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(GeekWire)   New iPhone app can monitor lung activity with accuracy near equal to medical equipment costing thousands of dollars. So go ahead and smoke 'em if you got 'em   (geekwire.com) divider line 17
    More: Cool, design engineer, Google TV, computer engineering, oxygen monitor, professional network, job fair, Michael Waltrip Racing, cure monitoring  
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2895 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Sep 2012 at 12:20 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-09-19 09:51:23 AM
 
2012-09-19 10:54:40 AM
If this works it will be farking unbelievable.

/M.D., asthma specialist
 
2012-09-19 12:33:16 PM

notmtwain: App lets you monitor lung health using only a smartphone

// Any old smartphone.


Apple haterz. This article proves why iPhone5 is better. Retina and lungs FTW!

/trololololooo...
 
2012-09-19 12:33:56 PM
If this works, and a version isn't ported to Android...this may actually be the first legitimate reason I have to get an iDevice :D

/asthmatic, and frankly would like to head off trouble before getting to the "nebuliser at the urgent care clinic and/or weeklong prednisone course for REALLY bad flares" level
 
2012-09-19 01:08:22 PM
I am not sure they really have to worry that much about FDA approval for non-clinical use. There are a lot of apps that perform tasks that would historically have been regulated, but the FDA doesn't seem interested. Maybe they are intending clinical use? I could use this to monitor my son's asthma.
 
2012-09-19 01:15:50 PM

GameSprocket: I am not sure they really have to worry that much about FDA approval for non-clinical use. There are a lot of apps that perform tasks that would historically have been regulated, but the FDA doesn't seem interested. Maybe they are intending clinical use? I could use this to monitor my son's asthma.


They probably think they're gonna sell it for $500 a pop or something.
 
2012-09-19 01:24:31 PM
Just used my phone as an exposure rate meter :D Exciting stuff.

lh6.googleusercontent.com
 
2012-09-19 02:00:14 PM

Great Porn Dragon: If this works, and a version isn't ported to Android...this may actually be the first legitimate reason I have to get an iDevice :D

/asthmatic, and frankly would like to head off trouble before getting to the "nebuliser at the urgent care clinic and/or weeklong prednisone course for REALLY bad flares" level


See Boobies.
 
2012-09-19 02:10:08 PM

error 303: Just used my phone as an exposure rate meter :D Exciting stuff.

[lh6.googleusercontent.com image 360x640]


Ok, how the hell does that work? Did smartphones get TLDs imbedded in them when I wasn't looking?
 
2012-09-19 02:19:15 PM

SN1987a goes boom: error 303: Just used my phone as an exposure rate meter :D Exciting stuff.

[lh6.googleusercontent.com image 360x640]

Ok, how the hell does that work? Did smartphones get TLDs imbedded in them when I wasn't looking?


the theory is that you cover up your camera so no visibile light is getting in. That way any "hits" registered by the phones CCD are coming only from high energy radiation. The software does some analysis of the intensity and frequency of "hits" and spits out an exposure rate. So, basically, yeah, your phone's camera becomessort of an integrating film TLD.

That reading was on contact with a 1 uCi cesium source. Didn't have an exposure rate meter handy, but background readings seem to be about right as well.

I was really sceptical when I saw the app and read about it, but it actually doesn't seem like it's doing an awful job...
 
2012-09-19 02:20:53 PM
Infringement lawsuit in 5, 4, 3...
 
2012-09-19 02:33:45 PM
10 years ago, if not more, you could get "apps" for your PDA that would do just about anything, trouble was that you'd need the accessories (or make it yourself).

This includes auto Code Readers that would be as good as pro tools for a fraction of the price, and was easily upgradable.

I remember many medical use for them, same thing, proper software and the accessories and you could have had a single device that would have done just about anything.

Funny how time as passed and people are just learning that portable devices can do things that many believes that you need a dedicated ($$$$) machine to do.

Of course, it takes it being an Apple device to get noticed, but oh well.
 
2012-09-19 02:38:19 PM
But they are still working on an app to place telephone calls.
 
2012-09-19 02:55:32 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Great Porn Dragon: If this works, and a version isn't ported to Android...this may actually be the first legitimate reason I have to get an iDevice :D

/asthmatic, and frankly would like to head off trouble before getting to the "nebuliser at the urgent care clinic and/or weeklong prednisone course for REALLY bad flares" level

See Boobies.


And unfortunately SpiroSmart;

a) doesn't seem to be actually downloadable, and
b) at least per the actual ACM paper is presently VERY iPhone specific and not even really universal across iDevices (only thing it's been tested on is an iPhone 4S, and there are differences between audio libraries in different iDevices, much less between iPhone and different Android phones).

That said, though, the idea seems plausible enough :3

Now, once it's downloadable and ESPECIALLY if it can be ported to Android...yeah, definitely will be giving it a shot :D
 
2012-09-19 03:01:08 PM
We're working on some other stuff like this at Mizzou's lab with the Microsoft Kinect and measuring joint angles (flexion and valgus) in the legs during jumps to detect likelihood of ACL injury in female athletes.

Off-shelf consumer electronics are the future of medical diagnostics. Insanely cheaper.
 
2012-09-19 03:31:46 PM

Marine1: We're working on some other stuff like this at Mizzou's lab with the Microsoft Kinect and measuring joint angles (flexion and valgus) in the legs during jumps to detect likelihood of ACL injury in female athletes.


4.bp.blogspot.com

Brilliant!
 
2012-09-19 06:59:43 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Marine1: We're working on some other stuff like this at Mizzou's lab with the Microsoft Kinect and measuring joint angles (flexion and valgus) in the legs during jumps to detect likelihood of ACL injury in female athletes.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 280x390]

Brilliant!


I get to be a part of the testing crew. We're getting the intramural women's soccer team to be the subjects, apparently.

Not that I'm looking forward to it or anything...
 
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