Stipe bronze sculpture of a circle of Foxes in Atlanta a couple of summers ago. I'm thinking he should stick to music.

Genesis without Gabriel/Collins is a lot like that Fleetwood Mac album "Time"... pure dreck. That's a damned shame really, since Phil Face wasn't exactly the most creative member of the band, but it has become increasingly clear to me over the decades that sometimes, when you take even the least productive but tempering member out of a group, the parts are indeed less than the whole.


I think you and I would have much to talk about. I had a couple of Steward Copland's tapes some years ago (The Equalizer and The Rhythmist) and thought they were quite interesting. I loved the Police, but I hate Sting on his own. As for Genesis, I find anything post-Hackett to be mildly interesting at best. I think as long as Tony Banks had Rutherford and Hackett to round out his writing he did quite well (e.g. Firth of Fifth, In That Quiet Earth...).
 
2012-09-20 02:51:50 AM  

Bukharin: Mugato: Isn't he kind of old to be a hipster douchebag?

He was a hipster before it was cool.

t3.gstatic.com
 
2012-09-20 10:05:30 AM  
Mugato:

"Really though, do people still exist who actually think that vinyl sounds better? And even if it did to the point that human ears could perceive it, would that really apply to rock music or whatever the fark REM thinks they play?"

The people who think vinyl sounds better:

1) Have good quality, properly set up playback equipment
2) Have genuinely clean records

The people who think vinyl sucks, don't. It's that simple.

Having a plastic $100 Best Buy USB turntable and a stylus you've been playing records with for 10 years is not good quality, properly set up playback equipment. And running a velvet brush around your records when they look like someone dumped the contents of a vacuum cleaner on them does not result in genuinely clean records.

People play their grungy, banged up records on their Crosley record player they bought at Wal-Mart with a sapphire needle and a plastic tonearm, and they wonder why others listen to vinyl...

You don't have to spend a fortune on stereo equipment to hear the quality that's possible with an LP, but it does require a bit of a commitment to doing it, and a desire to get the best out of your records to make that happen. It's perfectly fine to not want to devote that kind of energy or time to proper care and playback, but for those who do, vinyl can (but not always) be superior to a CD. And it's not always a subtle difference. And that includes rock & pop records.
 
2012-09-20 12:21:31 PM  

GibbyTheMole: Mugato:

"Really though, do people still exist who actually think that vinyl sounds better? And even if it did to the point that human ears could perceive it, would that really apply to rock music or whatever the fark REM thinks they play?"

The people who think vinyl sounds better:

1) Have good quality, properly set up playback equipment
2) Have genuinely clean records

The people who think vinyl sucks, don't. It's that simple.

Having a plastic $100 Best Buy USB turntable and a stylus you've been playing records with for 10 years is not good quality, properly set up playback equipment. And running a velvet brush around your records when they look like someone dumped the contents of a vacuum cleaner on them does not result in genuinely clean records.

People play their grungy, banged up records on their Crosley record player they bought at Wal-Mart with a sapphire needle and a plastic tonearm, and they wonder why others listen to vinyl...

You don't have to spend a fortune on stereo equipment to hear the quality that's possible with an LP, but it does require a bit of a commitment to doing it, and a desire to get the best out of your records to make that happen. It's perfectly fine to not want to devote that kind of energy or time to proper care and playback, but for those who do, vinyl can (but not always) be superior to a CD. And it's not always a subtle difference. And that includes rock & pop records.


Hey, we've found Steven Wilson's alt!

Not true, he's much more dogmatic: he likened listening to an MP3 likely looking at a photocopy of a painting. (He also promoted an album by destroying iPods in creative ways.) Keeps putting out expensive vinyl.

Yeah, well, I only listen to him in highly compressed MP3 format on inexpensive headphones, so the joke's on him!
 
2012-09-20 03:18:27 PM  

GibbyTheMole: Mugato:

"Really though, do people still exist who actually think that vinyl sounds better? And even if it did to the point that human ears could perceive it, would that really apply to rock music or whatever the fark REM thinks they play?"

The people who think vinyl sounds better:

1) Have good quality, properly set up playback equipment
2) Have genuinely clean records

The people who think vinyl sucks, don't. It's that simple.

Having a plastic $100 Best Buy USB turntable and a stylus you've been playing records with for 10 years is not good quality, properly set up playback equipment. And running a velvet brush around your records when they look like someone dumped the contents of a vacuum cleaner on them does not result in genuinely clean records.

People play their grungy, banged up records on their Crosley record player they bought at Wal-Mart with a sapphire needle and a plastic tonearm, and they wonder why others listen to vinyl...

You don't have to spend a fortune on stereo equipment to hear the quality that's possible with an LP, but it does require a bit of a commitment to doing it, and a desire to get the best out of your records to make that happen. It's perfectly fine to not want to devote that kind of energy or time to proper care and playback, but for those who do, vinyl can (but not always) be superior to a CD. And it's not always a subtle difference. And that includes rock & pop records.



Sorry but it's just pure mathematics. CD/digital does a far more accurate job of reproducing the original musical signal. Records might sound warmer or more intimate or whatever but it just doesn't compare ti the accuracy of digital.
 
2012-09-20 09:47:49 PM  
Mugato

Sorry but it's just pure mathematics. CD/digital does a far more accurate job of reproducing the original musical signal. Records might sound warmer or more intimate or whatever but it just doesn't compare ti the accuracy of digital.

You're sort of right, but not for the reason you probably think. The problem isn't with digital as a method of recording, or CDs as an end medium. I have plenty of terrific sounding CDs. I even have plenty of great sounding 320kbps MP3s *gasp!!!* that were ripped from either great sounding CDs, or great sounding LPs.

The reason LPs frequently do sound better than a lot of CDs is because the mastering job sucks on a lot of CDs. There are a lot of reasons for this... In the early days of CD, there was a big rush by the record companies to get the product to market, so they either had inexperienced mastering guys do the work, or did the mastering from bin masters or safety copies. A lot of the actual original multitrack masters had been lost by then, so they had to use what tapes they could get their hands on. And in many cases, depending on the vintage of the original recording, they still do. Sometimes they even reverse EQed the RIAA curve on masters meant for LPs and used those. Plus, a lot of those early digital converters were harsh and brittle. It was still a new technology and it wasn't as advanced as it became just a few years later.

Then there's the loudness issue. One example is "Them Crooked Vultures". I have both the CD, and the vinyl, and the vinyl beats the snot out of the CD because they overcompressed the CD and jacked the volume up to the max when they mastered the damn thing. The vinyl has much more dynamics thanks to less aggressive compression, more detail, and better bass slam. Even my middle-aged ears can easily hear the difference.

Another example is Dave Brubecks "Time Out"... My Legacy "audiophile" CD sounds quite good. But the early original Columbia 6-eye pressing is better. It's more fluid, more detailed, and you can hear the ambience of the room more. The stereo separation is also better.

But you know, a lot of the time, the CD is better. It just depends. Getting the best sound out of whatever format you have available to you is the name of the game.

And in the end, math doesn't matter. It's what you hear that counts. I'm guessing the reason you think vinyl sucks, is because you haven't heard a good record played on a good, properly set up system. Not many people have.
 
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