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(Daily Bhaskar)   Alien life to be found within 40 years. "Prepare for face off"   (daily.bhaskar.com) divider line 75
    More: Amusing, Professor Stephen Hawking  
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7328 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Sep 2012 at 2:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-09-18 12:36:39 PM
I'd actually prefer for it to be a "pants-off dance-off." I feel I'm more prepared for that.
 
2012-09-18 01:07:21 PM
upload.wikimedia.org

Does NOT Approve
 
2012-09-18 01:27:23 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-09-18 01:30:57 PM
I saw some ted talk with some astronomer guy or whatever he was talking about how they could get a spectrometer(not sure if that is correct term) reading on light passing through a planets atmosphere and tell what gasses make it up, they could also tell if there was man made stuff in the atmosphere, pretty neat...
 
2012-09-18 01:31:53 PM
Prepared:

www.blogcdn.com
 
2012-09-18 01:42:51 PM

Headso: I saw some ted talk with some astronomer guy or whatever he was talking about how they could get a spectrometer(not sure if that is correct term) reading on light passing through a planets atmosphere and tell what gasses make it up, they could also tell if there was man made stuff in the atmosphere, pretty neat...


If it's on an alien planet, I'm going to go out on a limb and guess it's not "man" made.
 
2012-09-18 02:49:10 PM
www.alicia-logic.com
 
2012-09-18 02:53:15 PM
"London: Alien life beyond our solar system could be discovered within the next 40 years, a top astronomer from the United Kingdom has said."

"Also from London: Alien life beyond our solar system probably won't be discovered within the next 40 years, another top astronomer from the United Kingdom has giggled."
 
2012-09-18 02:54:45 PM
photo.goodreads.com

My prolepsis indicates that the Great Intervention will occur in a little over a year.
 
2012-09-18 02:55:18 PM

Fark Rye For Many Whores: [www.alicia-logic.com image 300x345]


Have you ever been mistaken by a man?.
 
2012-09-18 02:57:02 PM
I ain't no alien, man! I was born in East L.A.
 
2012-09-18 02:57:40 PM
So, if evidence of life is found on Mars by the Curiosity rover in the next few months, would that count?
 
2012-09-18 02:57:49 PM
Cool, so we can visit the Ringworld with our Alcubierre ships?
 
2012-09-18 02:58:07 PM
"Alien life beyond our solar system could be discovered within the next 40 years"

Also, this just in from the Douchebag Insurance Holding Co. : "You could save up to 15% or more on car insurance."

These two statements are essentially identical. They both postulate the possibility of a thing, then instantly back off to such vague generalities that you couldn't even use it as a map that leads to this universe.

But at least the second source has funny commercials.
 
2012-09-18 02:58:08 PM
I will my firearm hidden in my rectum for safe keeping
 
2012-09-18 02:59:09 PM
Is that where the aliens land and rip our faces off?
 
2012-09-18 03:00:01 PM
Impossible. The Bible would have mentioned if God created other planets and populated them with other dirt-men and rib-women.
 
2012-09-18 03:01:26 PM
Could be a lot less than 40 years if the stars are right!
/ Ia Dagon! Ia Cthulhu!
 
2012-09-18 03:02:36 PM

Somacandra: [upload.wikimedia.org image 216x264]

Does NOT Approve


Came for this, leaving VERY happy
 
2012-09-18 03:04:10 PM

dready zim: Is that where the aliens land and rip our faces off?




moviemusereviews.com

What a 'face-eating alien' may look like. 

or not

"Face-eating, Jack? Is that a delicacy"?
 
2012-09-18 03:07:38 PM

ZMugg: dready zim: Is that where the aliens land and rip our faces off?



[moviemusereviews.com image 450x338]

What a 'face-eating alien' may look like. 

or not

"Face-eating, Jack? Is that a delicacy"?


They won't have baseball there, either.
 
2012-09-18 03:07:49 PM
Something I was thinking about the other day: The discovery of alien life is going to be the greatest discovery the world has ever witnessed...followed by a whole lot of nothing.

Assuming we find intelligent life not of this solar system (i.e. microbes on Mars or under the Europan ice), it's probably going to be from radio waves. Those radio waves will probably originate from at least 10-20 light years from Earth, possibly a lot, lot further. We could not have another civilization within 100 light years of us and still have the best parts of the Drake Equation hold up for our galaxy.

So any signal we get will be years old, and we'll have to wait an equal number of years x 2 to send and receive a message. Functionally, how is this going to work? You have to figure out how to communicate first, we'll be sending a lot of math and information about elements to gain a common language of some kind. But while each side is sending all this info the other side isn't getting it for 100 years, then they have to evaluate the info they received and send back acknowledgements...but then they're also getting all this other info the other side has been sending for the past 100 years. It might take two or three send/receives to get to the point where we can say even the most basic of messages to each other, and by that point you're talking like half a millennium of time. Is the other side even still alive? Have we reached a point where space travel has rendered our initial messages meaningless? Is each planet "breathlessly" awaiting the next response from the other planet in 100 year intervals? 

Or say we get a signal from even further away: 1000, or even 10,000 light years? Do we even bother to respond to such a signal?
 
2012-09-18 03:08:18 PM
Oh jeez. I had to slam my laptop shut. My chimpanzee was reading over my shoulder. If he'd seen that crack about how he can't understand quantum physics, that's all I would have heard for the next six months.

Just now getting past the whole "can't grasp the nature of an ethereal soul" thing.

*shudder*
 
2012-09-18 03:08:30 PM

Well I use Mac/Linux...: Impossible. The Bible would have mentioned if God created other planets and populated them with other dirt-men and rib-women.


There always has to be one in every thread.
 
2012-09-18 03:09:41 PM

KangTheMad: Cool, so we can visit the Ringworld with our Alcubierre ships?


And dine on 3D printed snacks on the way! We should also stop off at Elon Musk's Mars condo.
 
2012-09-18 03:14:00 PM
Hope it's sooner. I'd like to be around for that.
 
2012-09-18 03:18:21 PM

Kibbler: Oh jeez. I had to slam my laptop shut. My chimpanzee was reading over my shoulder. If he'd seen that crack about how he can't understand quantum physics, that's all I would have heard for the next six months.

Just now getting past the whole "can't grasp the nature of an ethereal soul" thing.

*shudder*


Dude ... how did you just type that with your laptop shut?
 
2012-09-18 03:18:52 PM

jayhawk88: Something I was thinking about the other day: The discovery of alien life is going to be the greatest discovery the world has ever witnessed...followed by a whole lot of nothing.

Assuming we find intelligent life not of this solar system (i.e. microbes on Mars or under the Europan ice), it's probably going to be from radio waves. Those radio waves will probably originate from at least 10-20 light years from Earth, possibly a lot, lot further. We could not have another civilization within 100 light years of us and still have the best parts of the Drake Equation hold up for our galaxy.

So any signal we get will be years old, and we'll have to wait an equal number of years x 2 to send and receive a message. Functionally, how is this going to work? You have to figure out how to communicate first, we'll be sending a lot of math and information about elements to gain a common language of some kind. But while each side is sending all this info the other side isn't getting it for 100 years, then they have to evaluate the info they received and send back acknowledgements...but then they're also getting all this other info the other side has been sending for the past 100 years. It might take two or three send/receives to get to the point where we can say even the most basic of messages to each other, and by that point you're talking like half a millennium of time. Is the other side even still alive? Have we reached a point where space travel has rendered our initial messages meaningless? Is each planet "breathlessly" awaiting the next response from the other planet in 100 year intervals? 

Or say we get a signal from even further away: 1000, or even 10,000 light years? Do we even bother to respond to such a signal?


I guess one thing that would happen would be that we'd start paying a lot more attention to everything within 25 light years or so. Might be a bit meh if we observe those in detail for a few years and don't find anything though.
 
2012-09-18 03:19:24 PM
What if they have an evangelical religion of their own?

www.globalspeculations.com
 
2012-09-18 03:21:44 PM

eraser8: Headso: I saw some ted talk with some astronomer guy or whatever he was talking about how they could get a spectrometer(not sure if that is correct term) reading on light passing through a planets atmosphere and tell what gasses make it up, they could also tell if there was man made stuff in the atmosphere, pretty neat...

If it's on an alien planet, I'm going to go out on a limb and guess it's not "man" made.


I think he was saying you can tell if the gas came out of an alien's butt, if I understood him correctly.
 
2012-09-18 03:22:04 PM

CygnusDarius: Fark Rye For Many Whores: [www.alicia-logic.com image 300x345]

Have you ever been mistaken by a man?.


No, have you?
 
2012-09-18 03:23:28 PM

Well I use Mac/Linux...: Impossible. The Bible would have mentioned if God created other planets and populated them with other dirt-men and rib-women.


"If God wanted to, then he could." See? Christian philosophy is very malleable.
 
2012-09-18 03:26:27 PM

jayhawk88: Something I was thinking about the other day: The discovery of alien life is going to be the greatest discovery the world has ever witnessed...followed by a whole lot of nothing.

Assuming we find intelligent life not of this solar system (i.e. microbes on Mars or under the Europan ice), it's probably going to be from radio waves. Those radio waves will probably originate from at least 10-20 light years from Earth, possibly a lot, lot further. We could not have another civilization within 100 light years of us and still have the best parts of the Drake Equation hold up for our galaxy.

So any signal we get will be years old, and we'll have to wait an equal number of years x 2 to send and receive a message. Functionally, how is this going to work? You have to figure out how to communicate first, we'll be sending a lot of math and information about elements to gain a common language of some kind. But while each side is sending all this info the other side isn't getting it for 100 years, then they have to evaluate the info they received and send back acknowledgements...but then they're also getting all this other info the other side has been sending for the past 100 years. It might take two or three send/receives to get to the point where we can say even the most basic of messages to each other, and by that point you're talking like half a millennium of time. Is the other side even still alive? Have we reached a point where space travel has rendered our initial messages meaningless? Is each planet "breathlessly" awaiting the next response from the other planet in 100 year intervals? 

Or say we get a signal from even further away: 1000, or even 10,000 light years? Do we even bother to respond to such a signal?


This has what always depressed me about SETI. It would be a wonderful discovery. But does it really change anything? Not at all. You still have the vastness of space that makes it nearly impossible in many lifetimes to bridge the gap. And even if you did, it's entirely possible that the life we discover, no longer exists. Lots can happen in hundreds of years.

IN the end, even if we aren't alone, we really still are.
 
2012-09-18 03:30:57 PM
Headso

I saw some ted talk with some astronomer guy or whatever he was talking about how they could get a spectrometer(not sure if that is correct term) reading on light passing through a planets atmosphere and tell what gasses make it up, they could also tell if there was man made stuff in the atmosphere, pretty neat...

Maybe you meant "artificial stuff in the atmosphere."

Yes, spectrometer is the correct word, and if you know what the light source (the parent star) looks like before it passes through the atmosphere, then you could compare it to what it looks like after it passes through the atmosphere, and determine what wavelengths were missing (i.e., absorbed by the atmosphere). Then, if you already know what gasses absorb those particular wavelengths, you have a pretty good idea what's in the atmosphere. I don't know how hard that is for an extrasolar planet, since it seems like the planet's absorption is going to be wiped out by the parent star's emissions.

I'm not a chemist, so give me a little room here for speculation. I would imagine that knowing something about geology on Earth and the planets in our solar system, we could formulate a rough idea of what should be present in an atmosphere with life (our kind of life anyway), vs. no life. For instance, free oxygen is fairly reactive, and would combine with most elements in rocks and soil, so wouldn't be expected to be running around loose in large quantities in an atmosphere (on Mars, it's mostly combined with the iron in the soil). The fact that Earth has so much is an oddity. But since we know about photosynthesis and its O2 producing capability, we can explain the large presence on Earth by plant life. Then, if we find a lot of it in some planet's atmosphere, it could indicate the presence of photosynthetic activity. Or it could indicate that there's some other non-organic process that we just haven't discovered or thought of. By the same token, if you found compounds in that atmosphere that we think only come from industrial activity, then we might infer intelligent activity (or that there's some chemical process going on that we just haven't discovered or thought of yet).

Fun stuff. I'm not sure about the 40-years business, but if it's out there, we'll find it eventually. If we live long enough.
 
2012-09-18 03:32:27 PM
Jayhawk, consider quantum teleportation and communication becomes a bit more feasible.
 
2012-09-18 03:36:37 PM

Close2TheEdge: jayhawk88: Something I was thinking about the other day: The discovery of alien life is going to be the greatest discovery the world has ever witnessed...followed by a whole lot of nothing.

Assuming we find intelligent life not of this solar system (i.e. microbes on Mars or under the Europan ice), it's probably going to be from radio waves. Those radio waves will probably originate from at least 10-20 light years from Earth, possibly a lot, lot further. We could not have another civilization within 100 light years of us and still have the best parts of the Drake Equation hold up for our galaxy.

So any signal we get will be years old, and we'll have to wait an equal number of years x 2 to send and receive a message. Functionally, how is this going to work? You have to figure out how to communicate first, we'll be sending a lot of math and information about elements to gain a common language of some kind. But while each side is sending all this info the other side isn't getting it for 100 years, then they have to evaluate the info they received and send back acknowledgements...but then they're also getting all this other info the other side has been sending for the past 100 years. It might take two or three send/receives to get to the point where we can say even the most basic of messages to each other, and by that point you're talking like half a millennium of time. Is the other side even still alive? Have we reached a point where space travel has rendered our initial messages meaningless? Is each planet "breathlessly" awaiting the next response from the other planet in 100 year intervals? 

Or say we get a signal from even further away: 1000, or even 10,000 light years? Do we even bother to respond to such a signal?

This has what always depressed me about SETI. It would be a wonderful discovery. But does it really change anything? Not at all. You still have the vastness of space that makes it nearly impossible in many lifetimes to bridge the gap. And even if ...


Yes and no. It would be profound from a philosophical perspective, at the very least - and if we were able to communicate with a round-trip time of less than a human lifetime, we might be able to hold some semblance of a conversation and learn about our friends.

So yeah, we'll never meet a biological alien species in the flesh - but even knowing that they're out there would at least let us know that we aren't alone. It would alter philosophy, religion, biology, linguistics. It would be amazing.
 
2012-09-18 03:38:21 PM
They're watching our TV signals, seeing "Here Comes Honey Boo Boo" and preparing their preemptive assault fleets accordingly.
 
2012-09-18 03:46:46 PM

Close2TheEdge: This has what always depressed me about SETI. It would be a wonderful discovery. But does it really change anything? Not at all. You still have the vastness of space that makes it nearly impossible in many lifetimes to bridge the gap. And even if you did, it's entirely possible that the life we discover, no longer exists. Lots can happen in hundreds of years.

IN the end, even if we aren't alone, we really still are.


Good point... let's hope after the initial "hello" they tell us how to build one of these:

upload.wikimedia.org

But even if they don't, the discovery would give us a long-term goal of meeting them that may last centuries, a goal that will pull all of humanity together as one people to complete it. So I keep looking.
 
2012-09-18 03:51:01 PM

Pinner: Hope it's sooner. I'd like to be around for that.


The universe is huge. Like, enormous. Our lifespan is like a gnat's.
 
2012-09-18 03:51:58 PM

timujin: Prepared:

[www.blogcdn.com image 530x350]


Came here for this and leaving satisfied.
 
2012-09-18 03:53:14 PM

KangTheMad: Cool, so we can visit the Ringworld with our Alcubierre ships?


Can antimatter can disintegrate a Alcubierre ship hull entirely?

/It is not widely advertised
 
2012-09-18 03:55:58 PM
This series of books gives the perspective of "The Grays"
i1177.photobucket.com
 
2012-09-18 03:57:55 PM
If only someone would unlock the ninth chevron.
 
2012-09-18 03:58:37 PM

priapic_abandon: What if they have an evangelical religion of their own?

[www.globalspeculations.com image 303x400]

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-09-18 04:02:53 PM

ciberido: KangTheMad: Cool, so we can visit the Ringworld with our Alcubierre ships?

Can antimatter can disintegrate a Alcubierre ship hull entirely?

/It is not widely advertised


Does it void my warranty?
 
2012-09-18 04:06:57 PM

srhp29: I will my firearm hidden in my rectum for safe keeping


You'll do fine in Amsterdam.
 
2012-09-18 04:10:18 PM

basemetal: [4.bp.blogspot.com image 621x435]


What is with that guy's eyes? Am I the only one who thinks he looks stoned in every picture of him?

/or maybe a muppet
//or an alien
 
2012-09-18 04:17:04 PM

MrKevvy: Close2TheEdge: This has what always depressed me about SETI. It would be a wonderful discovery. But does it really change anything? Not at all. You still have the vastness of space that makes it nearly impossible in many lifetimes to bridge the gap. And even if you did, it's entirely possible that the life we discover, no longer exists. Lots can happen in hundreds of years.

IN the end, even if we aren't alone, we really still are.

Good point... let's hope after the initial "hello" they tell us how to build one of these:

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x164]

But even if they don't, the discovery would give us a long-term goal of meeting them that may last centuries, a goal that will pull all of humanity together as one people to complete it. So I keep looking.


You're quite the prophet- and a wonderful optimist. No one hopes more than I that you're correct. But, somewhat like our canine friends, the human beings have a tendency to immediately stick their noses up the butt of the Alpha Dog. Such a discovery may only mean the end of human history.
 
2012-09-18 04:23:51 PM

ZMugg: dready zim: Is that where the aliens land and rip our faces off?



[moviemusereviews.com image 450x338]

What a 'face-eating alien' may look like. 

or not

"Face-eating, Jack? Is that a delicacy"?


which movie was that?
 
2012-09-18 04:26:55 PM
"The Brookings Report," dealt with alien encounter. But it contained a stern warning. "Anthropological files contain many examples of societies, sure of their place in the universe, which have disintegrated when they had to associate with previously unfamiliar societies espousing different ideas and different life ways; others that survived such an experience usually did so by paying the price of changes in values and attitudes and behavior."

So we're screwed either way if we make contact.
 
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