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(Discover)   What an ash hole   (blogs.discovermagazine.com) divider line 17
    More: Cool, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, volcanoes, solar winds, fly ashes, meteor impacts  
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5271 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Sep 2012 at 1:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-18 02:01:58 PM
Always good to read a BA article where i agree with everything he says.

Oh, that Moon of ours. We've sent twelve humans there

Goddammit.
 
2012-09-18 02:15:12 PM
Related?

blogs.discovermagazine.com

img.gawkerassets.com
 
2012-09-18 02:22:45 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Related?

[blogs.discovermagazine.com image 610x548]

[img.gawkerassets.com image 200x200]


One's a crater, the other is 'meth: Stage One'
 
2012-09-18 03:29:05 PM
http://pumpkinswirl08.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/ash-williams-evil-de ad-74400.jpg
 
2012-09-18 03:30:02 PM
pumpkinswirl08.files.wordpress.com 

The only ash that can be an ash hole.
 
2012-09-18 03:48:28 PM
dilbert.com
 
2012-09-18 03:57:46 PM
So, do we know if the Moon is still warm inside, or is it cold to the core?
 
2012-09-18 05:43:46 PM

RedVentrue: So, do we know if the Moon is still warm inside, or is it cold to the core?


According to WP, "Analyses of the Moon's time-variable rotation indicate that the core is at least partly molten. ... The core is surrounded by the partially (10 to 30%) melted layer of the lower mantle.... ... The temperature in the core is probably about 1600-1700 K."
 
2012-09-18 06:29:56 PM

RedVentrue: So, do we know if the Moon is still warm inside, or is it cold to the core?


i.imgur.com
 
2012-09-18 06:41:08 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: RedVentrue: So, do we know if the Moon is still warm inside, or is it cold to the core?

According to WP, "Analyses of the Moon's time-variable rotation indicate that the core is at least partly molten. ... The core is surrounded by the partially (10 to 30%) melted layer of the lower mantle.... ... The temperature in the core is probably about 1600-1700 K."


I'm thinking that it wouldn't be possible for the center to "cool down." The rest of the mass of the moon squeezes it. Applying pressure heats it up. At the same time, it raises the melting point, so that the inner core is solid like the earth's even though the outer core is not solid.

No matter how much heat radiates away from the surface over time, it isn't going to eliminate the pressure that causes the heat at the core and eventually it should reach a point of equilibrium.

What the earth has that the moon does not is convection of the mantle to promote a rock cycle and plate tectonics.

That's my understanding of it, at least. IANAG.
 
2012-09-18 06:50:52 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: RedVentrue: So, do we know if the Moon is still warm inside, or is it cold to the core?

According to WP, "Analyses of the Moon's time-variable rotation indicate that the core is at least partly molten. ... The core is surrounded by the partially (10 to 30%) melted layer of the lower mantle.... ... The temperature in the core is probably about 1600-1700 K."


Radioactivity? Heavy metals? Imagine mining there in 1/6 g.
 
2012-09-18 06:52:49 PM

BolloxReader: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: RedVentrue: So, do we know if the Moon is still warm inside, or is it cold to the core?

According to WP, "Analyses of the Moon's time-variable rotation indicate that the core is at least partly molten. ... The core is surrounded by the partially (10 to 30%) melted layer of the lower mantle.... ... The temperature in the core is probably about 1600-1700 K."

I'm thinking that it wouldn't be possible for the center to "cool down." The rest of the mass of the moon squeezes it. Applying pressure heats it up. At the same time, it raises the melting point, so that the inner core is solid like the earth's even though the outer core is not solid.

No matter how much heat radiates away from the surface over time, it isn't going to eliminate the pressure that causes the heat at the core and eventually it should reach a point of equilibrium.

What the earth has that the moon does not is convection of the mantle to promote a rock cycle and plate tectonics.

That's my understanding of it, at least. IANAG.


It wouldn't be tidal forces because the Moon is tidally locked.
 
2012-09-18 06:53:46 PM

SVenus: RedVentrue: So, do we know if the Moon is still warm inside, or is it cold to the core?

[i.imgur.com image 400x675]


But if I had a space suit, I would travel.
 
2012-09-18 07:41:36 PM
What is Sean Connery's response to being nearly sideswiped in traffic,Alex?

/*Flees thread*

 
2012-09-18 08:32:57 PM

Apos: What is Sean Connery's response to being nearly sideswiped in traffic,Alex?

/*Flees thread*


!!!!AND DON'T COME BACK!!!!
 
2012-09-18 10:37:22 PM

RedVentrue: BolloxReader: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: RedVentrue: So, do we know if the Moon is still warm inside, or is it cold to the core?

According to WP, "Analyses of the Moon's time-variable rotation indicate that the core is at least partly molten. ... The core is surrounded by the partially (10 to 30%) melted layer of the lower mantle.... ... The temperature in the core is probably about 1600-1700 K."

I'm thinking that it wouldn't be possible for the center to "cool down." The rest of the mass of the moon squeezes it. Applying pressure heats it up. At the same time, it raises the melting point, so that the inner core is solid like the earth's even though the outer core is not solid.

No matter how much heat radiates away from the surface over time, it isn't going to eliminate the pressure that causes the heat at the core and eventually it should reach a point of equilibrium.

What the earth has that the moon does not is convection of the mantle to promote a rock cycle and plate tectonics.

That's my understanding of it, at least. IANAG.

It wouldn't be tidal forces because the Moon is tidally locked.


Well yeah but I wasn't talking anything about tidal forces. I mean, they've talked about possibly small earthquake swarms being somewhat correlated to tides but that was more due to the ocean tides shifting pressure on the continental plates or something like that. They were really downplaying the significance because it was a really weak correlation and not related to anything potentially damaging. I've never heard of tidal forces linked to heat generation in a planetary core. Have you?
 
2012-09-19 07:24:46 AM

BolloxReader: RedVentrue: BolloxReader: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: RedVentrue: So, do we know if the Moon is still warm inside, or is it cold to the core?

According to WP, "Analyses of the Moon's time-variable rotation indicate that the core is at least partly molten. ... The core is surrounded by the partially (10 to 30%) melted layer of the lower mantle.... ... The temperature in the core is probably about 1600-1700 K."

I'm thinking that it wouldn't be possible for the center to "cool down." The rest of the mass of the moon squeezes it. Applying pressure heats it up. At the same time, it raises the melting point, so that the inner core is solid like the earth's even though the outer core is not solid.

No matter how much heat radiates away from the surface over time, it isn't going to eliminate the pressure that causes the heat at the core and eventually it should reach a point of equilibrium.

What the earth has that the moon does not is convection of the mantle to promote a rock cycle and plate tectonics.

That's my understanding of it, at least. IANAG.

It wouldn't be tidal forces because the Moon is tidally locked.

Well yeah but I wasn't talking anything about tidal forces. I mean, they've talked about possibly small earthquake swarms being somewhat correlated to tides but that was more due to the ocean tides shifting pressure on the continental plates or something like that. They were really downplaying the significance because it was a really weak correlation and not related to anything potentially damaging. I've never heard of tidal forces linked to heat generation in a planetary core. Have you?


Europa, Io.
 
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